Flying on Unbelievable Russian and Soviet Planes

Flying on Unbelievable Russian and Soviet Planes


(upbeat inspirational music) – Today’s video is all
about Soviet aviation. Many of you may be unfamiliar with this, but I want to show you what’s
flying on the Russian Plane, a Soviet airplane’s like,
and I also have the expert of Russian Soviet aviation,
Charles Kennedy with me. Antonov has the world’s
largest aeroplane ever. – [Charles] Yes, the
Mriya, the Antonov 225. – [Robert] Yup. – [Charles] And also the Antonov 124, the Ruslan transporter. (electronic beeping) (heavy beat music) – [Robert] Still, the size
just leave many people wonder, how does this thing get off in the air. (dramatic orchestral music) (singing in foreign language) – [Robert] The Tupolev 154 is
a three engine aeroplanes , one of the fastest flying
three engine aeroplane in the world.
– That’s true. (electronic beeping) (heavy beat music) It was, yeah. It was very, very fast. The sweep of the wings was very extreme. So it was, yeah, like an arrow. – [Robert] What’s the best
thing about Tupolev 154 to you? – [Charles] For me, well,
it was the workhorse of the Soviet Union. Even to this day, a third
of all air flight passengers ever in history flew in the 154. They built nearly a 1000 of them, so it was the backbone
of the Soviet Union. Which, by the way, is a country
that spanned 11 time zones. – I want to share with you,
my last Tupolev 154 flight. It was a flight from Moscow to a place called Polyarny Odace. Which the Tupolev 154 was used, because Boeing 737-800
couldn’t make the landing. The runway is extremely bumpy
and a lack of maintenance, so the only 154 can do
this kind of hard landings. (singing in foreign language) (landing gear squealing) – [Automated Control
Panel] 80, 60, 40, 20, 10. (rumbling) (upbeat music) – So the second plane
I want to show you guys is recently just retired. It’s also operated by
Alrosa Aviation from Russia. It is the Tupolev 134. (electronic beeping) (heavy beat music) This very trustworthy pocket rocket has done so many trips across Siberia. – [Charles] Yeah. – [Robert] My last flight
on them was in 2017, from a Mirny to Irkutsk. And I wanna show you guys how the men’s are flying
the Russian plane. What difference is the western pilots in compared to the Russian pilots? Why the Russian pilots seems
like pulling every muscles they have to operate the plane? – It’s a good question. I think the aeroplanes were very basic and not a lot of what you
would call power steering. These were– – [Robert] Made for real pilots to fly. – [Charles] Yeah, real pilots. The expression of like–
– No pushing a button. – [Charles] No, no, no. It’s man-draulic. – [Robert] Man-draulic.
– Yeah. Not hydraulic, man-draulic, yeah. But the 134, a real, like
you said, pocket rocket. Very high performance. In fact, it was even used
to train fighter pilots. Before military guys
went onto fighter jets, they’d have flights on
the 134 for training, ’cause it was such a rocket. (singing in foreign language) (speaking foreign language) (dramatic orchestral music) – The next aeroplane I want to show you is an Antonov 12, four engine turbo prop. (electronic beeping) (heavy beat music) Designed probably in the
late 50’s, early 60’s? – Yes, exactly. – It’s still operational
in a lot of countries like Belarus, and the flow
one, which channels together. – Yeah.
– And I remember, they opened the cargo ramp during– – That’s right.
– –in the air, just to show us the capability of it. – [Charles] Yeah. – [Robert] And then you see
all the smoke trail coming out from all the source in the engine. That was a great experience on An-12. – Yeah, really great, really great. Just the cargo net
between you and the sky. – Yeah, and what I admire, is this true airmenship of the pilots. They work synchronizerdly as a team– – Yeah.
– –to operate this An-12. We’ve got navigators sitting underneath, you’ve got engineer and you got two pilots sitting on the upper deck. – [Charles] Yes. (singing in foreign language) (singing in foreign language) (propellers humming) (electronic rattling) We’re gonna show us the Antonov 74. (electronic beeping) (heavy beat music) – Now this aeroplane has two jets engine, mounted high on it’s wing. I was very fortunate. I’ve flown it in Iran, and
they use aeroplanes converting from cargo to passenger. Very lucky, I had the
GoPro in the cockpits to land and you can see how the footage, from how the pilots fly them. (engine humming) (soft music) (electronic rattling) Now Charles, what’s
your favourite aeroplane in Soviet aviation? – I have to say, it’s the Ilyushin 62. – Ah. (electronic beeping) (heavy beat music) – [Robert] Four engines, Soviet premiere. – [Charles] Yes, yes. – [Robert] Intercontinental aeroplane. – [Charles] Yeah, Moscow to
Havanan, Moscow to Pyongyang, to Beijing, and yeah, all over Africa. A beautiful looking
aeroplane, like you said, four engines at the back. A real classic. – [Robert] I particularly
enjoy sitting towards the end, the rear of the plane,
to listen to the four solo FB30 engine. It is a symphony,
especially towards landing. You can hear different
pitch, while the pilot’s throttling the landing. It’s this amazing music to my ears. (engine roaring) (plane engine squealing) (singing in foreign language) The Soviet Union, they’re very creative. – They are creative.
– Their lack of materials, lack of technologies,
but they had to survive, they had to adapt, and came up with different ways on these aeroplanes . – So do you remember in North Korea, we flew on the Ilyushin 76. (electronic beeping) (heavy beat music) The big jet freighter. – [Robert] Of course. Four engine also, same engine as the 62. The solo one, I believe. – [Charles] Right, that’s exactly right, that’s exactly right.
– Solo xc30 engines. – [Charles] Yup, yup. – [Robert] You know, it’s
just, you were inside a shoebox, basically, at take
off, and then you can’t see. But it’s just, wow. Crazy noise, this aeroplane makes. – [Charles] Crazy noise, yeah. – [Robert] Crazy noise. And I’m gonna show you the footage. During one takeoff in North Korea, they have to put lots
of weight in the middle. Carry lots of stuff to
balance the weights, because it was not used
to have empty weight. Just a few passengers inside. I’m really glad that we’ve
flown a cargo plane together. – [Charles] I know. (engine roaring) (singing in foreign language) (plane engine roaring) (electronic rattling) So I’m sure you know this,
the thing to remember, but it’s actually the
fist super sonic airliner ever built was not concord. It was the Tuploev 144. This is a fantasy delivery air courier, never had the 144, but airfloat did. – So I hope you liked the video. I am Robert Glada. I was born at a time when there were still a lot and lots of Soviet
Russian aviation going on, but they were very fast
disappearing in the sky. I’m glad that I seized the opportunity to fly on this planes. Now sharing this video with you. (dramatic orchestral music) (slow dramatic music) (ding)

