Naval Legends: Sovetsky Soyuz | World of Warships

Naval Legends: Sovetsky Soyuz | World of Warships


At the beginning
of the 20th century, the Russian Navy experienced a series
of shocks that brought it to its knees. The first significant hit came
with the Russo-Japanese War, when the Russian Empire
lost almost all of its big ships; then World War I,
the Russian Revolution of 1917, and the bloody Civil War that followed,
destroyed both the Empire and its Navy. Nevertheless, the Bolsheviks
looked to the future with optimism when they started building
the new socialist state. They saw a future in which the mightiest
ships in the world—Soviet ships— would sail on the high seas, protecting the peace and
prosperity of the Soviet Union. Naval Legends
Battleship Sovetsky Soyuz In 1927, with the
threat of war in the past, and diplomatic relations
with Great Britain broken, it became obvious that the
Soviet Union couldn’t repel an attack, even if it came from
neighboring Poland and Romania. For this reason, in 1928, the state approved a program
for the first five-year plans. These resulted in the
development of their heavy industry, particularly the
metallurgy industry, which enabled the start
of military construction and the development
of the Armed Forces. So, the state approved the program
for building large capital ships within the framework developing the
Armed Forces and military construction. The program of large
shipbuilding, adopted in 1936, presupposed that
in the following 10 years it would introduce around 530 ships
of the primary types into service, with a total displacement
of more than 1.3 million tons. Battleships were planned to have
comprised half of that tonnage. The funniest part of this was that not
a single great country in the world, out of their potential enemies, considered the Soviet Union as
an enemy they might battle at sea. That’s why they were
completely indifferent to anything that the Soviet
Union planned to construct. Moreover, one shouldn’t forget that
the Soviet state was absolutely closed. Everyone was under suspicion;
everything was top secret. That’s why the countries of
the West didn’t even suspect that we were planning
or building anything. Soviet shipbuilders
based their knowledge of how a battleship of that
era was supposed to be on the characteristics
of the new heavy ships being built by leading
sea states in the mid-1930s. In February 1936,
the requirements specifications for designing a Baltic
Sea Battleship (Project 21) and a Pacific Ocean Battleship
(Project 23) were formulated. After revisions of the technical
requirements specification of Project 23, it was named
as a Type “A” Battleship. In the spring of 1937,
when officials of the Soviet Union learnt that the Japanese and Germans
had started building battleships with a minimum
displacement of 50,000 tons, the Ministry of the Shipbuilding Industry
suggested that the design bureaus should rework the project, without any
limitations, in a period of three months. In November 1937,
Project 23 received its third revision. After 18 months, its final requirements
specification were approved, and by that time, two ships
were already under construction. The ships should have been built
in series, four battleships at a time. The keel of flagship Sovetsky
Soyuz was laid down in Leningrad. The hulls of Sovetskaya Rossiya
and Sovetskaya Byelorossia were laid down in Molotovsk,
which is called now Severodvinsk, and another, the hull of
Sovetskaya Ukraina, in Nikolaev. Performance characteristics
of Project 23 Battleship, 1939. Length: almost 270 meters.
Width: almost 39 meters. Draught: 10.45 meters.
Full displacement: 65,150 tons. Armor.
Primary armor belt: 375-420 mm. Total horizontal armor: 230 mm. Main battery turrets: 230-495 mm. Armament. Main battery: nine
406-mm B-37 guns in three turrets. Secondary battery: twelve 152-mm
B-38 guns in six turret mounts. AA battery: four twin mounts
with 100-mm B-54 guns. Eight 37-mm
quadruple 46-K machineguns. Aircraft Armament:
four KOR-2 seaplanes. Main propulsion plant: six water-tube boilers and
three main geared turbine units. Full power: 231,000 hp.
Maximum speed: 28 knots. Travel distance:
7,200 miles at a speed of 14 knots. According to the
“Shipbuilding Program of 1938-1945” approved by the USSR
Committee of Defense, the following number of ships were
planned for introduction into service: six battleships for the Pacific
Ocean fleet, four for the Baltic fleet, three for the Black Sea fleet,
and two for the Northern fleet. What does it mean
to build 15 battleships? Can you imagine the
required industrial base? These battleships required special
factories to produce their ammunition, artillery mounts,
machinery, and so on… The entire economy of the
country was geared towards this. At the time the ships of Project 23
Sovetsky Soyuz were laid down, the Soviet Union was suffering from
a severe lack of shipbuilding facilities which could hold such heavy ships. For that reason, a factory in Molotovsk, known now
as Severodvinsk, was constructed. It had two roofed dockyards, which were used for constructing
ship hulls all year round. It allowed the
construction of ships in the severe north climatic
