How Tech Giants Feed Off Capitalism’s Failures

How Tech Giants Feed Off Capitalism’s Failures


“Disruption and disruptive innovation” “Disruptive technology” “Great disruptive thinkers” “Disruptions and disruptors” “Disrupting, disrupting, disrupting” “And we love the word disrupt, don’t we?” Disrupt! The word on your boss’s insufferable LinkedIn profile, next to the picture of him and his Tesla. Disrupt is a tech buzzword for “making things better.” And as tech companies undermine major industries and take over public services, we have to ask: Are they making things better? Are they saving us from an economy and a government that don’t work for most people, or is their success a sign that the worst is yet to come? It might be time to disrupt … the disrupting. Every year, tech becomes more and more part of our lives – from what we buy, to where we stay on vacation, to which stranger with too much cologne on we allow to drive us home at night. His name’s Chuck and I gave him 5 stars, ’cause he let me crack the window to fumigate. The steady encroachment of tech reminds me of what it must have been like when we first discovered fire. At first, it made life a lot easier: warming up your cave, cooking your food. But then one day you wake up and your whole family is covered in it and you’re like, “This is a little overwhelming.” But tech is cool! And that’s a plus when you want to distract news anchors from the potential downsides of, say, 7-11 delivering you food by drone. “The world’s largest convenience store chain revealed yesterday that is has delivered items to 77 customers in Reno, Nevada. You know what? I can order a Slurpee from the 7-11 near my parents’ house! From my parents’ house! – (MAN): Too much government regulation … – I used to walk to the 7-11! – (JOE): You don’t have to anymore. -(MIKA): Yeah! Wow. And that’s how you make the news all about yourself. Next up, we’ll mention California’s drought and Mika will tell a story about beating her brother in a squirt gun fight in 1974. And tech companies don’t just sell us on convenience and cool, but also the idea that there’s nothing wrong with disrupting the market. Because innovation is progress. Like Harmony, the talking sex robot. Progress. And innovation always leads to better results … right? “A new report out now says Airbnb is driving up rental prices and housing availability in New York City.” “Airbnb is playing a role in exacerbating the housing crisis that’s already going on here in Los Angeles.” “Nearly three-quarters of Airbnb’s listings between 2010 and 2014 were essentially illegal hotels.” “Ride-sharing vehicles averaging more than 170,000 trips in the city each weekday.” “Several drivers have banded together in a class action lawsuit against the company claiming Uber misclassified them as independent contractors and owes them money for expenses like gas and vehicle maintenance.” “Uber claimed their background checks were sufficient. But nearly 100 drivers were found to have failed the checks, with drivers who committed fraud, assault, DUIs and even possessed fake IDs.” OK, but what about the free gum. Huh? And the little waters? But the bigger impact of tech companies isn’t just that they’re disrupting retail, taxi and hotel industries, public transportation, labor rights or the housing market. It’s that they’re undermining them. Take New York City, the one place that arguably didn’t need ride-hailing apps with the amount of yellow cabs, car services and a subway system where you can watch men dislocate their shoulders for like a buck. In just the last four years, the number of for-hire vehicles operating in New York City more than doubled, and almost two-thirds of them are now Uber cars. As a rider trying to get uptown quickly, that sucks, unless your favorite pastime is watching pedestrians beat you. Ooh, look at that one go. She’s got a cane! But imagine being a driver. Like Doug Schifter. Schifter had been a limo driver since the ’80s. And in early February, he shot and killed himself outside City Hall in Manhattan in what seemed to be an act of exasperation at the industry he built a career in. In a Facebook post, he said he could no longer make ends meet, even when working 100 hours a week. On top of that, he felt let down by New York City’s politicians for failing to regulate, and corporate execs for not caring. And his sentiments are echoed by taxicab drivers too. “Asafo Addai has been driving for 27 years. And he says thanks to Uber, he now has nothing to show for it. ‘I don’t have a life. I work 12 hours a day. I pretty much work just to survive.’ ” OK. But Uber says they give drivers flexibility: Take the day off … or … pay rent. Disrupt. All right, let’s ask tech. Listen to former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick justify his work: “We look at all of the cities and we know that the transportation systems there are just not they’re not serving everybody’s needs. Even here in New York, with a great mass transit system, there’s still 2.5 million cars going over those bridges every day. We just believe we can help the city do better.” “By building another bridge and donating to the MTA. [laughs] I’m just playing, we’re adding more cars and making tons of dough!” Still, Kalanick, although an unmitigated douchebag, is unfortunately not wrong. Because many mass transit systems, including the New York Subway, are sorely neglected. It’s so bad that Pizza Rat was the best thing to happen to the New York subway in decades. I’m surprised the MTA didn’t just make it its mascot. But fixing what the government hasn’t is something Big Tech constantly claims it does. Politicians have failed you, the economy has failed you. And rather than change it, tech says they’re here to help. “I was pretty much just struggling to make ends meet.” “In and out of work.” “I couldn’t pay my mortgage.” “I was having a lot of difficulty.” “When I finally came to Uber, it was probably the best thing that’s happened.” “Airbnb can give us an extra income to help us survive a little bit better.” “In the past decade wages have pretty much stayed the same while costs have gone up.” “Driver with Uber, and put a dollar sign in front of your odometer. Like this guy:” “Technically, I’m a cook.” Yeah, technically he’s a cook but since there’s no stability in the restaurant industry, he’s gotta drive drunk 23-year-olds around and hope they don’t puke in his car. Now sure, renting your place on Airbnb or driving for ride-hail companies might be solid temporary fixes. But when they go unregulated, these precarious jobs don’t become the disruption in the market, they make precarious jobs the rule of the market. Which is how you get a worsening of the housing crisis and the destruction of taxis, and the reason you can’t stay in your childhood bedroom when you go home for Thanksgiving because it’s now a “suburban oasis.” Really, Mom?! At a time when we have more income inequality than since before the Great Depression, the services these apps provide are overwhelmingly being used by people who are wealthier, making you wonder if these companies are helping to close the income gap, or prying it wide open. Tech isn’t here to help you survive the vampire bite of capitalism – it’s here to find new space on your neck. And of course, since Big Tech is so gallantly stepping in to profit off of the government and our economy’s failures, it only makes sense that one company is trying to tackle the biggest failure of them all. “Amazon is at it again, and this could be a game changer for healthcare. Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway and JPMorgan Chase are forming an independent healthcare company for its employees.” Great idea! ‘Cause there’s no reason to think that the employees you overwork and underpay would be undercared for by your healthcare. By the way, you’re not a health care company! How much you wanna bet Amazon’s coverage is just to cover people in bubble wrap. “And you can pop some of those bubbles to distract you from the pain!” Disrupt healthcare!!!! [dub-step music] But just because these companies want to own more and more of our lives doesn’t mean they should be able to. Which brings us to the “R” word, the word that makes every Fox News host shudder. Regulation. Listen to how this conservative pundit argues against regulating the unfettered use of drones. “You’re asking the government to get involved and to be the one to regulate what’s going on about technology? I agree with you, I don’t want them flying on my head. But I’m gonna get a helmet. I have little kids, they love the drones, there’s nothing you can do about it.” Yeah, get a helmet! That’s what being an American is all about, having needless workarounds for easily regulatable tragedies, I got my drone helmet, my acid rain helmet, my stray bullet helmet, my rape helmet, my oil spill in the drinking water helmet, and my night on the town helmet. Sup. But despite the legions of lobbyists hired by tech companies to fight laws restricting them, cities and states have started to regulate. Cities like London, Seattle, Baltimore, Detroit and Vancouver have been placing taxes and restrictions on short-term rental services like Airbnb. Berlin was able to bring back 8,000 housing units to the market. And ride-hailing services have been limited, taxed and subjected to more oversight in states like Michigan, Massachusetts and Texas, which will help raise driver wages, reduce traffic and bring more money to those states. Because not all disruption is a bad thing. Uber and Lyft probably prevent a lot of driving drunk, and one time I stayed in a treehouse in Nashville. It was awesome. But maybe it’s time to rethink how tech isn’t fixing our real problems. Instead, it’s a bandaid falling off the gaping wound left by the thing we should disrupt most of all: that vampire called capitalism. Thanks again for watching Newsbroke, I’m Francesca Fiorentini, follow me on Twitter. And please share this video with your network to give them a more thorough picture of the effects of the apps they might be using everyday. And also will you please go to our review page and give us a 5-star review on Facebook Watch? Because the trolls … they come out. “This is my fact helmet and you’re wearing a shirt that says feminist and I feel threatened. One star.” So thank you for giving us a review, and we’ll see you next week.

