Bolsonaro and Latin American Fascism

Bolsonaro and Latin American Fascism


Hello everyone! Today I’m going to talk about Jair Bolsonaro. The new president of Brazil as of the 1st
of January, 2019. I’m going to examine South American history
to explain the real roots of his ideology. And in doing so, I’ll introduce the concept
of Latin American Fascism. Here’s a very short summary, just in case
you happen to be unfamiliar with Bolsonaro. In the Seventies, when Brazil was ruled by
a right-wing military dictatorship, he voluntarily chose to join the army. After leaving, he became a far-right career
politician. Before winning the election last year, he
had spent almost three decades as a congressman, only having two pieces of his legislation
passed in 27 years. Some of his finest moments include:
Telling a fellow member of congress that he wouldn’t rape her because she “doesn’t deserve
it”: I would never rape you, because you don’t
deserve it. And proudly explaining into about a dozen
press microphones that “no one likes gay people: No one likes homosexuals, OK? No one likes them, and the people support
this. So yeah, pretty self-explanatory there. So, how does the international media talk
about his politics? Well, let’s take a look. Bolsonaro has restyled himself “the Trump
of the Tropics”. It’s an election where the frontrunner’s been
compared to Donald Trump. The man who’s been dubbed “the Trump of the
Tropics”. Meet Jair Bolsonaro. Labelled “the Trump of the Tropics”. So, they pretty much just compare him to Donald
Trump. And sure, based solely off those two clips
that I just showed, for example, he does seem a lot like Trump, right? But there is actually a lot more to it, and
I’m gonna show you why. There is an innocent component to these simplistic
comparisons with Trump. Everyone knows who Trump is, so it’s a nice
easy way for the media to give the viewer, no matter who they might be, or where they
might be from, a familiar reference point. But the problem with this is… These simplistic takes on Bolsonaro’s politics
are making him sound a lot less bad than he actually is. And that’s saying a lot, because comparisons
to Trump aren’t exactly glowing endorsements. Bolsonaro actually takes his cues from an
ideology that’s distinctly Latin American, one that’s far more dangerous than any comparison
to Trump could aptly imply: Latin American Fascism. Now you’re probably wondering, “Latin American
Fascism, what’s that?” And that’s a very fair question, because it’s
not exactly a common term. Yet it still probably planted an image in
your head, right? The stereotypical Latin American military
dictator, who probably wears their uniform to bed, medals and all. And that image is somewhat accurate. There is, however, more to it. Federico Finchelstein, a renowned expert on
fascism in Latin America, states that the right-wing dictatorships of the seventies
and eighties in South America, especially those of Chile and Argentina, practiced a
distinct type of fascism, inspired by more traditional forms of fascism, but nonetheless
quite different from them. And Bolsonaro, despite being Brazilian, has
been very open in his ideation of the methods used by these two dictatorships in particular. For example, in 2006, he bizarrely asked the
Chilean embassy to relay a message from him to the grandson of Augusto Pinochet, the dictator
in Chile from 1973 to 1990, in which he lamented the supposed “leftist propaganda campaign”
against the memory of Pinochet, and praised him as a great leader. Then, later, he openly praised Pinochet on
TV. Chile, ’73. Pinochet did what he had to do, because in
Chile, there were more than 30,000 Cubans. So, what is it that characterises Latin American
fascism? Well, it’s much more religious than traditional
fascism, with the rallying cries being ‘Judeo Christian values’ and ‘Western values’. Our generation faces an identity crisis,
which manifests itself in the permanent questioning of the traditional values of our culture,
and this involves, in many cases, the nihilist ideas of treasonous subversion. An internal enemy is then constructed that
apparently wants to destroy these values. This internal enemy is associated with atheism,
subversion, Marxism, etc. Essentially meaning leftism in general. So basically, the evil leftist subversives
want to destroy your religion, your family, etc, etc, everything good in the world. This so-called enemy is dehumanised, and effectively
any kind of measure against anyone deemed to be said enemy is legitimised. The armed forces are thus turned against their
own people, and this one-sided state terrorism is framed by its leaders as an existential
war for the nation’s very survival. Human rights are reframed as something that
must be earned, rather than something that is a fundamental. And certain people are deemed unworthy of
their protections. And, of course, while all of this is going
on, the economy is liberalised and public services are decimated. The clearest examples of this, both of which
Bolsonaro is strongly influenced by, were Argentina and Chile. In Argentina, from 1976 to ’83, 30,000 people
were murdered and countless more kidnapped, imprisoned, and tortured. In Chile, 3,000 and 40,000 were imprisoned
or tortured from 1973 to 1990. So, what does this have to do with Bolsonaro? I’m gonna let him explain that in his own
words. I don’t trust democracy. Democracy here is a mess. Up until now, people have openly said they
lived very well during the military dictatorship. We have to fight against the ideological brainwashing
of our children, and the destruction of the family unit. These leftist outlaws will be banished from
our homeland. We’re going to unite the people,
