From Centrist to Marxist revolutionary | My political journey

From Centrist to Marxist revolutionary | My political journey


My political journey
Hello everybody, This video was originally supposed to come
out after Philip De Franco linked my channel which gave me a bunch of new subs. I was gonna try to explain why someone would
be a socialist nowadays to people who may have never considered socialism a possibility,
probably because most people learn in school that the soviet union was bad and from this
they take that socialism must be bad. The script kinda ended up being a political
journey video though. I wanted to explain why I had these beliefs
and for that I’d have to explain many personal things. I decided that a political journey video was
too ego centrical and left the word file to rot on my hard drive along with some other
scrapped projects. When I posted an image of those doomed projects
someone suggested I hold a poll and let the viewers vote on which ones I should continue. I did so and a surprisingly high amount of
people wanted to see this. So here we go. This is my political journey:
I’ve always been interested in politics for as long as I can remember. I remember back in elementary school when
I learned about the political parties and what they stand for. Neatly every party in Austria has a color
associated with it which I promptly learned. At the time we had had 3 big parties. The left-wing workers party which was the
red one. The centrist Christian conservative party
which was black and the right-wing anti-immigrant party which was blue. I grew up going to school with some Muslims
and immigrants, so I am resistant the right -wing scaremongering about those groups and
never really liked the right-wing and their xenophobic views. To me those where the parties and I didn’t
have any preferences besides that. They seemed like equally good parties to me
and it stayed that way for some time. At 14 I went to business school in which I
learned the basics about the free market. Supply & demand and such. I also learned that the free market has upsides
and downsides like everything in life. On the one hand it gives us plenty of models
of cars to choose from while promoting inhumane working conditions on the other hand. Yikes
But that didn’t really matter to me at the time. I was in trouble because my grades where too
bad to stay in that school. I wasn’t that interested in learning about
accounting anyways, so I got a job in a factory. For this you have to know that in Austria
there is a system derived from medieval apprenticeship in which people as young as 15 can work in
the heavy industry. I quickly noticed that working sucks and that
having a money hungry boss who tries to illegally make you work overtime sucks as well. Of course at this time my politics changed
as well since I became close to being 16 which is the age at which you are allowed to vote
in Austria. I read all of the party manifestos and learned
what they where about. I didn’t have many issues that where important
to me at the time. I learned that the conservative party wanted
to legalize a 12 hour work day which was an immediate no-go for me. I don’t know if you’ve ever worked in
a loud, hot, uncomfortable factory before and honestly, I hope you don’t have to but
take my word, working 8 hours a day is long enough. For me this was enough of a reason not to
vote for them so I had to take the choice between the red and the blue party which are
both considered workers parties. The right wing party ran on a platform of
deregulating the free market and cutting things like unemployment benefits. From my time in business school I knew that
de-regulating the market can be very dangerous. For example rolling back food regulations
may allow for more and cheaper food but it might also lead to someone using unhealthy
methods of preserving or preparing the food. Of course I didn’t know why they wanted
this but that along with their xenophobic rhetoric was enough of a reason not to vote
for them. And that’s how I voted for the first time,
not based on what I believed was the best but based on avoiding what I believed was
the worst. I am sure many of you, especially in America,
can relate to that. And honestly I didn’t think that politics
was that important either. It never impacted my life in any way so it
wasn’t a big deal. In reality I didn’t feel like there was
much that could be done. Then over the internet I became more familiar
with critiquing capitalism. Contrapoints video series titled “What’s
wrong with capitalism” really helped me open my mind towards accepting that capitalism
may not be the perfect system I imagined it is. I’ve never been a great advocate of the
free market or something like that. But I assumed that it was the only system
around. People trade. People engage in wage-labor that’s just
how it is. And I still thought about it like that even
when the people on youtube pointed out the flaws. I was happy to critique capitalism but I didn’t
think we could replace it. Because at the time I couldn’t imagine a
practical way production could be organized differently. I knew what wage labor was like and yes I
did think that it was not fair that the boss get’s to make way more money for working
an easier job for less hours a day. But I didn’t have an understanding of how
we could do it better. My solution at the time was voting social
democrats. Advocate for a higher minimum wage. Increase unemployment benefits and even better. Give a universal basic income to everyone
to allow people to live a good life even if the automatization made half of the world
unemployed. This seemed like the solution to me. But then I learned more. I watched speeches by Dr Richard Wolf who
is the most prominent Marxist professor in the US right now. He explained many things I never thought about
like that. He explained how every employer-employee relationship
has to be exploitative to work. If you don’t know what I mean watch this
video I made on the topic some time ago. And then Dr wolf explained the most important
thing to me. He didn’t just continue to name the faults
of capitalism like Bread tube tends to do. He named an alternative way. He laid out how a seemingly small change in
the way businesses are run could have great impact on the ways we live and the future
of the economy. What was that change he proposed? Democracy. Democracy in the workplace and not just in
the state. What really has an impact on your life isn’t