100 Comments on "How Tech Giants Feed Off Capitalism’s Failures"


  1. i want uber drivers to get paid more but DON'T laud nyc's taxi service to any black person. getting passed up by cabs just for being black (there's enough research on this, its in arguable) was frustrating as fuck! now i can just hail a cab and now i'm going to get picked up no matter what. so fuck the nyc taxi service. they can burn down for all i care.

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  2. Excellent work.This is for you Newsbroke. Life as we make it.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eAVZsRTKSvI

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  3. Great video! My only suggestion would be that the "disrupt that vampire called capitalism" conclusion produces many unanswered questions, even suggesting you propse going full communist.. Perhaps something more specific like "disrupt neoliberalism" or "disrupt our corporate overlords"

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  4. These are all great points and news broke is a great series. I just hope they pay for Frani’s chiropractor. She leans left for 10 straight minutes!!

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  5. As much fun as Fiona is (given the topics), she's just preachin'' to the choir. Ditto TYT & a lot of other liberal/progressive channels.

    What we really need are channels that genuinely appeal to conservatives, but which presents these facts and arguments in a way that they will support them.

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  6. Hi, have you seen the latest propaganda campaign of Turkey? They flood YouTube with ads that look like documentary…

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  7. The difference between "capitalism" and "corporatism" is that capitalists recognize that limitations (regulations) are necessary. Corporatism doesn't. Is part of why we need to choose our words carefully. Know what we're saying, and say what we mean.

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  8. that's because tech giants was born from a crashed economy and now thrives and adapted to bad economies, so if the economy got stronger better, the tech giants loses money as people would actually have money to leave their house, so what's the solution? you keep the economy broken so you don't lose money

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  9. Amazon creating sects, that is after exploiting the US post office, assumes they are doing the right thing.
    Its like a game, how far down can their integrity go???

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  10. OMG new companies are creating competition!! If companies in the industry can't handle new competition, they need to change or close shop. Boy, that was easy!

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  11. People prefer using Uber because of its lower price and more personable service. But if it ruins the taxi industry… I suppose it is bad. I think I may discard my mobile phone for disrupting the letter industry.

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  12. I love your channel but I can tell you in Florida we have virtually no mass transit and our taxis used to be so awful it would take 3 hours for a vomit filled junk heap to find you, if they did at all. Taxi companies had a strangle hold on each county too so there was virtually zero choices. Many many times I was stranded without a taxi when I needed one to get home. Imagine that: you are drunk, the bar closed and you are on the street too drunk to drive and no taxi arrives at all, no mass transit to ride, you just stuck.

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  13. Wow. What a fucking idiot.

    I don't even get how a moron like this doesn't die because she forgets to breathe.

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  14. Do they put the camera behind a pillar or something? It's a weird reporting style to be leaning right as if you're talking across a crowded cafe.

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  15. Such a lovely sunshine, and feminist already…You are a perfect denial of “ oppression”, fitting well in masculine, evil world of using tech…

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  16. Al Jazeera posting a video about disrupting the rental economy. Gee what demographic do I remember seeing driving taxis and renting out slums??? Probably just a coincidence.

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  17. I agree with most of the sentiments in this video, but stop when it comes to the Taxi industry! These Cab companies ,in NY & Chicago at least, were nothing more than crony capitalist cartels that relied on and exploited illegal immigrant drivers, charging ridiculous fares in the process! I'm sure Uber and Lyft have their problems, but from a consumers pov they have brought down prices substantially! Two sides to the story!

