Is GERMAN REUNIFICATION a model for the KOREAS? – VisualPolitik EN

Is GERMAN REUNIFICATION a model for the KOREAS? – VisualPolitik EN


Here’s the question everybody’s been wondering for the past few days: what would happen if both North Korea and South Korea merged into a one single nation? Yes, I know this isn’t something that should
happen in the near future. But it certainly is a possibility–and one that might happen sooner
than we expect. Just one year ago, nobody would have predicted
that now, in spring 2018, Kim Jong-un would shake hands with the South Korean president, Moon Jae-in. So what would a Korean reunification would
look like? The truth is, there is a historical precedent
for all of this. Yes, my dear viewers, I’m talking about
the GERMAN reunification. As you may remember, Germany used to be divided
into two blocs: the Eastern bloc, with a socialist regime and the Western bloc, with a capitalist system. Then the Berlin wall came down and East Germany
got absorbed by West Germany. Since then, the Government has spent lots of money so that Eastern Germans
can enjoy a similar lifestyle to the wealthier Western Germans. Many experts consider this as a success story. Some of them claim that this could be a model
for a would-be integration of North and South Korea. Think about it. In both cases there’s capitalist and socialist
section. In both cases, one of the sides is poor while the other is much wealthier. And in both cases, they share a common language,
history and culture. But now the question is… was the German
reunification as successful as it looks on paper? Can we say Eastern Germans today are doing as well as
their Western neighbors? Well, the answer is… no. Even in soccer, we can see small differences. Since Germany was reunited there have been no eastern teams in the Bundesliga
since 2009. The western teams still dominate the national sport. The same applies to economics. But where the differences turn more scary
is when we talk about politics. For example, in the latest election, the radical
rightwing AfD has entered the parliament as the third- largest party. This radical, anti-immigrant and Eurosceptic
party has gained the majority of its votes in the regions of the former East Germany. This marked the first time since 1961 that
a far-right party has had this kind of presence in parliament. And that, dear viewers, is frightening. ‘Revenge of the East’? How anger in the former GDR helped the AfD So, the real question here is: is the process
of reunification done? What can we learn from Germany that could be applied to North and South Korea? Today we’re going to answer this question
but first, let’s take a look back at history. TO THE VICTORS GO THE SPOILS
After its unconditional surrender, the Allies divided Germany into four military occupation
zones – Britain in the northwest, France in the southwest,
the USA in the south and the Soviet Union in the east. There’s so much more to be said about this
but we’re not going to go into every little detail, because if we did, you’d be staring at my face for
a couple of hours!! … but suffice it to say that from 1949,
Germany was transformed into two different countries: West Germany, officially known as the Federal Republic
of Germany, with Bonn as its capital, and East Germany, whose official name was the Democratic Republic
of Germany, with its capital in East Berlin. So East Germany was the communist region while
West Germany became the embodiment of its capitalist occupants. While West Berlin started to look more and
more like a big city would in the United States, East Berlin became Moscow’s carbon copy. According to East Germany’s first constitution,
its citizens enjoyed certain basic rights, even the right to strike. In reality, however, there was little freedom. All policy-related matters were decided by
the Politburo, the executive committee of the Socialist Unity Party. And the main and, almost, the only source
of information in the country was directly financed by the only party. Here you can see an example of how ´unbiased´
it was. New Germany. Central organ of the socialist unity party. Celebrating 100 years of Communist Manifesto. Eastern Germany’s economy, as you may have
already guessed, was centrally planned and almost completely owned by the state. The central government set the prices of housing,
basic goods and even services. So, basically, every year the government would
publish a list with the mandatory prices of every basic good you wanted to buy. A bread roll? 5 marks, 1000 marks for a Sony Walkman and
so on and so forth. Even if you had the money, there were waiting
lists in place for goods like cars and electronics… would you like having to wait 10 years for a Trabant
car? Take the unemployment generated by the strict
price-control, take all those empty supermarkets, take the scarcity of primary basic goods, pair those
elements with a low birth rate …aaand what do you get?? You get lots and lots of people wanting to escape
East Germany. So, what did the Eastern German government
do? Well.. they.. built a wall to stop people
from leaving the country. In order to justify this move, the official
state propaganda claimed that they would build the wall to protect their country from ‘FASCIST infiltration’. But the actual reason was exactly the opposite. As you can imagine, what with having a literal
wall between them, the relationship between East and West Germany was not exactly friendly. In fact, West Germany didn’t even recognize
the Eastern Government because they claimed to be the only legitimate state for all Germans. And the East did the same thing. Does that remind you of something? Yes, this is, more or less, the same relationship
that the Koreas had with each other, although in the German case
there were no nuclear bombs involved. And just like North and South Korea are reaching
an agreement, East and West Germany normalized their relations in the 70’s. But the real twist in history came in the
year 1989. At the beginning of 1989, almost no one could
have anticipated that the 40th anniversary of the GDR would also be its last and that Germany would be
reunited once more. But then, history found a way to surprise us all. The speed at which these changes occurred
was astounding: only ten months after the fall of the Wall, East and West Germany would become a one single
nation. ”The new Germany is here,” Secretary of
State James A. Baker 3d said. ”Let our legacy be that after 45 years, we finally got the political arithmetic
right. Two plus four adds up to one Germany in a
Europe whole and free.” But make no mistake, this was not a merger
between two countries. This was a complete absorption. Basically, on October 3rd, 1990, East Germany