value the family, respect religion and our Judeo-Christian tradition. We will fight gender ideology,
and conserve our values. As you can see, Bolsonaro’s discourse is essentially
exactly the same. He identifies Judeo-Christian values, the
family, etc, as things that are apparently under attack from an internal enemy – leftists,
as is tradition – and he believes that they must be removed from the country by whatever
means necessary. He’s also adapted this for modern times, incorporating
the dog whistle of so-called ‘gender ideology’. Which is apparently also a threat to these
traditional values. He’s also adapted it to Brazil’s specific
situation, using its high crime rate to further justify the internal security doctrine, and
the idea that human rights are a privilege that can be revoked. Bolsonaro stated that “The policy of human
rights has to change. For humans, rights, but not for vagabonds
and marginals who live at the cost of the government.” Now, Bolsonaro is of course Brazilian, and
Brazil, of course, had its own dictatorship. While he is a supporter of this dictatorship,
he’s nonetheless clearly expressed that he thinks it didn’t go far enough, as in Argentina
and Chile, and that doing so would be the only way forward for Brazil. Can I speak? Can I speak? The grand error was to torture and not to
kill. So the rhetoric of the Brazilian dictatorship
was very similar to the dictatorships from Argentina and Chile. For example, the coup that brought the Brazilian
dictatorship to power was actually enabled by agitation from the religious right. But, it was nonetheless different in its methods. It preferred repression, imprisonment, and
torture to the extermination tactics that were used in Chile and Argentina. So Bolsonaro has clearly expressed his preference
for the methods used in Chile and Argentina, by overtly praising those dictatorships, and
contrasting them with the Brazilian dictatorship. Other times, he’s actually made more subtle
references. Such as in this television interview from
1999. Sorry, but through voting, you won’t change
anything in this country. Nothing. Absolutely nothing! It will just change, unfortunately, if we
start a civil war. And doing the job the military forgot to do:
killing 30 thousand. Starting with Fernando Henrique Cardoso,
don’t let anyone escape. We have to kill. If some innocent people die, it’s OK. Pretty confronting, hey? So, the 30,000 figure that he threw out there
might seem arbitrary at first. But, 30,000 is the specific, rounded number
of people estimated killed by the dictatorship in Argentina. One that is very well known throughout the
continent. Given the clear ideological similarities,
and Bolsonaro’s demonstrated ideation of the dictatorships of this era in general, this
seems to have been a nod of approval towards their methods, which he hopes to bring to
Brazil. When I was living in Argentina, I had the
privilege of attending a talk given by a survivor of their dictatorship. In 1976, when she was a 22-year old university
student, she was kidnapped, detained, and tortured for 105 days in the Puente 12 concentration
camp in Buenos Aires. She was only released because the file they
had on her, by some stroke of luck, didn’t have anything in it about her membership in
leftist student groups. She said that, in those years, an entire generation
of potential future leftist politicians was targeted and systematically exterminated,
and that this left a massive wound on the political landscape, with tens of thousands
of potential future leftist politicians wiped out. And she’s entirely correct, because you can
clearly see the effect this had in Argentine politics today. There are very few politicians who were leftist
activists during the dictatorship. In the clip, that’s exactly the scenario that
Bolsonaro hopes for. Kill 30,000 leftists, as they did, for the
same ends as they did. For him, the elimination of this internal
enemy is the only way to ensure that Brazil’s Western, Judeo-Christian values will be upheld. And, of course, there’s the economic similarities,
too. The free market shock treatment imposed in
Chile and Argentina by their dictatorships is infamous. And Bolsonaro has expressed his clear intent
to do the same. He’s also appointed Paulo Guedes as his Minister
of Economy. Guedes studied at the University of Chicago
during the seventies. At that same time, his alumni, known as the
Chicago Boys, were collaborating with the dictatorships in Chile and Argentina to introduce
free-market reforms. Later in the same decade, he taught classes
in Chile, extolling the virtues of the same free-market economics that Pinochet was forcing
upon the country at the time. Bolsonaro has, somehow, found himself an authentic
Chicago boy 40 years later. That’s so ridiculously pertinent that it’s
almost impressive. So, all of this considered, Bolsonaro quite
clearly fits the mold of the Latin American fascist. And this is a whole lot worse than, well,
whatever Trump is. The big question is: what does this mean for
Brazil? Well, firstly, while it is definitely worrying
that so many people in Latin America’s biggest country would vote for a literal fascist,
nonetheless, Lula, who was president from 2003 to 2011, was by far the most popular
candidate in every opinion poll, until he was disqualified from being able to run by
very questionable charges levied against him by Sergio Moro. Moro is the same judge who just months later,
coincidentally, became Bolsonaro’s Minister of Justice. This indicates that a substantial portion
of the votes for Bolsonaro came from people who would have otherwise voted for Lula. This seems like quite a conundrum, as they’re