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  18. Innovation is important. That and capitalism are the only things that lifts people out of poverty and improve their quality of life. There is no better system – while not perfect, its the very best we have. The problem happens with corruption and monopolies. The innovation in the ride-sharing (aka new taxis) was the convenient app. The rest, was Uber breaking the law and hiring lobbying groups to delay the inevitable. The fact that large corporations are able to buy government support to keep out start ups from disrupting them back, is the real challenge here.
    However, I would say that I am very sensitive to disruption in terms of people losing work and I have done some research on it. Whenever there is a disruption, someone will have to take the hit and your options are: the government, private businesses or individuals. In the case of individuals, you need to save up some money to have a 'burn rate' of 3-5 months and you need to improve your personal skills (constantly) so that you can survive a disruption and even increase your earnings.

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  19. Corporations would rather provide a for-profit alternative for their own benefit than pay taxes toward the benefit of all. (And yes, its possible for corporations to do both things at the same time in 21st century America.)

    Likewise, wealthy parents would rather exclusively pay for private schools for their kids than pay taxes toward public schools for the benefit of all. Because: Knowledge = Power.

    Likewise, wealthy families would rather pay for private healthcare for their families than pay taxes toward mass healthcare for the benefit of all. Because: Health proves wealth.

    Can't feel like a winner unless you can see losers losing in your midst. Sad but true.

    If you don't believe many wealthy people think this way, then it means you have never been wealthy enough to look in the mirror and rationalize why its OK to have abundance while others die for lack of groceries, shelter, or a $100 life saving drug.

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  20. The questions? Is it time to disrupt the disputers? Indeed it is time. Most tech took the greed part of capitalism (even in communist countries) to atmospheric levels to make Professor Friedman squeamish.

    The fix? Employee owned companies and Co-Ops. Entrepreneurs have to aspire to something other than being the boss with the most money, power, stuff and gah gah sycophantic followers.

    The way ?- Just like we do everything else to create populist sentiment, make it cool to be non-greedy and uncool to be a materialistic slob.

    We need web site like yours, media outlets across the spectrum to expose just how these disruptive are crushing us, enriching a few, increasing the suffering and misery of millions, and making us all accomplices in the crime.

    Business owner? Dont be, be a business partner

    Bad ass MBA smart ass? Don't be – come over to the other side and help EOBs and Co-Ops to compete against the establishment

    Hot shot lobbyist lawyer? Don;t be – come over and work on legislation that removes their unfair advantage and at least level the playing field.

    Legislator or Judge propping up the oligarchs? Don't be – Reach out to the people, gain their trust by supporting laws that support the majority, not the oligarchy.

    Regional Banker sucking up to Manhattan – Don't suck – Work with with grass root CO-OP and EOBs and provide financing to enable their fnding and growth

    Material, computer, chemical, pharmaceutical, agro, industrial, process, system sciences hot shot? Don't waste your energy working for the oligarchs, Don't you see how you are shortchanged and being replaced world wide with cheaper, and cheaper and cheaper labor sources? Be a EOB and a Co-Op.

    Laborer, professional – stop dealing with the big company, and even the greedy small business owners who tell you how and why they need to make 10-100X more than you (isn't it obvious why – Hell no it's not), and don't be a victim of the hunt for higher profits for ME the owner! Be an owner. Or say hello to the new robot or next cheaper source of labor.

    College President – WTH are you doing? Teach stuff that matters, so we graduated kids that give a damn. Lower you frikkin prices and start paying your NCAA athletes, not the damn coaches and athletic directors.

    K-12 administrators and county budgeteers – WTH? HELP! HELP! HELP!

    Federal Government – 70% of our budget goes to defense, intelligence, and law enforcement. Cut it in half, and in four years by another half. End the wars, bring the troops home (let the Navy keep sailing, Ok, I liked it when I was a sailor). Aint no boogie man out there. Put the money into work programs that train, efface and enable us, da peeps. Fund projects just for EOBs and Co-Ops.

    After that you can reform immigration law so it stops favoring the oligarch and starts favoring what has always powered America – immigrants.

    You get it right?

    NewsBroke -Class is in session – Get teaching, and stop jokin (so much)

    Let's go!

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  21. Capitalism is a social system based on the recognition of individual rights, including property rights, in which all property is privately owned.

