Evo Morales and the threat to democracy in Latin America | IN 60 SECONDS

Evo Morales and the threat to democracy in Latin America | IN 60 SECONDS


Recently, leftists won landslide
elections in Argentina, and left-of-centre candidates won key mayoral
posts in Colombia. For all its faults, democracy works in Latin America. But
fair elections weren’t good enough for Bolivia’s leftist President Evo Morales,
who was caught trying to steal an illegal fourth term, and had to flee the
country when the army sided with pro-democracy protesters. In Ecuador and
Chile, leftists have tried to oust democratically-elected leaders using mob
violence. The rampage continues in Chile, despite the president’s decision to
reverse unpopular transit fare hikes and to increase social spending. It’s clear
that Latin America’s leftists want power by any means necessary. In Bolivia and
Ecuador, authorities suspect Cuban subversion. The
narco-regime in Venezuela and the narco-dictatorship in Cuba have the motive and
the means to attack the rule of law, democracy, and free market policies, and
that’s exactly what they’ll do as long as democratic governments let them act
with impunity. Will Latin American democracies confront mob violence? Let us know in our poll. And let us know what other topics you’d like our scholars to
cover in 60 seconds, and be sure to like and subscribe for more research and
videos from AEI.

8 Comments on "Evo Morales and the threat to democracy in Latin America | IN 60 SECONDS"


  1. Are we gonna ignore that Evo basically had the support of 70% of the public and has reduced the countries poverty by over half ? Yeah he broke the term limits rule, but thats because the supreme court, who is a democratic institution, said term limits were unconstitutional. Not to mention the referendum was basically tied 50/50 anyways. I can't say anything on Chile cause I dont know whats happening exactly there, but this is an extremely bias assessment of Morales. The interim president wasnt even the vice president, having jumped over him in favour of the leader of the senate who was the opposition. She is a Christian fundamentalist and considers the indigenous people of bolivia (60-70% of hte country) to be backwards heathens. Why are we considering this "coup" a good thing for Bolivia ?

    Im not even that left leaning, but like this is completely one-sided and a gross oversimplification of a very complicated issue.

    Reply

  2. It's long past time for the US to be actively re-engaged in the affairs of the Americas. Soft power tools can have a massive stabilizing effect in the region while also deterring the mass waves of illegal immigrants coming over the border. With Russia and China continuing their influence campaigns, the US needs be out there educating people on the historically failed leftist governments and their policies. The biggest challenge is the culture of corruption that has historically plagued the region though. Definitely not an issue that can be solved overnight..

    Reply

  3. Right, because democracy is good because reasons and US is a beacon of stability and freedom in the world. What a joke…

    Reply

  4. Wins an election and "had to flee the country when the army…" A coup. That's what the rest of the planet calls a coup you arrogant hack. Is "democratically elected leaders" your new term for fascists now? You just gonna gloss over the new fascist "president" of chile, who literally just decided she's the president and started torturing dissidents?

    Reply

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