obviously nothing alike. One is a leftist who is seriously concerned
with social and economic justice, and the other is a literal fascist. The precise reason for this is anyone’s guess,
but I would it has a lot to do with the media coverage. Bolsonaro was the face of the election circuit
in Brazil. Whether the coverage was favourable or not,
it nonetheless greatly increased his profile. So Bolsonaro would be the next choice for
a lot of people who were just kind of voting for the biggest personalities they see. This is exacerbated by the fact that Bolsonaro’s
campaign was heavily boosted by the dissemination of fake news on social media, such as WhatsApp. So, a lot of the votes for Bolsonaro were
probably less an endorsement of his methods, and more of his big, highly visible personality
that extolls plenty of nationalistic sentiment, combined with his dirty campaign tactics. It’s also important to remember that, while
he did win the election with 55% of the vote, only 38% of the voting population actually
voted for him. So that’s 62% who were either opposed to him,
or not inspired enough to bother to head down to a ballot box on election day. So, I wouldn’t say, at all, that the Brazilian
people have endorsed fascism here. It is, nonetheless, a significant portion
of the population. But it’s probably not enough to implement
his agenda without a fight. On that note, though, Brazil’s congress is
currently controlled by the right-wing. While few of them are quite as far to the
right as Bolsonaro is, this still indicates a scary possibility: Bolsonaro may not even
need a dictatorship. He may be able to simply get the legislative
votes that he needs to implement his criminal agenda ‘democratically.’ Nevertheless, analysts are saying that the
congress is divided between so many parties that such a mandate is very unlikely. So, what about the military? What do they think? That is the million dollar question here. Bolsonaro is clearly very pro-military. His cabinet is absolutely packed with ex-military
men. Eight of them, infact, with three being former
generals and one a former admiral. In an article for Foreign Policy Magazine,
Michael Albertus makes a convincing argument that the military is likely to cooperate with
Bolsonaro rather than seize power directly. This seems like exactly the kind of arrangement
that Bolsonaro seeks. And he’s constantly expressed his willingness
to effectively give the military a free pass to do whatever they might wish. The military were already deployed to Rio
in the same of “Internal Security” last year, under the previous president. They’ve been accused of a number of human
rights abuses there. Brazil also still has military police forces
that cover what are, in most other places, civilian policing duties. And its security forces in general are known
for levels of brutality and abuse that are almost unfathomable. So the precedent for military involvement
in civilian matters is already there, and it’s ripe to be expanded if both sides cooperate. Of course, though, international pressure
is a thing. The international community is very familiar
with the methods of Latin American fascists, and aside from, perhaps, the United States,
they’re unlikely to tolerate such a regime. Additionally, Bolsonaro has shown a clear
concern for his international prestige, recently appearing at the World Economic Forum summit
in Davos. So, such foreign pressure might stop Bolsonaro
from realising the full extent of his agenda. Regardless, history shows us that the South
American dictatorships of the second half of the 20th century were very good at concealing
and denying their crimes. This is especially relevant in Brazil, where
the military and the police force are already quite out of control, and barely ever held
accountable for their crimes. It would hardly be very difficult for them
to incorporate more humans rights abuses into their present operations while hiding it from
the outside world. All in all, I would say that it’s not looking
very good at all. Bolsonaro is an adherent of what is clearly
a very dangerous ideology that could easily get out of hand with support from the military. And that support seems likely, unfortunately. Giving even more power to the already out
of control military and police is a recipe for human rights disaster. Brazil looks set to undergo much hardship,
and, perhaps, even descend into chaos. But I still find it difficult to accept the
potential fall of the world’s fourth largest democracy. Even though everything I’m seeing just says
otherwise, I guess like many Chileans who watched the collapse of democracy back in
1973, I simply don’t want to believe that this is happening. Regardless, it is very important that we understand
Bolsonaro and Latin American Fascism. Brazilians need our solidarity right now,
more than ever. Being informed is an important prerequisite
if we’re to provide them with it, and contribute whatever little we can to make sure history
doesn’t repeat itself. Additionally, Bolsonaro’s success likely means
that similar ideologues will be inspired elsewhere. When they pop up, it’s imperative that they’re
called out for they really are, and that apt, historically informed comparisons are made,
rather than clickbait, like the [insert country name here] Trump. Nunca más y nunca mais. That brings me to the end of this video. Thank you guys so much for watching. I hope you’ve learned something, and as always,
all the sources cited can be found in the description. If you enjoyed this video, consider subscribing,
liking, following me on Twitter @BadEmpanada, commenting, etc. And if you’ve got any questions, feel free
to ask! I’ll be happy to answer.