    The recognition of individual rights entails the banishment of physical force from human relationships: basically, rights can be violated only by means of force. In a capitalist society, no man or group may initiate the use of physical force against others. The only function of the government, in such a society, is the task of protecting man’s rights, i.e., the task of protecting him from physical force; the government acts as the agent of man’s right of self-defense, and may use force only in retaliation and only against those who initiate its use; thus the government is the means of placing the retaliatory use of force under objective control.

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  22. Please don't promote suicide in face of economic distress. News of suicide encourage more suicide. http://www.badscience.net/2009/03/suicide/

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  23. I honestly don't feel bad. It's not up to tech companies to be, "fair" to older business. They either compete or they die. I'd put more blame on older business not wanting to change and continue to exploit their employees the way they always have. Government is to blame just as much if not more.

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  24. Regulation is necessary, not to protect the market from disruption, but to protect our rights and to prevent misinformation and fraud.

    As for the market disruption, it's simply inevitable. Invention of bronze disrupt stone age civilization as iron later disrupt bronze. We don't want to halt progress, if anything, we should speed it up.

    Sure, someone somewhere might find themselves left behind, but such is the cost for progress. The benefit far outweight the cost, because this will bring better life for thousands more.

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  25. There is no "disruption" here. Just capitalists creating more problems by feeding off all the other problems capitalism created in the first place. It's business as usual.

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  26. Wow a "news" channel owned by a country that still has slavery and sharia law claiming capitalism is bad, big surprise!

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  27. I am pro women's rights such as the right to choose, equal pay, equality with men but don't consider myself a feminist because it seems they are more concerned with hating men then equality.

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  28. The Amazon part confuses me, I work at one of their warehouses, and sure it's terrible, but the benefits are actually pretty damn good.

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  29. like it…well done..and now i'll watch the rich 'want to keep you dumb' post..good stuff

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  30. "A basic principle of modern state capitalism is that costs and risks are socialized to the extent possible, while profit is privatized. — Noam Chomsky

    “[T]he tattering of the American Dream is causing individuals who expected more out of life to self-destruct in record numbers. In my mind, there is a connection between the skyrocketing suicides, drug addiction, and binge drinking we’re seeing across the country and the fact that Americans are struggling so much financially. As the divide between the 'haves' and 'have nots' grows ever wider, one could assume that 99% of the population feel that overcoming economic inequality is insurmountable. Many Americans are hopeless and resigned to the fact that they may never live the American Dream or become part of the 1%.
    — Christopher Bergland, Psychology Today, May 6, 2016

    Is the American Dream killing us? American culture emphasizes striving for and achieving economic success. In practice, realizing the American Dream is the standard of success, vague though it is. It surely includes homeownership, modest financial and job security, and a bright outlook for our children. When striving accomplishes these goals, it strengthens a sense of accomplishment and self-worth. But when the striving falters and fails — when the American Dream becomes unattainable — it’s a judgment on our lives. By our late 40s or 50s, the reckoning is on us. It’s harder to do then what we might have done earlier. We become hostage to unrealized hopes. More Americans are now in this precarious position. Our obsession with the American Dream measures our ambition — and anger. …[Death rates of middle-aged whites have gotten worse, mainly those with a high school diploma or less.] … The main causes of rising death rates among non-Hispanic whites 50 to 54, men and women, are so-called “deaths of despair” — suicides, drug overdoses and the consequences of heavy drinking. … The central problem is a “steady deterioration in job opportunities for people with low education.” One setback leads to another. Poor skills result in poor jobs with low pay and spotty security. Workers with lousy jobs are poor marriage candidates; marriage rates decline. Cohabitation thrives, but these relationships often break down. “As a result,” write Case and Deaton, “more men lose regular contact with their children, which is bad for them, and bad for the children.”
    — Robert J. Samuelson, economist, Washington Post, April 2, 2017

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  31. Capitalism gives you the opportunity to start your own company and freedom to support or boycott someone's else company. Socialism is basically a company, which dominates the competition and is impossible to boycott, as it lives of your tax money.

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  32. When you say "regulation" what you really mean is: point guns at people and tell them what to do. Tell me I'm wrong.