disappeared as an independent country and became part of West Germany. And this was definitely a good move. But, it has some downsides. REUNITED AT LAST
So the two states were one once more, but not everything was sunshine and rainbows. While West Germany was extremely wealthy,
had high productivity and was very industrialized, East Germany was the opposite: the soviet-controlled state
had lower productivity, less wealth and a totally different political system. Again, this was a very similar starting point
to that of North and South Korea, although less extreme. For the process to be successful, the two
states needed to somehow find a way to unify these two completely different structures. So what did they do? Well, basically, West Germany exported all
their laws, taxes and regulations to East Germany. In exchange, they also took care of all the
infrastructure costs: this means that the Western taxpayers would pay for the highways, railroads and
streets of Eastern Germany. And I know what you might be thinking now…
it sounds fair, right? If you wanna join your poorer neighbour to create a bigger country, you have to help
them recover. But… economy is way more complicated than
just pouring money where it’s needed. Basically, this reunification meant the total
collapse of the whole Eastern Economy. Why? Well, think about it! Having a single country means having a single
market, too. A single market where Western companies were several times more productive than the Eastern
ones. So, again, Eastern factories could not compete. For example, East Germany produced the famous
TRABANT car. Compared with a BMW or an Audi, a Trabant
is just a toy. So the demand for these cars just dropped by the day. Many refugees hoping to settle in the west
dump their communist built vehicles near the West Germany embassy in Prague. So imagine the situation: you work in a Trabant
factory, but the company has to close because nobody buys their cars. Then again, you go to the supermarket and
everything you want to buy is produced in the West because they have the best factories. But, then again, everything is more and more
expensive because… Surprise! All of a sudden, you live in a rich country with high prices. And this isn’t the end of the story! Imagine that you’re an old man in the East
and you get a pension that’s calculated based on the prices during
communist times. But now it’s 1990, and you go to the supermarket and the bread has a Western price,
which is triple… well… you see where I’m going with this. Young people at least could emigrate, and
believe me, they did. But what could the elderly do? And hold on just a second because on the top
of all that we had the currency exchanges! You see, the two countries had different currencies,
with different values. So, how did they make it work? The finance ministers of Eastern and Western
Germany met in a room and decided a fixed exchange rate between the West German mark and the
East German Mark. The public demanded a one to one exchange
and on July 1, 1990 the banks in the former Eastern Germany provided people with the unbelievable exchange
rate of “1:1” *do quote marks with hands*. I say this with quote marks because… the
theory was one thing, and reality was another. Most of the banks would sell you one western mark for 2 eastern
ones. This is an exchange rate of 2 to 1. And on the black market, that exchange rate would range anywhere
from 8 to 1 to 12 to 1. So from one day to the next, all the money
that you had in your savings would lose more than half of its value. So now you might wonder… How did the German government manage this
situation? Well, the answer is: subsidies, subsidies, and more subsidies. West Germany taxpayers paid medical bills,
infrastructure, and was doing everything it could to prevent Eastern Germans from migrating. We’re talking about almost 70 billion US
dollars every year since 1990… That is the equivalent of organizing 4 Olympic
games every year. So I know what you’re wondering now… after
almost 30 years… is the reunification process done? Can we say Germany is an equal country? Well, my dear viewers, the answer is yes…
and no. TOGETHER BUT NOT MIXED
According to one study, a good share of Germans state that they wouldn’t marry somebody
from the ‘other’ Germany. Three Quarters of the German population think
there are still different mentalities between East and West. And 10 percent of Eastern Germans have never
once travelled to the other side. And, of course, there are still differences
in economic terms, if you look at this chart, you will see that, at the time of the reunification the
GDP per capita in the East was 9400€, as opposed to 22000€ in the West. Today it’s 27.000 € and 41.000 €. Yes,
the differences are more subtle but nobody can seriously claim there are no differences. And, of course, we still have the cultural
differences. A research study by Jacob University in Bremen measured community spirit considering a number
of factors, including trust in institutions and tolerance towards the LGBTQ community and ethnic minorities. All the regions that once made up East Germany appeared in the bottom half of the index. And, finally, we have the political differences
that we can see in the latest elections. Eastern Germans voted for AfD, a far right wing party, and
Die Linke, a far left wing party, while Western Germans chose more moderate candidates. This divide in the polls shows how, still
to this day, Eastern Germans are heavily influenced by Russian politics. This is important because one day, Eastern
Germans could hijack German politics and destroy that sense of
German moderation. Going back to the Korean case, imagine what
would happen if North Koreans would kept voting for communist parties. So, all of a sudden, you had a leader like
Kim Jong-un making decisions that also affected the South Koreans. Sounds scary, right? Of course, there are many bright sides to
the German reunification. And, as we’ve mentioned in many of our videos here at VisualPolitik, Germany
is still a model for other countries. But, as we always say, not everything is perfect. And if there has to be a Korean reunification
one day, it will not come without risks. So now it’s your turn… Could the Eastern Germans radicalize the political
debate in Germany? Do you still feel that German reunification should be a
model for the Korean peninsula? Please, leave your answer in the comment section below. And of course, don’t forget to visit our
friends from RECONSIDER MEDIA.Com, the podcast that provided the voices in this video that are not mine. If you liked this video, we publish brand
new ones every week so hit that subscribe button and you won’t miss a single post. And as always, I’ll see you next time!