100 Comments on "Flying on Unbelievable Russian and Soviet Planes"


  1. I love to fly on rare aircraft types. Have you flown on any Russian/Soviet built planes? Love to hear your experience!

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  2. Russian/Soviet compared to Boeing and Airbus planes is like comparing a Bentley to a Land Cruiser. Russian planes can land anywhere (within reason) whereas Boeing and Airbus needs nice maintained runways.

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  3. Meanwhile, a faint voice can be heard echoing from the skies…

    "Welcome to my laboratory… where safety is number one priority…"

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  4. Hi Sam
    Regarding the magnificent Tu-134. I live in Eastern Australia and had the enormous privilidge of visiting Moscow and Leningrad/St Petersburg in the winter, in 1992 in the months after the fall of the Soviet Union. Temperatures were -35C and the airports I landed in were populated by large numbers of Aeroflot passenger aircraft in rows painted in white and blue and which I vieiwed contrasted against white winter snow. I had just flown from Singapore to Moscow via Dehli and the UAE in one wide bodied Aeroflot Il-86 when I first saw these sights.

    I boarded a very cool looking white and blue Aeroflot Tu-134 lfor a flight from Moscow to London late one morning on a tarmc contrasting with the surrounding snow and my seat window was the rearmost beside the right engine. The pilot kept the breaks on until the engine was running at full thrust before he releasted them for what was a very short run and really steep climb at high speed. This take-off is the most exciting I believe I will ever experience, and I take every effort I can to fly in anything big or small! When we reached England, we followed the River Thames to London at medium/low altitude and the view was as magnificent as that fighter like jet flight.

    From that experience I know the Tu-134 is a gun… really! I appreciate very much the way you presented the Tu-134 aircraft here in your excellent video and I also have warm and vibrant memories of some of the other aircraft.
    Cheers. David. Canberra.