weather conditions all year round. The weather conditions
had no effect on production— quite a desirable novelty
in the world’s shipbuilding industry. The difficulties that
Soviet industry had to face during the construction of
these ships were unprecedented. Delays in supplying steel
for hulls to the shipyards, difficulties in producing armor
at the required quality and volume, and, most importantly,
a lack of skilled specialists. Pre-revolution experience in
designing and building large ships was partially lost or obsolete, and as a result, the young
Soviet school of shipbuilders had to catch up on
the trends of the time, fast. Imagine you’re an automobile
engineer, you’re called to Moscow, and then told: “Today, you’ll be building
not cars, but tanks T-80 or T-90.” How would you respond?
Perhaps you’d say: “But I’ve never built
anything like that!” And they might respond: “Does
that mean that you can’t build a tank? Are you an enemy of the
Soviet Union? A German spy?” Now, you’ve
been brainwashed. It’s neither bad, nor good.
It’s just a fact. Plus, you’re a member of the
Communist party, you’re a patriot, and you almost certainly don’t
want to be executed by firing squad. All of those things
in combination forced people to work,
study, and learn new things. This is this phenomenon of Soviet
engineers of the 1930s, 40s, and even 50s. They were working
12-16 hours a day. That was a particular Stalinist style, when a boss worked until eight
or nine o’clock in the evening, and all of their
subordinates did the same. What does it mean that you want
to go home? Your boss is working. Your boss is thinking about how
to build battleship Sovetsky Soyuz. Aren’t you thinking about that as well?
Yes, you are thinking about that too. The authorities of the
country and their Armed Forces were inspired by the successes
of their industrialization, aviation industry,
and tank-building industry. They were excited
about the shipbuilders, who never stopped refining
and upgrading their projects, even after they
had been laid down. Lacking the necessary experience,
searching for optimal solutions required more extensive
experiments and theoretical research, which couldn’t be
always accounted for in the approved terms
of the construction program. Everything was in a mess:
specialists, organization, etc. They had no idea
how put all of that together. The structure of the battleship
was constantly changing. When engineers began
laying down the keel, they were still working out what
kind of battleship they should build. Why did this happen? Once again,
we didn’t have the technology. We didn’t have an
assembly line for battleships. Technology had
moved too far forward, and the Soviet engineers needed
to build completely different ships compared to those which had
been built by the Russian Empire. Obviously that introduced
some significant corrections into the general understanding
of how ships should have looked. To advance their capabilities, they
tried to acquire experience from abroad. So, the Soviets contacted the United
States, France, Germany, and Italy. You should understand that it was
the 20th century, and no country could build anything in total isolation
and without help of other countries. First of all, they needed to research
the battleships of foreign countries, starting with their
potential enemies. Caliber, speed, armor— the funny part was that all of this
data was available in open sources. Taking into account the fact
that the firepower of any battleship is mostly in its primary guns,
the firepower of Sovetsky Soyuz should have corresponded to the
firepower of comparable foreign ships. At that time, the largest known
foreign naval artillery guns had a caliber of 406 mm.
The project for a 406 mm gun had been in development for the
needs of the Russian Imperial Navy before the
Russian Revolution of 1917. Almost 20 years later, Soviet
engineers returned to that task. But there was a huge abyss
between theoretical calculations and the practical implementation
of that gun in its metal form. To cross that abyss, a bridge, formed
of new plants and production standards, had to be built. As you might know,
they successfully crossed that abyss. In 1940, the MP-10
test mount was installed at the naval artillery test range
in Leningrad for testing gun B-37. By simply looking at that mount,
one could easily imagine how enormous a battleship turret with
three such guns would have been. The most outstanding part
of the gun was its barrel, which weighed more than
137 tons without its housing. Two blast furnaces
were used simultaneously for casting blanks
to produce the barrel. Then those gigantic cast
slabs were forged on a press and processed on a huge bench
but with a length of around 36 meters. In general, it took around
a year to produce a single barrel. In terms of being
a ballistic solution, the B-37 gun is one
of the best in the world. It’s inferior only to the
460-mm gun of Yamato gun, but the latter
has a larger caliber; and the US-made MK 7 gun,
with its heavy 1,225-kg shells, is better that the Soviet gun
in a number of characteristics. Basically, it’s the
third-best gun in the world. Neither the Englishmen, nor the French, nor the