100 Comments on "Is GERMAN REUNIFICATION a model for the KOREAS? – VisualPolitik EN"


  1. The thing that South Korea, West Germany and Japan had after the war was US investment and support, I cannot believe that the US even without Kim Jong Un would support the North.

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  2. It's more difficult and more risky for two Koreas combine. NK has bigger land than SK, and half population of SK's, that's 2 times bigger than the proportion between East and West population in 1989.

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  3. N. Korea 25 million
    S. Korea 50 million
    I think in 50 years they can be same economically

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  4. You have been fooled by german political propaganda. The AfD is by far not the radical right party the established (left-wing) parties (which control the media) wants you to believe.

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  5. There are great similarities, but the difference between North and South Korea compared to West and East Germany is too extreme to compare them. East Germans weren't as poor North Koreans and far less indoctrinated (even if idoctrinated).

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  6. well maybe the answer comes from an unexpected place, I mean China, the way they utilize capitalization might come in handy if someone wants to reunite the two countries with socialist and capitalist values, what I mean is that we have to sort of influence or encourage the socialist state to accept capitalization without just putting the weight on their heads just ask them nicely to do it by themselves and this might work, maybe. So what do you say?

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  7. East and West Germany should have remained seperate countries for 5 years more. But with a married financial and economic partnership. It would have made it easier to make East Germany wealthier.

    I think lessons were learned. And Korea will not reunite unless both peoples have a near-similar standard of living. North Korea will be made wealthier by South Korea but full unity will not be undertaken unless all North Koreans could afford Samsung phones.

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  8. Another problem in the German reunification was the low subsidies. Those little Companies in the east couldn’t compete with the strong capital companies of the West so that many rural companies died out and no industries could build in the east nor money could cumulate

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  9. Excellent analysis, S. Korea would have to invest a LOT to bring the North up to even semi equal standards. Also the cultrual differences are great, many N. Korean defectors find it very difficult to adjust to life in the south, their whold world view is so different and deeply ingrained from birth.

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  10. Tough?! At least they had western side of the country richer, not like in Poland for example.

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  11. The main difference is that the wall came down because USSR allowed it. They could no longer afford to keep the Eastern Bloc funded.

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  12. East German's are correct also about the Syrian immigration which has been a disaster. Making them seen like Nazi's is totally unfair.