100 Comments on "Bolsonaro and Latin American Fascism"


  1. We're fast approaching a point of no return. The neoliberal/fascist monopoly on power has to be shattered, and that isn't going to happen at a protest or in a voting booth. Platformism and espicifismo are the only viable ways forward if we want to avoid all-out insurrectionary violence. Organize or die, basically.

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  2. This video needs some perspective. It portrays the Left as a kind of pantomime boogeyman invented by these 'fascists' but can anyone point out where their characterisation is wrong? The Left IS against Christianity, traditional families and private property rights. The Left IS atheist (often violently anti-theist), feminist and Marxist broadly speaking. Furthermore leftist paramilitaries were active in Chile and Argentina at the times of the respective coups.

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  3. There's nothing wrong with Christian values. It's weird that people on the left like you promote Muslim, African & Asian culture why at the same time tell us to give up ours. If you want to stop a Bolsonaro type character from ever getting off the ground here in Oz then you need to stop with all this C.P. & SJW Rubbish 😉

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  4. Subscribed. More on this topic please. I believe theirs a connection between north america & the south that goes way back, even before the truman doctrine of american intervention in the south, when it was becoming the us, of wanting to establish dominance in the western hemisphere, where allot of that influence came from southern states towards implementation influence of their values.

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  5. I've got a patreon now: https://patreon.com/badempanada – if anyone would like to support my work, it'd be greatly appreciated! Each video takes a lot of work, upwards of 50-60 hours. I've been considering continuing on into academia for a while, but the fact that most academic work is inaccessible for the vast majority of people, due to paywalled journals, and the often ridiculous costs of academic books, really puts me off it – I don't want to make stuff just for a small bubble of academics. I'd much rather create content like this that everyone can watch for free. Anything you'd like to throw at me would really help in in that endeavour :). I'll re-invest it all into my videos in one way or another, and maybe one day I'd like to do this full-time, if that's even a remotely realistic goal. Thanks all!

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  6. Any analysis of latam fascism without a deep look into the US interventionism (from sponsorship to military support) that fuels it is empty.

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  7. Bolsonaro isn't even a Fascist buddy. He's threatening to destroy the jungles. Every Fascist group I've joined is against this.

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  8. State radio broadcasts in Rwanda were used to whip up the Hutu population into murdering a million Tutsis by hand with machetes. Propaganda works. There are clips of some of those broadcasts, with subtitles, available on Youtube. Search Rwandan Radio and you'll find them.