Italians had a similar gun. Even the Germans
didn’t have anything like it. Performance
characteristics of gun B-37. Caliber: 406 mm.
Gun length: 20 meters. Barrel and breach block
mass: almost 137 tons. Maximum firing range:
45.6 kilometers. Initial shell velocity: 830 m/s.
Firing rate: two shots per minute. On June 22, 1941, the Soviet Union stood
as the world’s largest industrial power. They had a colossal number of planes,
tanks, and money for due to that, but as soon as
World War II started, all of their forces were
destroyed on the Western border. Leningrad was under siege,
Nikolaev was captured, and a pretty significant
amount of industrial power was lost with the
Mariupol armor plant. It also became apparent that the war wasn’t going
to be fought at sea, but on land, so all of their
forces and supplies were concentrated
on provisioning the land front. Thus, the battleship
construction program was halted. Despite the fact that no battleships
of the Sovetsky Soyuz class were built, their primary armament
still found a purpose in combat, even though it wasn’t at sea. During World War II, the MP-10 mount
was added to Artillery Battery 1, the most powerful artillery unit with the
longest range in the siege of Leningrad. Over the time of the city’s defense,
the B-37 gun fired a total of 185 shells at German positions,
destroying several artillery batteries, an ammunition warehouse, and
a reinforced concrete command post. During the offensive
operation to liberate Leningrad that ran from January 15 to 20,
1944, the gun fired 33 shells. One of the shells hit a power plant
building that was occupied by Germans, razing the building to the ground. After the war,
the Soviet authorities considered finalizing the
construction of Sovetsky Soyuz’s hull, but came to the realization
that the ship didn’t correspond to the post-war reality, primarily
because of its AA defenses, but also because
of its secondary armament. In addition to that,
quite a peculiar thing happened, it was revealed that foreign
spies had acquired data about the primary
characteristics of the battleship. Thus in 1949, the ship
was sent for scrapping. In general, if we analyze the
economic situation of that time, we can say that we couldn’t
have built 15 battleships by 1946. Even at the economic
development level of that time. But let’s imagine the opposite. Assume that nothing
tragic happened in 1941, and Sovetsky Soyuz
had actually been built… What would the battleship
represent if she had been launched? She would have been the most
state-of-the-art battleship of that time. These ships could have provided
security to the Soviet Union from all directions at sea. And furthermore, fight for supremacy
in the theater of war of the seas. One can review the capabilities
of battleship Sovetsky Soyuz as a tactical combat unit,
by comparing her with similar ships being designed
in other countries at the time. The only similar ship that
was actually built was Iowa. The British Lion and
German H-class battleships, like Sovetsky Soyuz,
were never built. With respect to her
size and displacement, Sovetsky Soyuz was
larger than the British Lion, and was comparable
with US and German battleships. However, she had much better
armor than other battleships. Regarding her primary armament, all of these ships were
equipped with nine 406-mm guns, except for H-39, which
should have had eight guns. The main advantage of the guns
installed on Sovetsky Soyuz was the higher
initial shell velocity, which provided a high
degree of armor penetration and firing accuracy
at short and medium distances. That’s extremely important for
the conditions of bad visibility that are quite common for
the Baltic and North seas. Moreover, the firing
range of the Soviet guns was greater compared
to the guns of Iowa and Lion. Taking into account
that Sovetsky Soyuz had been designed primarily
to act within boundary waters, she was inferior to other ships
in terms of her speed characteristics. When you start analyzing
the topic in such a manner, you begin to understand
why these battleships were needed, and that the country
was capable of building them, and also that the design
features of these ships fully corresponded to the
situation in the world at that time. If it weren’t for the war, the Soviets
would have built at least a single ship. Possibly even two. Two ships wouldn’t have
resolved any geopolitical situations, but they would at least have been
able to cool down some hotheads. Even though they
were never built, the Sovetsky Soyuz-class
battleships greatly influenced the entire scientific, technical, and
production base of the USSR industry. Brand-new metallurgical industrial
sectors appeared, as well as shipyards, and cities were founded in the fields
from the resulting infrastructure. The experience acquired by engineers
working on the battleship project became the basis of the development
of the post-war Soviet Navy. Those people who worked on Project 23
gained confidence in their abilities and bravely accepted the challenges
of the new technological era. They went on to
successfully create nuclear and guided missile ocean-going ships
in the couple-dozen years that followed.