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  13. North Korean's are not communist. They are part of a dictatorship. China for NK is not or even close to USSR with East Germany. The economic and education differences between NK and SK will be the main stumbling block.

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  14. Also, when it comes to GDP numbers, farmers also come out lower than people that live in Cities, however that does not really mean their standard of living is lower. Eastern Germany has much more farming that Western.

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  15. order divorce weak genuine thinking century mode great influence justice establish disaster.

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  16. There’s one major difference: geography. By the time the Berlin came down, Germany was distant from Soviet influence. The USSR was struggling and Poland was already an independent democracy. The East Germans had no choice but to reintegrate and West Germans had to support them. North Koreans do have other options. China is a friendly communist state to them and one of the most powerful countries in the world. There is a thriving ethnic Korean community over the border since well before the Korean War. Many North Koreans don’t know any other lifestyle and would flee from foreign-backed Southern “liberation”. They’ve been separated far longer than Germans and have separate identities. Similarly, younger South Koreans have little empathy for the North Korean people that they’ve never known and are not interested in their taxes funding reunification. There’s a very real possibility that this won’t be another East Germany and they’ll either let the North collapse or flood China with refugees. China knows this, it’s why they’ve been propping up the Kim regime for decades to avoid having to deal with the alternative. Japan has staged various invasions via Korea so they wouldn’t be pleased with US/SK/NATO forces occupying North Korean territory (again) either.

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  17. the east Germans wanted same lifestyle like the west. They said if the Mark (west-money) won't come to us we will go there. So reunification was a must after fall of the wall.

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  18. I don't know how many people seriously think Korean unification is still a possibility. The Kim regime wouldn't allow the North to simply be absorbed and many of the North Korean people worship their rulers as demi-gods. A Chinese/Vietnamese style opening up might be a more realistic hope, though true freedom will not exist for many decades.

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  19. There are too many enemies in Korea.
    China, Russia, Japan and the United States (?)
    These four countries do not want Korea to be unified.
    In particular, China and Japan are afraid that a unified Korea will become a great power in a few decades.

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  20. North Korea intends to launch a new economic model
    It is Singapore and Vietnam.
    North Korea will develop significantly if it receives economic support for China, South Korea, Japan, and the United States for decades. This economic support will naturally lead to unification.
    And Korea may become the world 's sixth largest power

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  21. Germany, in the person of Chancellor Kohl, took the wrong decision to unify the two currencies of West and East Germany at a pair change, one to one. That destroyed the entire industrial system of East Germany, put millions unemployed in a very short time and Western companies could devour Eastern brands for dimes.
    That's a mistake that Korea should avoid because it's at the base of the never succeeded German reunification, where the East is still struggling with per capita GDP that's 30% less that the West still now.
    How Germany deals with that? With a huge amount of subsidies and welfare so that the purchasing power in the East is somehow buffered.
    But a great help came to Germany thanks to the immense stupidity of then Le President Mitterand of France, who accepted the reunification if only Germany entered a common European currency. The Germans, smart people, immediately saw that they could hugely profit from that. Having a stronger industrial compound and geopolitical position, they accepted, knowing they were going to have oceanic profit from that.
    The Euro system morphed into a way through which German financial and industrial elites have driven down all European salaries to compete globally with China.
    And that's not all, folks.
    Germany enjoyed, and is enjoying, an artificially devalued currency, the Euro, which damaged the European periphery and competitors and let Germany achieve an enormous trade surplus without paying the price of a real federation, destroying in the process the competing industries in Southern Europe and gave the German elites the possibility to buy thousands of companies and brands for dime: the same game played in Eastern Germany.
    The German reunification is still now uncompleted and the covering of imbalances via subsidies is payed via the trade surplus. In other words, it wouldn't be wrong to say that a good chunk of German reunification has been payed by non-Germans sustaining the unfairness of the Euro system. And it wouldn't be wrong to define the policy of Germany in the last 20 years in Europe as geoeconomic imperialism.
    Let me be clear, I'm not against a common currency. I'm against a distorted system like the one that it's now running.
    A fair system would let the European countries decide between a common currency WITH ALL THE POLITICAL FEDERATION that should come with that, costs included (transferring wealth from Hamburg to Sevilla, as it happens from New York to Alabama) OR no Federation and no common currency, because there's no way for the periphery to compete in a fake and distorted common currency system without real European unification.
    Germany has it all without paying any cost and that's absolutely unfair and, by the way, it's infringing the same European treaties, which deny excess trade surplus.
    But accepting the cost of a real European Federation would mean that Germany won't be able to cover the reunification fiasco with welfare anymore so she will never ever accept that and, one day or another, the Euro will collapse under the weight of its contradictions and imbalances.