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  9. 6:55

    There's a mistranslation here. Bolsonaro is much more explicit in his rhetoric. He says that human rights have to be changes to only apply to the RIGHT HUMANS. Implying that only people who are in favor of capitalism and right-wing policies should have human right protections and that "vagabonds and marginals" (which are his dogwhisttle to the left) shouldnt be considered human at all.

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  10. I know it is too early for a follow up video, but recent developments might award it.

    An informant passed along telegram activity from Lula's prosecutors to journalist Glenn Greenwald that revealed that Sergio Moro actively collaborated with them to achieve the ruling including promises of conviction, as well that several times they collaborated with the explicit intention of harming the left during the election.

    Moro is defending himself in all contradictory manners, at first saying there was no wrongdoing in the conversations (the simple act of him actively communicating with the prosecution outside court would be anti-ethical anywhere in the world), to saying it was out of context, to saying he didnt remember the conversations, to then defending the informant was a hacker who edited the conversations (despite it being corroborated by Telegram themselves), to then, now, simply repeating over and over again that none of the conversations should have any weight since they have been acquired illegally and it is illegal for a journalist to expose them.

    This is further aggravated by the fact that Moro purposefully leaked several audios from bugs he ordered installed on Lula. Illegally. Some of them he leaked from conversations AFTER his permission was expired. And NONE of the private conversations had any confessions of crimes or the likes, but harmed Lula anyway because of comments he made frustrated with the supreme court, the failure of the left coalition to give his party support, and even misconstruing some comments as insults to people who are not familiar to northeastern dialects (many right wing blogs tried to agitate feminist movements over his bgged commentary that the feminist movements had "thick cunts", a northeastern idiom that specifically means "unwavering and indomitable", banking on the lack of familiarity to the term).

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  11. I still don't quite believe it happened… And besides his fascist tendencies, he's gonna sell out all our public goods… But this loathsome man showed the real face of many people around me, that now I want away!

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  12. just found your channel. finding a fellow aussie on youtube is a rarity, and youre a breadtuber to boot!! aww yeah man! keep it up. sub earned

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  13. I just wanna say that "Judeo-Christian Values" is such BS, no religion has done more to try to destroy Judaism then Christianity. It's fucking disgusting when my people are lumped in with that homophobic, conservative tradition

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  14. I mean, Trump is also a fascist, it’s just a different type of fascism.

    I really like Some More News for how they went through all of it in their Life in the Fash Lane playlist. They’re a comedy faux news show, but their research on this was excellent.

    So I wouldn’t say that Trump isn’t also extremely dangerous. He’s a buffoon to be sure, but a popular fascist buffoon.

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  15. Yeah the key dictatorship in Brazil was under Getúlio Vargas
    , though he was earlier in Brazil's history

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  16. Hi, Brazilian here. I really liked the video in general. it's good educationalk content, but i must say it did bring a tear to my eye to hear "nunca más e nunca mais." things do look bleak and hopeless here. Our president brandishes public universities as marxist propaganda centers and slowly but surely dismantles our social protection systems, and it's hard not to despair, but it does make me happy and brings a little bit of hope, to see that all around latin america, there's people who see what happens and are making pressure, educating others, and aiding however they can. Seriously, thank you.

    Marielle Presente.

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  17. This is really such a tiny thing in the whole video, and kind a longer discussion than makes sense to have in comments, and I probably shouldn't even mention it, but "Judeo-Christian" is not really a thing. It's a phrase Christians use to rope us into their bullshit and give themselves the legitimacy of a longer history and make them seem less anti-semitic than they really are.

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  18. The big difference between Latin American Fascism and other fascisms is that the "other" is extremely internal, and, unlike the Nazis with the Jews, for example, are very much part of society at large, and are based more on socioeconomic class, political affiliation, ideology and culture than on race and ethnicity (which are connected to these factors, but harder to distinguish neatly in Latin America), and the ultimate purpose ends up being very anti-patriotic, so to speak, because the oligarchic elites are very responsive to foreign interests that want to make sure that Latin America stays under informal control of other bigger economies. The "protectionist" policies Trump espouses, to "bring jobs back from China" or whatever, would never be proposed by a Latin American fascist. Being a Latin American is so depressing because even our fascists have an inferiority complex.

