Jamie Bogert MISSION Story Slam 2: Saving Democracy

Jamie Bogert MISSION Story Slam 2: Saving Democracy


[Percussive Music] Hi everyone. My name is Jamie Bogert and I am the Democratic Committee person for the 27th Ward 5th division. I say that with some confidence, some confidence now, especially because I have the blue
computer paper printout on my mother’s fridge to prove it. But just a few months ago I was not so confident. I kind of, pretty ungracefully, fell into this
political world, and I’m learning as I go. So, running for this position I, my
biggest supporter was Carson my neighbor who is 7 years old. Who when I said, “Would you support me if I ran for this?” He said, “What? Let’s play some soccer.” I ended up in a tie with Amy Gutmann of University of Pennsylvania, oddly. And the tiebreaker involved a coffee can and some bingo balls and I said, “That’s democracy?” So it was kind of a fumbly thing. I also wasn’t able to vote for myself because I forgot to register once I moved. And my roommate wrote me in as state Lieutenant Governor instead of committee person so it was a whole big mess. But here I am. I am the committee person, and I, um [Applause] and basically my job is to get out the
vote. It’s to encourage people to get involved in their community. It’s a pretty low-level situation. I just tell you to vote. Tell you to register, and make sure you get to the polls. So why am I doing this? I am a writer on a good day. I sell pickles at the local Rittenhouse farmers market on Saturdays. I’m not your typical front of the lines political junkie. In fact, I went to a dinner with
the rest of the committee people in my division and as I sat there listening to all of their exciting endeavors in the political world I said I should probably take a look back at that third grade social studies class and maybe rewatch the school of… the, the school of rock… What, what’s the? I don’t even, house of school… Schoolhouse Rock. The bill one. How does that go? Let’s do it together. [Singing] I’m just a bill. Only a bill. So clearly I need to do some some, uh… some work on my political world. But um… Yeah, so I guess what really pushed me to do this uh, especially in this, in this time was a true sense of rage. I am pretty mad and I feel pretty rage-y a
lot of the time. Less than 20% of registered voters in Philadelphia voted in our primary elections. Schools in Philadelphia are outdated and children are not getting access to the things that they deserve. Um…So, and among other
things. So I thought, in my little way let me try and do something that will help people get to where they need to be. Um… In all of that Uh, there are some people doing
really wonderful things. Um, half of the people that won the committee the committee people’s seats, were women. More than half. This last primary election [Applause] Which is great. Um… Kids all across Philadelphia are
working really hard to encourage each other to register to vote. Today was National Voter Registration Day. And, um, I think youth are really working hard to, um get themselves out there and march and make policy changes and get their voices heard. Um. So, I am just working to kind of push that along um, as best I can. Um, and yeah, so… What’s my final wrap up here? Um… [Laughs] I think in, in all of this, uh, I just tried something new, like I’m doing right now. and [Laughs] Uh, I think [Applause] Part of the idea of saving democracy is… is putting yourself outside of your comfort zone and doing something that scares you and this scares me, and going out to people’s doors and knocking on their doors and saying Hi, I’m running for this position that you probably never heard of. Also my name is Jamie. And hello. And then getting a door maybe kind of closed slowly in front of you is, is okay and it’s part of the process. And I am forever, kind of… admiring all the youth that I encounter
day in and day out who are working so hard in their way, um to… to change our
future and I think that is, um… who we’re working for, and… you know, Carson, my neighbor, who’s seven years old is who I’m working for. Um. And I think at the end
of the day, um, I’m just a 20-something year old girl, who is standing in front of a bunch of elected officials asking them to do their job. And if they don’t, I’ve got a long list of women, and youth disruptors who will gladly do it for them. Thank you. [Wild Applause] [Percussive Music]

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