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  22. why is the caption of visualpolitik video always so shite? either incorrect, late or for some part not even have a subtitle?

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  23. It's amazing how just months before official reunification of Germany West Germany won the Football World Cup. I wonder why they didn't sent a unified teams or why FIFA didn't allow them to do it which would've been great politically & socially.
    Also, Jae-In in Moon Jae-In is pronounced as 'Jay/Je'.

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  24. It seems like being Conservative is seen as being backward. To not be easily enthused about mixing with other dissimilar from you is a personality trait really. There is an obvious risk to increasing islamisation in Europe. No harm in acknowledging this fear. To drag an argument is say, Kim Jong Un may one day be the leader of both Koreans is preposterous. N Koreans was out of the country! They've had enough of Communism and Dictatorship already. Why would they Vote him back in?

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  25. Limiting immigration makes you far right? Sounds like most of the world is far right. How ridiculous

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  26. Use the north korean system to it's advantage, use the low wages to launch massive build up campaign before integrating north korea into south. Your welcome!

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  27. I don’t know much about the morals in S.K. But we can hope they are not as bad as Germany, for that would be quite a transformation for N.K. At least those are my thoughts. Wish I had more knowledge about both of them.

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  28. How about no, Genosse W? It is not that easy. East did suffer a lot. And please tell mr. Cameramen to stop zooming in on your face, you are not that sexy. With respect Iva Bigbotty RAF pilot and former punching bag P.S. Aaaaaagghhh

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  29. Better ask the Chinese first.
    There will not be a reunification. Not until US military leaves East Asia.
    Give it another 31 years.

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  30. The Korean situation is not the same as the German.
    North Korea has the backing of a country with lots of US dollars.
    That's why KJU has to visit China three times.
    Nothing has changed much in the last thousand year between China and Korea.

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  31. So the people in east germany who really understand the horrors of big government ie european union=soviet union light, are bad people. Big government leftists, who ushered in the soviet union, cuba, and north korea and the current train wreck of venezuela are good people?! If you tried to overrun a middle eastern country and erase their culture, see how that works! Might be some backlash! Big citizen, small government OR big government, small citizen, these are the two choices.

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  32. ‪Reunification cannot occur conglomerates and regimes desired to derive #NorthKorea natural resources‬.

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  33. I would say the Irish would be a better model they managed to find peace between north and south they are still devided because of different political and religious reasons
    I don't think korea will be united soon

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  34. what is the vide name at 11:52 , is it part of a song ? where is that guy rising his fist saying  Authoritarian nationalist Dorks

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  35. "East Germany Socialist/Communist" what Capitalist propaganda is this, the NAZI's called themselves socialist but they certainly were not, I really hate this Strawmanning of Socialism by Capitalists.

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  36. Its a bad idea,south korea is doing okay,they should let their communist neighbors stay with kim regime,20yrs down the line,you will have a communist running the whole of korea which wont be good.

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  37. you think Kim jong un will willingly give up power? Germany reunification happened because USSR fell.

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  38. There´s one factor that´s not discussed in this video, former west germany states after the reunification not only payed for the east, they also benefited a great deal from educated eastern immigrants, put this in the context of an aging western germany while eastern germans were younger. This is something that´s similar in both Koreas where the south has a very low fertility while the north is much younger and could, in the case of a reunification, help the south a lot with young educated workers

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  39. I hate how YouTubers just give you bits of information at a time, forcing to watch their videos much longer than necessary. Its because YouTube pays people according to "retention time". But geez, this video could've been 3 mins max, but no. You turned it into 14 fucking mins

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  40. All people from the Goverment in east Germany all of them where fired. None of them had for life Time no right to work at any Kind of Goverment work.

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  41. Germany is hardly unique in having differences in economical success and political viewpoints in different regions. For instance just take a look at: the USA, Italy, Brazil, Spain, Belgium, etc. BTW having different economics tends to lead to different viewpoints and vice versa. My guess would be that it's a fairly common occurrence, so much so that I think it's difficult to find a country that is equally developed over it's entire territory. Economic success tends to strengthen the chance of future economic success. And if it is indeed so common then is it really fair to put it in the terms you put it in? Generally I have seen this phenomenon all over the world and it always seems to go with a certain mindset where the people of the economically more successful area see themselves as superior. While they see the people from the less successful area as uneducated/stupid and lazy. But as I see it it's just economics at work.

