Light Chipping – Soviet Ball Tank “Sharotank” (Miniart 1/35 Scale Model Weathering Tutorial)

Light Chipping – Soviet Ball Tank “Sharotank” (Miniart 1/35 Scale Model Weathering Tutorial)


What’s up everyone! Today I’m finally
gonna perform my favourite technique – Chipping. I’m gonna get right to it.
I’ll need these paints and Drying Retarder – a magic potion that makes life
much easier. Let’s mix them up. Deck Tan is great for mixing light green colors if you don’t want them too saturated. Some water will also be needed to clean the brush every
5 minutes or so. We need this paint to be fairly light, as we are going to make the
first layer of light colored chips. Um… this might be too light? Yeah that’s more like it. Acrylic retarder will make the paint dry
slower. This is very important if you don’t want the paint to dry up on your
brush after a few seconds. Oh, and I almost forgot the Lacquer Thinner! I’ll need
this for heavy-duty brush cleaning every 10 to 15 minutes. As for the brush, I’ve
been using this Red Sable Kolinsky from Vallejo for about, um, 5 years? And it’s still
as good as new! I think it’s a double zero size, but I’m not sure, because the
lettering has already worn off. So let’s begin. Like I said before, this subject is
very weird and I didn’t know how to proceed, so I started with the most
obvious place where chips would be present – the side hatch. This light green chipping effect is just
the first layer. It represents small scuffs in the paint job and most of this
will be filled with darker steel chips in the next episode. You can see how the
chipping is already creating more contrast between the hatch and the hull.
That’s one thing I love about this technique – it makes your models look more detailed. You might also notice that I like to
overdo my chipping. That’s simply because I enjoy the extra detail, sharpness and
texture it gives to the model. If I ever made a used tank without any chips I
would consider it… unfinished? Hey, that actually sounds like a cool
challenge for some future model: NO CHIPPING CHALLENGE The fuel tank cover
is a great example how light chips can highlight fine details like bolts and
also define the edge of the part, making it more visible. I think the support wheels are pretty
exposed parts, so lots of fine chips would be present on their mud guards. The underside is absolute chipping
heaven… or hell… depends… I’m starting with huge chips, but
then I immediately surround and connect them with each other using smaller ones. I believe this area would be heavily chipped because it’s in direct line of
fire from rocks, stumps, concrete and other hard terrain features. The more I move further from the lowest
part, the smaller the chipping gets. It’s important to always combine large and
small chips. This way you can create an optical transition between heavily
damaged and unscathed paint. And here I’m adding fine scratches
created by the tank dragging itself over hard objects like rocks protruding from
the ground. This makes the entire effect even more refined. Now I can focus on
other parts. I’m again highlighting the bolts and the ring securing the ball
mount. The inside of the gun opening would be pretty banged up from the
machine gun barrel moving around. Some very fine dots will add more texture to the ball mount itself. At this moment I felt confident enough
to return to the hatch. I added less chipping towards the upper
portion, but still painted at least some to outline the entire part. I often use
it to hide small particles of dust caught in the base coat. It’s… unfortunate. It
happens to me all the time, but I don’t make a fuss about it. Just paint it over
with chips and move on. If you make a mistake or you’re not happy with
something, you can remove the paint with a toothpick once it’s dry. The air intake
cover was outlined as well. We can all agree at this point that this isn’t
realistic at all, but the amount of contrast and surface detail you can
create is in my opinion very well worth it. And if you look at it from afar, it
actually looks pretty good. But I know a few more tricks to make it look even
more interesting. This time I’m going to mix the same light green from oil paints. Okay, a little bit more. Now we’re talking. I’m diluting it with enamel thinner into a transparent mixture. Almost like a
filter. Because I’ll be flicking it off the brush, it’s important to first test
the effect on a piece of paper. This technique is called speckling. See how
faint this effect is? It gives the paint even more distressed appearance and also helps to tone down the contrast between the chips and the base coat. If there’stoo much or some specks are too big it’s easy to remove them with a clean brush
and thinner. It also reduced contrast between the
green and brown. I think we can consider this a textured filter. Let’s now do the same, but more refined.
For this I’ll use much thicker paint and the result should be lots of tiny chips. I know I already painted enough of those, but I wanted more. This is a great way to
add lots of fine chips in a short amount of time. This effect also helps to blend
the large painted chips even further, resulting in a more natural look. And as
before, any large spatters are easily removed with thinner. Okay, that about does it for today. You might think the model looks pretty weird after this step and I can agree to some
point. But seeing it like this makes me actually quite happy, because I already
know I have a solid foundation for the upcoming steps, mainly dark steel chips
and rust effects. Now we’re getting to the actual interesting stuff. Thank you
all for watching and I’ll see you mates in the next one.

24 Comments on "Light Chipping – Soviet Ball Tank “Sharotank” (Miniart 1/35 Scale Model Weathering Tutorial)"


  1. This series is epic! Excellent work, and thank you so much for the videos 🙂

    Oh, and the "No Chipping Challenge" is something I would like to try for sure.

    Reply

  2. Hi. Very nice video series. I have a question. You introduced the speckling technique by first diluting the light green paint mixture with enamel thinner. You said that it is almost like a filter. Did you mean "wash"? My understanding (I'm still learning) is that the filters are created by applying various colored paint dots and then brushing them out using a thinner. Can you explain your use of the "filter" comment? Thanks.

    Reply

  3. This is artistry pure and simple. Epic! And wonderfully made videos too. Close-up, in focus, clearly described. Superb.

    Reply

  4. Very impressive. One of the best channels focusing on scale models, though there are lots of other good channels.
    What are the equipments you use to film? Do you use magic hand tripod to secure your camera?

    Reply

  5. Martin you are a chipping wizard if I ever did see one. This is probably the most challenging part of the weathering phase for myself. I've always thought less was more, but hell, the more the merrier. Watching those chips multiply was extremely satisfying. I must invest in a good natural brush with a fine tip! Please sir carry on!

    Cheers!

    Reply

  6. Your brush control is incredible and your tutorials are so helpful love this channel!

    Reply

  7. watching these chipping is like watching master painter at work ….beautiful chipping …..

    Reply

  8. I am watching the light chipping and I sort of see it; but then the horizontal scratches are added and I'm like "ooooooooh I see it now!"

    Reply

  9. I've gotta laugh. I just finished watching another Youtuber (sorry Night Shift, I do look at other content) and they were a native English speaker. I find your content easier to understand lol

    Reply

  10. I love it… but to be honest i dont think that the horizontal slot on the machinegun ball mounts would be dinged up from barrel movement as i believe it is just a vision slot for the gunner as the ball itself gyrates

    Reply

  11. Nearly every time at the end of your videos I think,..'humm he's gone too far and lost the reality of the model' (if possible with a ball tank). The chipping looks too bright and almost new. Dying to see your darker effects in next video. Fantastic video series buddy

    Reply

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