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  33. It requires a profound ignorance of both history and economics to be compelled by any of this.

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  34. she's a socialist and will not stop until you give her your stuff, it doesn't matter if she earned it, remember she's a Socialist, it just what they do!

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  35. Let me tell you something. I'm a progressive through and through, but I came from dirt poor. I'm an Army vet who came home to a poor rural town with nothing but farming and factory jobs. They were brutal hours and terrible conditions and shitty pay. Eventually, I ended up homeless. After I got two degrees in tech, I ended up now working for the second largest software company in the world and I'm pulling 6 figures easy, working from home full time. The way I see it, tech industry is the future, just like when the industrial revolution made agriculture much less relevant many decades ago. If people don't adapt, they will suffer for it. Maybe it's good, maybe it's not, but it's reality and if we want to make sure that things are BETTER, it's up to us to make sure it is. But if it weren't for me being able to adapt to this industry, I'd have probably committed suicide many years ago and wouldn't be here typing this now, much less being able to provide for a family of three little boys. So yes, we will always have issues we need to address to make sure that the system is working for everyone, and everyone is investing in the system. But I'm sorry, I can't bite the hand that feeds in this case.

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  36. Bahaha, the Socialist is demonizing innovation because she knows that under Socialism there wont be anymore innovation. BTW, the reason why taxi cab drivers can't make a living is because the government is taking the majority of their money in fees and taxes. You got to love Socialism and Socialists and the BS lies they tell. They tell you how great their system is while sneaking their hands in your pockets and blaming the other guy for it.

    Also, it's funny that this moron is using a great innovative tool, like Youtube, to get her message across. If she actually believed in what she preaches then she will shut off her Youtube channel, get rid of her computer, and put her message in a news paper. Look at how many people in the news paper industry she put out of jobs and are now starving. Remember, if you are going to hate Capitalism then you have to hate all that Capitalism gives you, not just the parts you don't use.

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  37. History, despite the unique details of any given time, era, epoch, is repeating cycles; ever wondered what feudalism was like, kids…? Well get ready, your gonna find out and it will leave you with a gaping crater where your arsehole used to be.

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  38. I'm surprised that Amazon hasn't created its own currency yet.
    Will it be Google, Facebook, or Microsoft that wins the bid when Republicans privatize the NSA?
    For nearly a decade I've wondered when WalMart will win the bid to provide what was once Public Education.
    I would really love to see Newsbroke talk about how automation is expected to eliminate the need for the workers of 70,000,000 jobs in America in the next 20 years, that the Trump administration is doing nothing about it, and that soon half of the workers of the world may not have a source of income. When things get bad, will tech companies send robots to kill us?

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  39. I love a lot of what this channel provides but at the end of the day its learning to adapt and move forward. Its like VHS tape producing companies crying because DVDs are mainstream. If you drive a Taxi and uber came out, find another career. Iv learned new trades when old ones didnt work out for me.

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  40. Disrupting means doing things in a different way than things were done in the past . For example when automobiles were widely affordable to the general public it must have disrupted the carriage industry and put the people in the carriage industry out of work because few people used the horse and carriage mode of transportation .Of course Governments with all their wisdom will try to prop up the carriage industry to "save jobs" . But in the end the carriage industry will fail and the car manufacturing industry will take its place

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  41. The problem with capitalism is the dichotomous thought people view. Many distinguish capitalism from progressive economics. Yet capitalism is still a monetary business economy. It's like calling conservative and big corporations capitalism and progressive capitalism socialism. It's all the same yet we basically call some capitalism bad and accept a lot of it, that is bias. In some ways, prejudice is the negative side of this thinking. Dishonesty can be vile or horrible but most people believe and spread lies. Thus it is with America's economy. We hate and fear too much without the understanding. And we always claim more than we understand. This is something to consider.

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  42. Francesca is still one of the strongest minds. She is like a Jordan Peterson of the social left. Yet persuasive supported rhetoric is just convincing talk. It fails its purpose when containing lies and one-sided obsession. A fanatic is oppositional to a hypocrite yet hypercritical and one-sided. Literally, you need to see good where it is not where you want it to be. I have faith in this woman. I have similar faith in God. Yet humans are so fallible.