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  42. The hypothetical Korean reunification is an order of magnitude harder:
    – no one really wants it; North Korean regime does not want to relinquish power, South Koreans do not want to pay the burden for the people who, by this point, are foreign to them (North Korean refugees feel alien in South Korea); East Germany collapsed from inside and East Germans mostly wanted to join West Germany as quickly as possible – as other people who had been raised it the 'real socialism', they had rather unrealistic expectations regarding the transition to the market economy
    – China
    – the two Korean societies have been apart for much longer, isolation has been much tighter: East Germans could receive the western TV (except those who lived in "the valley of the clueless"), West Germans could visit East Germany, family ties were not broken; nothing like that in Korea
    – North Korea invaded South Korea – there is a memory of the full-fledged war
    – economic differences between the two are much, much bigger
    – East Germany was a typical Soviet-style communist dictatorship which looked like a 'freedom house' in comparison to North Korea – a totalitarian hereditary absolute monarchy with elements of feudalism

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  43. Umm South Koreans don’t want reunification. That’s why we keep offering money to NK so the regime can survive. Their collapse means one reunified Korea, and no one wants to cope with that cost of social integration, not only money, dealing with the underclass NK people. Not joking.

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  44. it's never happen because Asian mentality is very different compare to the west , the North korea leader never want to give up his power because he's scare for his life that people will get revenge when he give up his power , North And South will be end up like Vietnam , but this time i hope South Korea will win the war , otherwise they have to live in the misery just like the Southern Vietnamese , the life is under communist ruled is horrible .

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  45. South Korea is one of the most literate countries in the world, perhaps less like 1980s’ West Germany. And let’s not forget, it is also one of the most CONNECTED countries on the planet, rivaling even the United States. Are they happy with things on their side of the border right now? Generally, Yes. Is there any evidence for us to be able to say the same of their Northern brethren? Abso-bloody-lutely NOT. A present day Korean merger would thus have the benefit of knowledge that comes from hindsight (especially with lessons from German re-unification), have the increased value placed on human rights that is proven to come about with better education, and the tightest of scrutinies that comes about when the world watches you i.e. when you’re so well-connected and when your economy is so well integrated with the rest of the world. Korean reunification, in my view, may not be a walk in the park in the short term, but would definitely (if occurred) be better, more peaceful and more fruitful by leagues that it’s German counterpart.

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  46. How is the AfD radical? Surely the CDU party in Germany should be considered radical for their reckless immigration policies, not the AfD for simply wanting to keep the immigration from going out of control. Since when did "radical" equal keeping your country the same as it has been? Last time I checked keeping your country the same as it has been was called "Conservative" not radical.

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  47. Reunification would be the end of Han Minguk(Koreans). I would like to see some kind of reform in NK instead.

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  48. 9:28 I am with you on this one Simon. If I were that old man I would curse Capitalism to the eigth degree till it implodes.

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  49. While the situation of both South and North Korea might seem comparable to East and West Germany, another country divided by Cold War politics, there are some major differences which might be hard to understand. First, Germany did not have a civil war that resulted in millions of casualties, and both sides of Germany maintained a working relationship after the war while the relationship of both Koreas have been tense.

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  50. Hint for future videos: please compare Vietnam (even it had not experienced that long-lasting division – North and South, the differences are present). You also have Yemen to compare

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  51. you have really nice videos dude, but PLEASE show more images of the stuff you're talking about, and less of your close up face. We all think you're a good looking fella, but we're here for the interesting information mostly 😉

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  52. Germany has NOT been re-unified. The Treaty of Potsdam was NOT a peace treaty and neither was the 2+4 agreement. Germany's correct border is that as determined at the Treaty of Versailles, i.e. the so-called 1937 border, before the illegal Nazi annexations.

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  53. Why are you trying to look like a hipster bro? You’re not! Be who you are… you’ll be much better off! Cut the act!!!