100 Comments on "Naval Legends: Sovetsky Soyuz | World of Warships"


  1. Did you enjoy the new episode?

    Subscribe, so you wouldn't miss new episodes of Naval Legends!:)

    Reply

  2. Wargaming could you do the Death Star please

    There was a petition with over 100,000 signatures for the US government to build one

    It's very historical. Thanks.

    Reply

  3. 75% of these comments are shitting on the fact that this "Naval "Legend" " is based on a, basically, Paper Battleship.
    20% of these comments are shitting on the fact that the Russian Bias is FUCKING STRONG on this video
    and 5% of these comments are complimenting the CGI… while shitting on this video in some way

    Congrats WG, you've.. actually made the community do something together that ISN'T hating on the CV Rework… GG

    Reply

  4. WTF THIS STUFF IS TO OP
    I JUST GET ASS RAPE BY THESES THING AT THE WEIRDEST ANGEL ON THE BISMARCK WTF

    Reply

  5. ASSUME THAT NOTHING TRAGIC HAPPENED IN 1941 IS LIKE SAYING HITLER DIDNT WANT TO INVADE RUSSIA
    MITE AS WELL MAKE GERMANY COMMUNIST
    THIS GAME HISTORICAL IS OUT OF THE FUKING WINDOW

    Reply

  6. IF THESE SHIP WAS BUILD THE SOVIET ECONOMY IS FUK
    THEY MAY AS WELL COLLAPS BE FOR THE SPACE RACE HAPPEN
    THE TIME LINE IS COMPLETELY FUK

    Reply

  7. This is the quintessence of Russia: a greatest thing in the world…. which never came to existence!

    Reply

  8. Interestingly, Sovetsky Soyuz-class battleship uses the same turbine as the Bismarck-class battleship.

    Reply

  9. I know you are a russian company and all that , but calling a ship that was never built a naval legend is pushing the limits. its almost like Putin himself gave the order to produce this video as a propaganda piece…

    Reply

  10. You should probably do a Naval Legends episode on the Death Star from Star Wars, it was built like your Soyuz.

    Reply

  11. as cool as these documentaries on the ships that are in your game, there are other documentaries on these same ships already, so why do not stop making these videos that are somehow expensive and worry more about adding content and balancing ships, and breaking down this expense and make prices more attractive because paying the price of 1 AAA game on a single ship is totally insane. the game was very good but today it is unbalanced in PvP and practically pay to Win.