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  5. Only on An-12 everyone has a air conditioner, and a big arse view. Only Soviet aviation planes don't lift into the air, they commands the air and lift them.

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  6. I never was a pilot but been in many aircraft and admire them. These Russian aircraft look like you have to have very good pilot skills rather than have the technology do certain things for you! Also, looks like its one hell of a work out on that throttle! Looks like wrestling an alligator! Great video and much respect to the pilots letting you film the inside of the cockpit!

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  7. I remember seeing Russian aircraft at the Farnborough Airshow tradedays many years ago. They were dirty, WELL used, dented, had bald tyres and glass noses so, apparently, they could be used as bombers in case of war !

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  8. Some of these planes hark back to the 1950's, but there is an interesting Russian plane of the 1930's the Tupolev ANT 30. This plane was a transport and it was huge. Paratroopers could hang on top of its wings and slide off. It was powered by 6 piston engines – I think most Soviet engines were spin offs of American Wright and Pratt Whitney engines but tailored for the tough Russian conditions. The Ilyushin il62 is a beautiful aircraft, long range and smooth with thrust from the tail and streamlined wings. But in all these aircraft the instrumentation is very out dated (analog inputs).
    Russia is a vast country, so their engineering focuses on simple, rugged easy to maintain/repair designs. I have never flown on a Russian aircraft but their aviation is interesting.

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  9. Nice video , but as in many videos , the supporting text is flashed by so quickly that it can not be read (especially this video) without constantly having to pause and reverse in order to read. It ruins the " flow " especially background music. I think the video producers already know what the text says , so it easy to forget that the audience does not know and needs adequate time to read. Other that that it is an excellent video but has room for improvement . I uderstand that some scenes are very brief , so maybe an introduction before the scene is viewed .Thank you.

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  10. I have not seen so many steam gauges for over 20 years, even light plane in the west have glass cockpits, but I like that green flexible instrument panel, really great to get the the back for maintenance. A Canadian kit maker Zenith have an option called unpanel, where the panel is on a swivel that can be placed where the pilot want.But the Russian ones cannot move like the Zenith can. Russian engineering are basically equal to the west, but they have less money and their design philosophies are different.Those giant cargo planes and helicopters are a sign of very advanced engineering, and they make their own engines. They do not value creature comfort as much as the west, so you still see ceiling fans in their planes instead of better air distribution by the AC system. They can add power boost for the controls when they feel like it, and I imagine the newer ones all have it.Their technology is not lacking, but money is. The airplanes itself are designed tougher and with larger tires to use unimproved landing strips all over Russia, in the west such as Canada, we have to retain old 737-200 for they are the only such planes that can be fitted with a gravel kit to use rough strips. To the Russian planes our rough strip is their normal good landing field.I know they are slow with safety improvements as well.

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  11. the 154 seems to land on the right side of the runway. BTW, i have flown on il62 from MOSCOW via DUBAI to KUL. It was just brilliant.

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  12. 4:00 "a third of all air flight passengers ever in history flew in the Tu-154"

    Yeah right. They made just over a thousand 154s and only 3 are left in civilian service. Over 10,000 737s have been made, starting several years earlier, and thousands are still in service. There's no way that quote is even close to accurate.

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  13. Antonov 225 Myra what an unbelievably awesome engineering feat and aircraft! 6 massive jet engines! I want one! ha ha

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  14. Damn… I remember flying from Yakutsk to Moscow in early 2000s by Tu-154. And I already forget that those planes was so noisy compare to Airbuses or Boeings. Thank you Sam Chui for the video

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  15. You are wasting your time with this garbage. Now, go to bed! On top of that.. your videos are good for rich..NOT for poor…! In future please carry some poor people with you…!

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  16. Great to see something totally different on an aviation channel. Thanks for your time and effort to educate us on these planes!

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  17. All these planes are made Soviet Russian TOUGH. The PILOT'S are always busy, like Formula 1 drivers changing gears in a turn. By the way, the Soviet pilots should have no dental fillings…. Or it'll all fall out from their teeth cavities, such is the cockpit vibrations.

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  18. Workhorse is probably the best way to describe these Soviet airplanes. Nothing fancy, nothing efficient (I mean ⛽️ fuel), they just work even under the extreme condition of the Mother Earth 🌍.

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  19. Really great video. On the beginning of 2020 Aeroflot – Russian airways will get their very first a350 in new livery. It will fly between Moscow and New-York. It will be great if you go there and make video about it.