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  54. There are a number of mistakes in the video:
    First, in the last general election the right wing party AfD did not gain the majority of its votes from regions which used to be East German. That is simply not the case. 68 % of the AfD voters came from parts which used to be Western Germany. Though it's true : the percentage of votes for the AfD was higher in the East, but one should not forget the former eastern part is far smaller than the former western part with even a far smaller population number since it is less densely populated. If one would only take the East German AfD votes in consideration, the party were not even able to pass the 5 % threshold which is required to get into parliament.
    Secondly, the birth rate in the GDR was fairly the same compared to West Germany and starting with the 1970's it was even higher.
    There was only a >literal wall< around West Berlin. East and West Germany were separated by a strip of land with fences, mines and guards.
    Furthermore, the exchange rate 1:1 was only good for a small amount of money per person, all the other money was exchanged at a rate of 1:2 .
    And please consider, it's one country now – for the the last 28 years: Everybody has to pay taxes for the common general budget of the government. Simply saying West Germans have to pay taxes for the East is just too short of a story, since the richer South Germany pays more into the budget, which the poorer North benefits from, too.
    It might be true, that 10 % of East Germans never visit the West (which I actually doubt), yet the number of West Germans never been to the East is much higher.
    And once again, the percentage of votes for the right wing AfD or the leftish Linke was higher in the Eastern part – still both parties together were not able to get the majority of votes in the East. Plus, still reminding there voters for these parties in the West as well. The statement that East Germans would hijack the political system is so far off from reality, where East Germans and East German topics play such a minor role.

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  55. The diffrences today are more due to West being a assylum paradise for arabs and turks.
    Muslims make out a big part in the west population.
    The East has had way less immigration and that was more from eastblock countries and cuba.
    Arabs Afrikans were new to East germany when they started comeing in the 90tys.
    East and west are not the same.
    Unemployment is much higher in the East.
    Most of the X-Kommi Companies just got closed and new companies that produce in the east are rar.
    Without production people dont have jobs. When they dont have job the are poor and cant buy stuff.
    The least thing they need then is gay rights or more migrants / hungry mouths and job competition.

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  56. North Koreans would never vote for another Kim. Koreans, from the North or the South, are polite and gentle people. The people from East Germany are the ex-Prussians: the harshest people Europe has ever produced. Adenauer considered the east of the Elbe river as part of Asia, they were different even in 1870.

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  57. The biggest difference is that Germany was split apart by foreigners, but Korea split itself apart. That's the major non-parallel that makes Korea's situation different.

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  58. It is not a really fair comparison. East Germany is not really a poor country, it is just not as wealthy as West Germany. But when the reunification occurs, the economy of WG almost crippled by the big and massive investment the govt made in the EG. In order to make EG competitive, the govt invested more than 2 trillion Euro (today's value) in between the 1990s to the year 2000. That is a lot of money. The whole German nation is united for a single cause : brotherhood. Wages did not increase for almost a decade and social security had been cut or curtailed to make the east competitive again. There are general fear and panic that everything will be just a lost cause and all the investments just went down the drain. Surprisingly, it works well for Germany. The money flow still happens now but the German economy is slightly better off than it used to be. Now theres no divide between the industrial city of Leipzig and the skyscrapers in the River Main.

    North Korea and South Korea are 2 different situation. NK had been isolated for so long that I think, making it competitive will not only cripple the SK economy, but also will take almost half a century. Brotherhood, same people and same language can only guide you so long before you actually complained about the horrendous amount of money that you have to spend to the other half of the country. The only possible way to actually rebuild and make NK competitive again is for the NK to be exploited. It sounds rude but that is the only way. NK natural resources is untouched for decades. I once read on a journal published by a PhD student in Sydney, the amount of natural resources in NK probably ranges from 10 trillion to 20 trillion dollars. The research probably inflated the numbers but if we are to take this correctly, it is more than enough for NK to rebuild itself and for both the Koreas to be a success story. SK has a big corporation and near 0 corruption govt that can handle this resources well before it is being auctioned to the highest bidder.

    But I do hope NK and SK can reunite again. Best wishes from Singapore. But there are other factors to consider. While most european countries want EG and WG to reunite (except for Thatcher), 2 super countries do not want to let go of NK, China and Russia. And China is certainly tigthening its grip in the NK economy, politic and ideology. In order for unification to occur, the regime had to be toppled down. And China shares a very long land border with NK. Or let the 2 countries go their separate ways like Austria and Germany.

    Maybe we can have Korea (SK) and Koryo (NK).