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  43. I agree that these services have issues and are causing problems but to only focus on the problems as an argument that these services should be abolished or whatever is, dare I say, a bit bourgeois. For example with uber. Uber is a really big life saver for people like me who work too late into the night to catch a bus home and can't afford a car. If I had a to take a taxi home I'd never be able to afford all my bills. Every time I had to take a taxi in the past it was only because I was really desperate and I felt like I was being wallet raped every time because of how insanely expensive it was just to be driven a few miles. Also the uber drivers themselves who are struggling have an option to earn a little extra cash without having to commit to a full time job on top of the full time job they already probably do just to make ends meet. Once again this can be the difference between living comfortably and being homeless for the working class. I actually have close friends who were saved from being homeless by working for uber a few hours a week. No joke. Even when you mentioned the background checks problem it made me think how limited the job market is for ex felons, and how if they are able to do an honest job without resorting to doing something illegal again just to survive then I really have a hard time being against former criminals being allowed to work for a company. Also with AirBnB the people who use it and who rent out their own private space with it are often strapped for cash themselves. The traveller is just trying to travel without going broke, and the renter is typically already paying an unfair price to their landlord for their housing so why shouldn't they be able to rent out a little bit of their space that they are already paying too much to live in so they can meet new people and have a better quality of life on top? It's the fucking landlords who decide they will change everything to AirBnB so that they can kick out the tenants and charge more. I guess all I'm saying is don't blame the tenants. It's the landlords who are the problem here. Granted, none of these things would be a problem in the first place if we just had more rent controls, fair wages for low income earners, better public transportation options, and weren't so harsh on ex criminals in the job market, but until we accomplish all those things(which will take a long time) do realize that the story of these tech/sharing services is not as black and white as leftist youtube has been making it out to be. For the time being these services remain a lifeline to a large portion of the working class.

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  44. I love your shirt and I’m loving these videos. I wish I had found them sooner, I’m super bummed that you’re not going to keep going. 😢💔

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  45. On the one hand, America perpetually exists on the cusp of unabashed dystopia wherein megacorporations are essentially gods, and indeed, many citizens are already in that black hole of misery, but on the other, I am interested to see the future where everyone wears Big Tech Iron Man suits to survive the countless hazards flying around, aside from the part where the poorest 60% of people won't be able to afford them and will all die horribly within months.

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  46. uber is simply a middle man that takes it's share. when someone is a taxi driver, the taxi station is his or her employer and has legal obligations toward the employee.

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  47. Uber and Lyft is not just about drunk driving, it is also about parking, letting dense restaurant districts accommodate more patrons.

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  48. WOW this is the first video I have seen that I respectfully half disagree with you. There successful because the old way doing things wasn't working.

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  49. I don’t feel bad even a little for taxi drivers. I’m sorry you can’t charge me $20 for an 8 minute drive.

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  50. I think the biggest problem is people's inability to use these technologies to their advantage. The problem stemming from the fact that Americans are being overworked. So instead of old things being replaced, new stuff just becomes junk.

    I leave it with the idea that the true benefactors of American technology aren't American.

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  51. Yeah, those radical right-wing, flat-earth religious zealot tech CEOs…
    No?.. Obviously not.

    Do people know what the Macintosh symbol represents?.. We were given a hint in the price of the first Apple computer. $666.

    "Stockholm syndrome is a condition which causes hostages to develop a psychological alliance with their captors during captivity."

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  52. Excellent reporting. I’m technical myself and i’m disgusted by google, amazon, uber, air bnb, microscum, and faecesbook. It’s all a buncha bs. Unregulated capitalism.

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  53. AirBnB was a great idea despite its minor effects of housing in big gentrified cities. Hotels have been fucking people for years and the cost of rooms is unfathomable now. Hotels think it’s okay to charge 700 for a night. Why? Because people working for massive corporations are the main clientele and they expense it. So hotels have realized they can charge lots because their main clients will pay. Regular people, however, can’t.

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  54. A very interesting topic.New tech might be helpful to consumers but can take someone opportunity. therefore disrupting somebody's when unable to make a living from that opportunity.

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