what happens in the national parliament way over in the capital. What really makes a difference is what happens
at your workplace. Think about it, you spend 8 hours a day at
your workplace, wouldn’t it make sense for you to have some control over what happens
there? Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to vote on
who your boss is or on how the factory is going to be run? It doesn’t seem like a big deal I’ll admit. It sounds pretty easy to implement actually. But allowing people to vote on policies would
reduce the amount of money paid to investors and CEOs. If automatization would come along it wouldn’t
put half of the people out of the job anymore. If would just half the amount of time everyone
had to work. I liked this idea. The only problem I had with it was what it’s
called. Because by definition, if the ownership of
the workplace goes to the workers it’s called socialism. And that word really kept me away from it. Not because I was scared of socialism or because
I confused workplace democracy with Stalinism but because others would do it. Because if I explained that I liked socialism
I’d be expected to explain how I justify that Stalin killed 200 Trillion people. This kept me with the social democrats for
a while. A thought they where my best bet of politically
achieving something. The only party that demanded workplace democracy
at the time was the Communist party of Austria. The KPÖ which didn’t get seats in the parliament
since Austria’s independence from the occupying forces in 1955. I stuck with the social democrats for some
more time until one day I heard of something that happened. The Red-Black coalition that had ruled the
parliament until then was broken up by the Chancellor and leader of the black party. Yes it’s the guy who destroyed 2 governments
and caused snap elections both times. This was still his first time. When the coalition broke every party could
vote for what they wanted independently until the next election and all parties could bring
in suggestions for laws they wanted to adopt. The green party brought in a proposal that
would legalize gay marriage in Austria. The social democrats had legalization of gay
marriage as a major point in their manifesto, but they could never do it and stated that
the conservatives they work with didn’t allow it. However since the coalition just broke there
where enough seats in parliament supporting this proposal. The green party, the social democrats and
the neoliberals all theoretically supported the bill and they had enough votes to make
it law. But they didn’t. The social democratic party voted against
the thing they had promised they’d do. The green party and the neoliberals had nowhere
near enough seats to get it through and the bill died. At that point I realized how futile supporting
the moderates was. It was obvious to me that they hadn’t supported
it because they didn’t want to anger the conservative party with whom they hoped to
work after the next election. That was when I realized that the social democratic
party betrayed what they stood for in order to work with those who opposed their goals. At this point the Austrian social democrats
where dead to me. I also began to see how the conservatives
and the far-right party only made laws for the rich while getting voters with cheap scaremongering. I saw the depressing reality that the party
I hoped would do good didn’t do that. I had to look for a new party to vote for. I decided that the communist party, the one
that never get’s any votes because it’s name and history remind people of stalinism,
is the best one there is. At the same time I began to read more theory. I read Capitalist realism, Why Marx was right,
Das Kapital and I began to look at the history of socialist though. I learned about the Paris commune and the
Russian revolution. I noticed that I was getting more and more
radical. My demands for a Universal basic income where
replaced with a demand for workplace democracy and my demand for the rich to pay their taxes
was replaced with a demand that billionaires return the money they stole from their workers. I wasn’t sure if that was right. If being radical was good. After all I was told many times that radicalism
is dangerous. But looking at the world though the Marxist
lense made it obvious that many problems we have are due to capitalism. Child workers, unemployment, homelessness,
food waste, plastic waste, climate change, inequality, economic crisis and many more
are all results of the rules the free market places on individuals. I can’t go back to supporting a social democratic
party that ignores the root of those problems. Yes, increasing the minimum wage reduces inequality. But it only reduces the symptoms. If you want to root out inequality you have
to give the responsibility for produced value to the people who produced it. Yes banning that companies throw away edible
food helps with waste but as long as they support a system in which throwing away food
if financially rewarded the problem will never be eradicated. Carbon taxes are cute but they are no match
for the profit incentives of the fossil fuel industry. And now here I am. Cursed with the knowledge that every boss
I’ll ever have will do nothing but steal from me. I am damned towards knowing that most problems
that exist on this planet do so because of free market capitalism and even more damned
knowing that most people will never realize this enough to do something about it. Being a Marxist is hard because I know where
the problems come from, but I also know that most don’t know about them or don’t care
about them. So that’s it. This is where I am. I am a Marxist with the dreams of a socialist
utopia, or at least a world in which we don’t waste 1/3rd of the food that’s produced. You may have noticed that I didn’t mention
any anarchist influence in my ideology and I didn’t read anarchist theory yet either. I am not much of an anarchist but my opinions
on anarchism are worth a vide on it’s own. In short: I think we can learn many practical
things about questioning and resisting authority from anarchist philosophy but a true anarchist
society seems impossible to reach, at least for now. As I mentioned I haven’t read much theory
on it yet so don’t crucify me. Anyways thanks for watching. Be sure to tell me your political journey
in the comments. I’d love to read that. Also like share and subscribe and such. Until the next time. C ya