    Reply

  12. The age of Battleships was over after Pearl Harbor. Aircraft Carriers were to rule. They said it best, Russia was fighting a land war.

    Reply

  13. «Naval legend»

    Construction halted because the glorious god tier soviet union literally failed to make armor thicker than 230mm.

    What a joke

    Reply

  14. WOW! It is hard for me to believe the push back your getting for this content! This has been great and I loved the episode. Keep up all the great work!

    Reply

  15. The Ohio class with its targeting system and fully trained and tested crew,ship and design would of put this blue print wonders at the bottom of the ocean.

    Reply

  16. if only WG could put the same amount of time and work that they put in this with the CGI into there game then maybe there REEEEEwork wouldnt be so shit and UI would do something stupid like respond faster instead of waiting near on a min in port waiting for the game to go into queue for battles

    Reply

  17. 7:36 — Imagine you're an engineer who's never built… whatever they're asking you to build. Okay, you have no choice; but, not knowing how to build it, how do you go about it? Well, one thing is for sure, it better work and it better survive. And in a contest between even those two choices, survivability probably takes precedence over "working"… so building it very strong is probably a good way to go. And now it makes sense why the Soviets built shit that way. Well, partially that and one other, very interesting fact that occurred at the end of WWII… the Soviets made off with the biggest pressing machine in the world. https://youtu.be/hpgK51w6uhk

    Reply

  18. "could have been" "should have been" "what if…" come on WG, just own up to the fact that the Soviet navy up to the end of WW2 was a 3rd rate power.
    Why not make a video about a real ship from a real navy like the HMS Dreadnought?? You know that ship that started a naval arms race…..

    Reply

  19. I'm confused. The greatest battleship in the world? Outperformed anything the USA, Britain, or Germany ever sent into combat? Yet it never existed. There is a difference between capability, even in testing, and an actual combat record.

    Reply

  20. It cannot be a naval legend if it was never built. Gets a dislike for being disingenuous
    Slow your roll on the bias towards to Russian ships.

    Reply

  21. It's good to see that they spend that much effort on the 3D model of a nonexisting ship and then dont even use it ingame.

    Reply

  22. I do not consider incomplete soviet fantasy ship as "Naval Legend". Naval legends from my point of view are ships, which engaged in real and multiple battles over the years of history, ships where actual brave sailors lived (and sometimes died) as they tried to do the best for their countries.

    Reply

  23. I love how they skipped over the reasons why Russia's Navy was so bad and then glorified the communist work ethic.

    Reply

  24. you do this but not the uss laffey…. what a joke…… still better than history channel though, but the title of this series is now a bit missleading.

    Reply

  25. This is America, stop with that metric bullshit.The main guns are 406mm. Is that a 15 inch, 16 inch gun?

    Reply

  26. No offense, but the USSR the largest industrial power in the world in 1941? I highly doubt that … it is a bold claim … the USA was considerably larger in every economic branch… anyhow can you back this claim with any reliable statistics? (I doubt that either, since those datas back in those times werent usually public or shard globally) – lets say, the USSR was a leading industrial power among others, shall we?

    Reply

  27. Hay wargaming i stopped playing your shit game 2 years ago because you fucking people spend all your time making premium ships an then making them basically the same as free ships an when you can't find a real ship you just pull shit out your ass an always try an one up every nation in the world but your still the shit hole you where in 1930..fuck you wargaming

    Reply

  28. If you guys were going to do a video on a warship for which there is no remaining floating example, you didn't think to do one on CV-6 Enterprise or Warspite before a paper ship?