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  20. Why the f*ck do you use the words “Russian” and “soviet” interchangeably? None of the planes you have shown are Russian! They are all developed and most likely built during the soviet times. The ANTONOV planes are not even from Russia. ANTONOV is from Ukraine. Please don’t mix up the names of the countries.

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  21. Excellent reportage. Impeccable graphics, too. Sbasiba Bolshoy. Johnnie de Bangkok CarSanook Media THailand https://youtu.be/VOggAvPuLmM

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  22. Does the lack of modern technology call for the 4 man cockpit crews in Soviet/Russian airplanes? Even the ancient Boeing 707 with 4 engines only required 3. The fan blowing on the pilot in the 134 was quaint. Typical Russian economics is to build 1000 planes capable of landing on a bumpy runway instead of just repaving it. Its simply amazing more people are not killed by Russian aviation flying Soviet era planes. If they are do they even report it?

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  23. the first plane shown here is MRIA it is a UKRAINIAN one that is not a Russian trash. dislike chanel for the unfair information.

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  24. Tupolev Design Bureau. Like Apple Design Bureau. But Tupolev has own factories. Apple has not even own factories. Fabless.

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  25. You had better to prepare information properly before making a video, because Antonov An 124 Ruslan and An-225 Mriya are Ukrainian planes. Not Russian.

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  26. Those cockpit instruments where shaking so much i wander if any of them were still working! 😀
    Goes to show how skilled those Russian pilots are and how strong those planes still are after +30-40 yrs of service.YET the west brainwashes us by saying Russian planes are shitty and dangerous, look at the 787 and 737 max, there´s some shitty planes for you!

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  27. I'm currently playing a game in Airline Empires where I gave myself a self-imposed restriction of playing without ever ordering planes from Airbus or Boeing. This video was very informative for getting some good alternatives.

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  28. Human control the airplane! And no software interrupts when flying an airplane. Honest manufacturing and awesome aircraft body strength

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  29. In the mid 80's I flew into the Soviet Russia. I can't recall the type of aircraft, but what I do remember is the long slit running almost the length of the cabin right down the middle. Bomb bay doors?

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  30. Great video! I flew on an Aeroflot IL-62 from New Delhi to Moscow in early 1993. Cool plane, but the interior was coming apart. However, I truly enjoyed the ride. Somehow, I got the impression that the pilots were actually flying. It moved through the air with a certain grace, something I had only experienced in DC9s and MD-80s before. Rear-mounted engines …!

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  31. Why do people glorify communism? Communism is worse than cancer. Its responsible for millions of deaths, even more deaths than fascism.

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  32. I love all the Russian aircraft for some reason. The 225 is bigger than the town I once lived in. That sucker is enormous. Wish the TU-114 was still flying – love to ride on that phenomenon.

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  33. 1:08 Атонов Ютуб коли буде офіс Ютуба в Україні в Укркаїни чи ми не …
    this is the plane of Ukraine! ATHENS
    this is the plane of Ukraine! ATONOV An 225 Dream

    Два дебіла

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  34. А too GiY рашен ?? два дебіла єто сіла це літак України ! АТОНОВ

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  35. Two Russian gay men Рашен бля літак длва підара https://uk.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%90%D0%BD-225_%C2%AB%D0%9C%D1%80%D1%96%D1%8F%C2%BB 1:08

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  36. "designed maybe the late fifties, early sixties" … "Yes. Exactly." (maybe, give or take… "exactly")

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  37. My first experience with Soviet/Russian planes was 1978 a cargo plane from Lumbago to Luanda Angola uh, I had very nerve experience but latter with Soviet passenger plane flying from Luanda to Cape Verde to the Caribbean Islands was marvelous and ever experienced memory.

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  38. like 5 minutes of your transitions and intros but inside cab shots are like 5 tenths of a second… god.

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  39. Wait, WHAT??? @12:23 he said those planes were converted from "CARGO to PASSENGER" planes! REALLY?, THAT is CRAZY and INSANE. ALL OVER the WORLD, it is the other way around. NEW, SAFE planes carry PASSENGERS, and after getting OLD and no longer structurally SAFE, only then they are turned into CARGO PLANES!

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  40. In Germany we don't say "this Russian aircraft is poorly maintained and thus probably hardly airworthy". We say: "Kackapparat" and I think it's beautiful

    Reply

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