14 Comments on "From Centrist to Marxist revolutionary | My political journey"


  1. The Philip DeFranco video mentioned at the start of the video is:
    Katie Hill's MESSY Downfall Has People Shouting "Double Standard"
    [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6UdENV1GeB0]

    The link is in the description as:
    ✭ Secret Link: https://youtu.be/8mTWvFA9Qq4

    And it links to Viki's Bee Movie video.

    Congrats on getting the attention of a major youtuber, even if he's a radical centrist 😛

    ___________________________________
    First view & comment!
    (Algorithm booster comment btw)

    Reply

  2. Es wäre cool wenn du ein paar deiner Videos auch in Deutsch hochladen würdest(zumindest die wichtigsten und interessantesten, wie zum Beispiel: Fascism is Capitalim in Decay), so könnte ich die Videos auch Freunden oder Familienmitgliedern, die nicht so gut Englisch sprechen, zeigen.

    Reply

  3. My political journey is quite similar to yours: Since my family has always voted for the SPÖ or the Green Party I've always been against the FPÖ. However when I was about 12 years old Kurz had me convinced with his rhetoric but luckily my relatives pointed out his real intentions and I started to like the NEOS because I thought they have some cool points until I figured out, through documentaries, instagram(politigram) and my anti (US)imperialist dad, that capitalism might not be the best system to live in. But of course the prejudice of "the evil commies" in the Soviet Union and China was still stuck in my head so it took me until I was ~14 years old to realise how we have been manipulated by the bourgeiosie throughout history. I too told myself for a long time that "Capitalism isn't perfect but there is no better system".
    I'm already excited to vote for my first time and give my vote to the KPÖ.

    Reply

  4. My journey:
    2 years ago I had to move to Germany because my father was already there for 5 years because of economic reasons or simply capitalism. I didn't know that yet. I am quite shy so making friends has always been though for me. Here I met a guy that was willing to accept me and talk to me in school so I became friends with him. He was very alt right: white people superior, catholicism good, women bad, immigrants bad, free market good. He slowly started dragging me into those beliefs and I started watching Ben, Molenyeux, PragerU etc. But a few months later he had to leave back to his own country as he was an immigrant too (before this summer). That meant that I spent the summer alone and I spent a lot of time watching YT videos. Luckly I stumbled upon breadtube: Polidice, Shaun etc. and they deradicalized me. I turned into a socdem: Bernie good, Corbyn good, higher tax for the rich, green deal etc. I was starting to realize the problems of capitalism. I started watching more and more radical YTber like NonCompete and I became an anarchist. It was relatively easily for me to turn to socialism compared to other people I have spoken to because my country was once socialist and it was its peak time. Additionaly it isn't nearly as hit by cold war propaganda. But then I started watching more Marxist/Marxist-Leninist youtubers and accept the role of a state and democratic centralization.