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  19. Sorry to all the Portuguese, Brazilians cape Verdans, Angolans Mozambiqans and macauans, but the Portuguese is such a repulsive language🤢🤮 I'm so sorry you it's you're first language and you have to hear it being spoken daily. My condolences to all the lusophone nations.

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  20. Now here on Chilr we have a new wave of third way anti Marxist anti feminist fascism that is also populist in its ant bourgeoisie rhetoric but to replace the bourgeoisie. Now with the deslusionment of the left collaborating with neoliberalism and inability to reform imposed by the constitution redacted by Pinochet ‘s military dictatorship

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  21. Maybe do an essay next time , this video is wrong all around. It's like you read a news article and just rant about it, you dont define anything, you dont give context, you misread and straight up miss facts, very poor video

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  22. I didn't even think the assassinations and political purge of the left in Argentina impacted the political narrative presently. For some reason it never occurred to me. Thanks for the input.

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  23. great video highlighting the real context of the situation in brazil. i knew it was bad, but i never really realized how evil and stupid this ideology is.

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  24. YOU ARE A COMMIE MATE. SHUT THE FUCK UP.30 THOUSAND COMMIES KILLED IN ARGENTINA, CHILE…BIG DEAL.LOOK AT THE TOLL THE COMMIES LEFT.WHY NOT TALK ABOUT THAT?LOOK AT EVERY COUNTRY THAT EMBRACED COMMUNISM.IT ALL, INEVITABLY TURNS TO SHIT.MARXISM IS A FAILED, MURDEROUS IDEOLOGY, STOP DEFENDING IT YOU MORON.

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  25. really informative video. ty. even though i had the knowledge of the dictatorships mentioned and the horrors that happened under them, i didn't connect that with there being very different kind of fascisms in practice.

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  26. Hey there, Brazilian here! I'm catching up on your content and you make awesome and informative videos, great work!
    Minor correction tho, in 1:02 the verb suportar in this context means to endure or suffer through something, even if you detest it. A better translation would be "No one likes them, we put up with them." Charming.

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  27. There’s no chance to fascism to happen in Brazil as u said the majority of the population didn’t vote for him and even who did vote for him didn’t necessarily did it bc they liked his policies but bc there was at the time and still exists today a strong rejection to the workers party “anti-petismo”. Besides that the military doesn’t support his ditatorial ambitions and our institutions are strong enough to avoid any kind of coup d’etat, he also doesn’t have a majority in Congress even though that the right wing are a majority right now they all don’t make part of the same political party which makes a lot harder to pass any peace of legislation that it’s too extreme.

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  28. Right before you mentioned that people compared him to Trump, I was gonna say: “And people think Trump is bad!”

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  29. Hi! Brazilian comrade here. I think that it's also important to point out that Bolsonaro didn't just "leave" the military, he was dishonorably discharged after threatening to bomb his unit's headquarters. It really surprises me how this never comes up even though his whole campaign is based on "military discipline".

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  30. Brazillian here, calling him brazillian trump is kind of insulting to the POTUS even though hes not the bad. While he represents a break from the corrupt PT its one of the worst candidates that could have been chosen to go up agaisnt him and happily hes unlikely to be reelected

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  31. "I wouldn't rape you, because you don't deserve it…" Imagine thinking that saying this is controversial

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  32. hello! I'm a brazillian and it's been hard to know what's been going on here. rio de janeiro's governor, wilson witzel, for example, has ordered military action on the favelas to kill criminals. those actions have already murdered two little girls. helicopters fly over the favelas and shoot with rifles at schools.

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  33. you talked about judeo-christian values. this is a term defended by our government's "guru": olavo de carvalho. he currently lives in the USA, is an astrologist and only studied until the fourth grade, if I remember correctly. olavo and some youtubers have polarized brazil's population to the point that there are pretty much only two options to the major public: you're either a tankie that (thanks to copious amounts of fake news) eats babies and wants everyone to abort and become trans, or you're a "cidadão de bem" ("righteous citizen", a right wing person that doesn't aprove of any progressive actions). (this works both ways and I would be lying if I said that some leftwingers don't demonize moderate right-wing people, but it happens way less).
    because of this polarization, people have "packages of opinions". if someone says they're right-wing and hear something on the news, the first thing they do is think "agreeing with this makes me right or left-wing?" if it's the latter, they disagree.
    att.: a worried brazillian.