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  59. I think the eastern germans are anti communism or socialist political parties, hence why every old Russian state votes right wing

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  60. Economic risk and financial cost is much huge for North and South Korean as divided(it already has been). Price for unification will be much more than German unification cost but it still less costly than as being divided Korea. Politics are the most creative activities what human do. If German model is not the most practical one for Korean, there will be many variations of unification for Korean can do. Federal or modified 2 government system…whatever suitable. In the end it seems that Korean ethnicity is core of matter than just economic or ideology.

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  61. Well, to be fair. Cultural differences between Germans is not just between east and west but also between north and south, even between south and south (bavarian and swabian). Germany has a lot of subtle (and some not that subtle) internal cultural differences.I'm also not sure about what you said about the fear of immigrants. If I remember correctly you could see that the fear of immigrants was higher the smaller the fraction of immigrants living in that state was. The states with small immigrant  fraction (especially turks or muslim immigrants in general) just happen to be eastern german states because guest workers happened to be mostly from Italy, Greece and Turkey in West Germany but in East Germany most guest workers came from communist brother states.Edit: One has to  be careful about simplifying the immigrant topic in Germany. Today most anti immigrant supporters in Germany are not against immigrants in general but more against muslim immigrants. The AfD gets a lot of support from german russians, they even translated their program to russian.

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  62. You actually think the German AFD is scary? It is not scary at all. it is simply a conservative and nationalist party that wants to put the German people first and does not want Muslim immigration into Germany and Europe. They have their equivalents in Britain, France, Spain, Sweden, Poland, and other European countries. They are not neo-Nazis. Just people who want preserve their country, culture, faith, and society. You are such a neo-liberal.

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  63. The two Koreas are worlds apart in technology, infrastructure and culture. It will be a miracle if the two can slowly merge into a monolithic culture inside of 50 years. The cultures of the two Germanies were not that lost as there was still some cultural exchange despite the cold war separation. The brain washing and absolute cultural control in North Korea was far more severe than what East Germany endured.

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  64. How the f*ck is the AFD radical far-right to you??? They are much more similar to Trump who you call conservative, and the "Linke" is like Denmark or similar to Bernie Sanders. I may understand that you talk of radical right much earlier concerning us Germans than concerning you Americans because of our history, but the DDR really wasnt our fault.

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  65. Reunification….not going to happen, at least not until the North Korean regime falls. How do you unify with a country of hostages?

    How do you unify with a place that sends anyone who even remotely criticized the government to a concentration camp? North Korea is a tyrannical state and if their authorities ever allowed any and I mean any moderation in terms of human rights or freedoms that will be their end. Kim John Un and his ruling party knows this and they make it very clear to their people.

    Unfortunately Kim John Un and his ruling party are also hostages of the situation they themselves created. If the North Korean regime falls it would mean their end. A revolution in a place like NK will be very bloody and even if they mannaged to escape they will eventually be tracked down and dragged to some international criminal court where they will be found guilty of crimes against humanity.

    Nothing will change for ordinary North Koreans until their regime falls. And no reunification could even be conceivable until then

    Anyway thats my 2 cents

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  66. We(Korea) do have a lot of problem for reunification ,not only about the financials but international relations. There's a complicated, inconvenient truth that the westerners might not acknowledge, sadly which majority of government don't actually want us to be reunified. Well, even if those not considered, we still have tons of questions to be solved.

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  67. The German "reunification" was not a reunification at all. West Germany annexed East Germany (same flag, same long form name – "Federal Republic of Germany"). The DPRK elite is well aware of this, and in it they say the end to their way of life. They would not be wrong.

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  68. It’s not as easy as that. Most of the North Koreans who are loyal to the Kim Dynasty are the older generation, the younger don’t really care about the Kims. We might have to wait until the older generation of North Korean people and party officials like Kim Yong-nam and those alive and active during the years 1948-94 are dead before revolution can be brought about in the DPRK.

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  69. I think the Koreas can take notes and apply what works for their situation as rhe German one us very similar. I think the Koreas situation will be more complicated for sure, however .

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  70. NO CHANCE. China Communist Party will NOT let it happen. Maybe Kim get assassinated like his half brother. hehehe

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  71. Well, there's hope after all….

    Perhaps Alllll east Germans will choose Russian and German Orthodoxy if they have a chance to view Acts 15:19-20 of the Bible

    …and perhaps they will sell their shares of Germany, Inc. to God Almighty's Israeli friends of St. Elisha and just say, "To hell with it. !!!!!" .

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