    TL;DR apolitical -> ultra conservative -> socdem -> anarchist -> marxist-leninist

    Reply

  5. My political journey was a wild ride, you see, I am from the US, my first moment of becoming aware of political issues was when I was 13 and the war in Iraq was started, I was always a history buff and had a feeling that Iraq would be our Soviet Union in Afghanistan moment. I was staunchly against the war and seeing how the Republicans behaved in office assured that their party would never get my vote. Back in those days when I got to high school I was reading up on the history of Germany, as I kept hearing people say, wrongly, that the Nazis ruled Germany during both world wars. I kind of became enamoured with the German style of monarchy and started to advocate for it here in the US with the Theodore branch of the house of Roosevelt in charge. Fast forward to college and meeting a British person and being utterly trounced in debate over the idea of Monarchy, I felt there was no other options as Fascism was way too xenophobic and authoritarian, Stalinism was bad by sheer definition and I felt the Democrats, and their newly elected president Obama, were a bit two-faced, something that I would later have confirmed through their actions, so I went Socdem, as my main problem with the system was it being inefficient towards addressing the needs of the people, which is what I thought a monarchy would solve, I then spent a lot of time in my college's library and started reading political theory and history, for a short while I saw the advantages of Lenin and his talking points, but it wasn't until I started reading Emma Goldman and Peter Kropotkin that things started to click, been reading theory ever since and tend to describe myself as an anarchist.

    Reply

  6. Thank you for the video, I really enjoyed listening to it.
    My political journey was more a rapid warp. I grew up in the middle east so I was very apolitical since we're generally encouraged to have the state's worldview and it quickly became obvious to me that there wasn't any way to change the status quo (in my country) without some sort of a violent revolution;I was overly online, I played lots of video games to cover my disillusionment with real life and my country. I believe these were the reasons why the right's messaging (and their misrepresentation of the left) spoke to me.

    When I was 22 I started to feel frustrated both emotionally and sexually. I wasn't able to live up to the fantasy I had created in my head and that was when I found Jordan Peterson through H3H3 and he gave answers to my woes and discomforts. After practicing what he preached, I found that many of my initial problems were still there. Then the Christchurch shooting happened and I was snapped out of that whole worldview, started to hangout less with my Discord friends who as you can imagine had either similar or far more reactionary beliefs than me. By chance, I found Contrapoints, Dan Three Arrows, Peter Coffin and Renegade Cut whose videos helped me better understand why I was feeling so hopeless and what the root cause of them were. After the Zizek v Peterson debate I found Zero Books and I started reading their books and that's basically how I turned from your run of the mill gamer bro shitlord to someone who is looking less forward to the future but at least now I have an understanding of why things are the way they are and have the vocabulary to express my frustrations. I also regained some semblance of community which I had abandoned when I started my political journey. I'm now somewhere between a communist and a socialist but neither one is achievable in the middle east (due to the volatile nature of the region and the number of players involved) so I'm looking forward to leaving everything behind for the first country that starts to show promise in that regard.

    This turned out to be much longer than I thought, so thank you to anyone who read the whole thing.

    Reply

  7. I (m/18/German) went from a social Democrat to a Marxist over to a democratic socialist to a "Fuck idiologie I do what I think is best." point of view. I kinda started to really get into politics when I had to to a so-called "Praktikum". It's basically 3 weeks of looking into an job. I choose the local office of the "SPD", the social democratic party, but after some time I got more in utopian thoughts, which for me is a totally communist or even anarchist society. I wasn't really sure at that point of time. But with more time the reality of the stupidnes of some people puntched me in the face. I didn't understand why people were not accepting my arguments and liked it more to just say its the immigration that's causing all the problems and were ignoring the utopia that was so logical to me. That's why I started to get more into democratic socialism, a bit based on bernie sanders, but a bit different. While I always thought about who's the right party for me, in the same time I started playing in the theater in a small group of artists, and I started just thinking about the world. Still out of a left point of view, but different. Now it's more the single topics that are important to me and not really my own idiologie. My main points currently are :
    Total equallity
    Ending capitalism
    Stopping the mass murder of animals
    Get rid of laws that unnecessaryly take our freedom like making Marihuana illegal
    End rassism
    End sexsims, trans and homophobia
    And probably a lot of stuff I am forgetting right now…

    BTW, very interesting and inspiring video.

    Reply

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