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  34. Why was the example of Colombia not used? Alvaro Uribe govt’s. extra judicial killings know as “false Positives,” (great example of what military support of a democratically elected fascist) the almost complete elimination of the opposition in the 80’s by the religious right and the continuation of Latin American fascism via Democratic means.

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  35. Bolsonaro is a Godless bastard who will burn in Hell. Many speak of God but do not know Him, just as the Pharisees acted pious but were rotten inside, except these fascists don't even hide the rotten within.

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  36. Who would have thought that Chile was the one that will started a "democratic" war against it's own people under Piñera, the symbol of the Chicago Boys.

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  37. Excellent video. By the time it was over, I felt like I had only listened to the intro and was ready for hours more to get even more specific details on present-day Brazil and Latin American fascism overall.

    While things have been looking grim, I can't help but hope the Lula's recent release from prison serves as a moment to rally the people and mount a serious counter-offensive against Bolsanaro and the criminals he is aligned with.

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  38. Thing is:
    Bolsonaro is as stupid as he is evil.
    He lacks leadership or real thought capacity. That's the real reason he fled from most debates in the campaing rally.
    Oh, and his sons are deeply involved with Rio de Janeiro mafia, the "milícias".

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  39. Yk what's crazy. Brazialian and Chilean Fascists weren't even that bad compared to Trujillo. That man was basically the Western Hemispheres Hitler. So imagine how bad he was if he made the other Fascist leaders "not as bad" and yk who put Trujillo in power? The United States.

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  40. From many angles Bolsonaro has a creepy resemblance to the late popular astrophysicist and pacifist Carl Sagan (the US TV series "Cosmos", many books) – he's kind of like Sagan's evil twin…

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  41. Every generation there's a far right political figure that emerges because of the same. Damn. Theme. Identity politics National identity, religious & family values, being subverted so they'll subvert Democracy. It never gets old to them.

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  42. Trump is literally a fascist, though. Or proto fascist, depending on how you define his success.
    Look for Some More News, with Cody Johnston right here in youtube:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fIN8oxnw__I
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GM1w8_dOcR8
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CcklYVR5I-I
    It's an excellent historical analysis of the parallels of Trump and other fascist movements, Nazis included (but not being the only ones).

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  43. Fascism is quick to hide itself from the public until they have power…we should stop fucking around with the nazis in our countries, before long they will find and fund each other to do horrible acts in the name of bigotry…they should be openly shamed and outed and exiled/rehabilitated/taken off their pulpits

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  44. How is this different from north American fascism. With exception of the military wild card, this sound just like trumps election.

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  45. I found your video very informative and insightful. I was brought to your channel because you commented on David Packman. I actually wrote an article on Latin America a while ago and I now wish I had seen your video on Latin American Fascism. I would like to know your opinion on my article at https://angiesdiary.com/economy/cryptocurrency-conspiracy-theory/ . Once again, great video and I now wished I had seen it before I had wrote the article. All the best!

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  46. You facking fascist liar, there was no 30.000 Cubans in Chile, another lie was spread before the militar putsch in Brazil,, besides the demonstration from far rights familia and tradicion, the media and conservative forces said that was an communist army trained in Cuba, it was a lie, because after the putsch, no army trained in Cuba started to fight against this U.S. coup dètat in Brazil, if there was a trained in Cuba people`s Brazilians army, they would fight against those fascists.

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  47. very interesting to hear about latin american politics, great to find an informative channel that gives historical context. subbed!

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  48. Bolsonaro isnt latin american fascism, if you want to look at real fascism in the south you should search for Peron…

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  49. It would be really interesting to watch a study around Chile’s actual social issue, and how president Piñera has been answering to the social demands with fascist techniques!
    Also how this is specially relevant in terms of the country’s history and the memory of 73’ dictatorship.

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  50. I can't believe the people defending Bolsonaro. He doesn't even try to hide his racist, homophobic and fascist opinions. How can anyone ignore that?

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  51. He's more comparable to Franco, who killed about a million between 1936 – mid 1970's in Spain, and said he was willing to kill half of the Spanish population to "save" it from Marxism.

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