    Reply

  29. the coolest part of this video was the cgi of the battleship into real life. legit thought it was real for a second, then realised the sovetsky soyuz isnt.

    Reply

  30. Would have been the "state-of-art" battleship of that time…. TELL THAT TO THE YAMATO AND MUSHAHI!!!

    Reply

  31. Story about what would be. Can you do videos about battleships that have was put in service? I would like Roma 🙂

    Reply

  32. Cool video but… the only Legend to do with this video is the Legend of how under prepared the Soviet Navy was to build warships.

    Reply

  33. They talk as though the size of the guns make a battleship. What about rangefinding and command and control and the incidentals like fire fighting and crew training. I suspect these would have been well behind and changed her combat efficiency and battle effectiveness. A nice 'would be, could be, should've been though'.

    Reply

  34. Didn’t even bother to mention the British 18in gun so the B37 gun was not third but fourth best gun in the world XD what a joke

    Reply

  35. lol lol lol this ship had so many flaws. It copied the Italian torpedo armor scheme which was complete shit. The thing is the Russians had little to no experience building large ships and these ships wouldn’t haven’t been that great

    Reply

  36. Die größte Industriemacht der Welt ? Na ja. Wenn ich gleichzeitig dagegen sehe wie viel Große und Kleine Flugzeugträger,Schlachtschiffe,Schwere und Leichte Kreuzer ,Zerstörer,U-Boote,Fregatten , Liberty Schiffe usw. in den Jahren von den USA gebaut und in Fahrt gebracht wurden halte ich diese Aussage geradezu lächerlich . Ganz abgesehen von den tausenden Flugzeugen ,Panzer usw.die an Russland geliefert wurden .Dies wird aber gerne verschwiegen .

    Reply

  37. War started, in 06 22 1941….?????
    Bullshit ! Russian "historians"… shame on you !!
    Germans attacked Poland , 09 01 1939 and this is beginning of WW2 !!
    Then Soviet Union , attacked Poland 09 17 1939 !!
    Germans and Soviet Union signed Ribbentrop- Molotov pact 08 23 1939 ,so as alies they attacked Poland !!
    Then in April 1940 , Soviets murdered 22000 , Polish POW in Katyn !!
    This is history , not Russian "right history" !!

    Reply

  38. This is going to be one of the most powerful type of Battleship in the world, if at least one or two has been made during that time.

    Reply

  39. Imagine one cheep submarine would have destroid it as it did biggest Japanise warship. God loves you build peace not war.

    Reply

  40. Sovetsky soyuz resembles North calorina for me. The superstructure, the side guns. it resembles it greatly

    Reply

  41. Funny that there's no comparison of the Yamato which was designed in the mid thirties and launched in 1942 in the battleship comparison toward the end of the video. Yamato is conveniently left out even though Japan was a major enemy of the USSR in the late 1930s and 1940s in the Pacific/Asian Theater. "If it wasn't for the war, the Soviet Union would've built at least a single ship." lol Fan Fiction is fun isn't it?

    Reply

  42. Battleships launched between 1937 and 1949: US – 10, UK – 6, Germany – 4, France – 4 , Italy – 3, Japan – 2
    Soviet – a collection of rusting hulks for fantasy designs they lacked the engineering knowledge or industrial capacity to complete.
    WG…
    Queues Soviet national anthem
    Dis good da! Best ships in WoW 👍

    Reply

  43. with 238k hp power and only 3 shafts the engine wold have killed its self leaving port, not to mention the fact the Soviet union couldn't physically make enough high hardness steel to make its amour belt

    Reply

  44. The most of the ignorant western idiots believe this battleship never existed, and of course it existed, not completed but already it existed.

    Reply

  45. Seeing the dislikes is obvious that some jealous assholes of the west get mad. Lol why bismarck hasnt an episode and soviet union has one, lol simple, the Pr.23 was far better and bigger than the shitty humilliated bismarck. Lol even couldnt survive its first battle, germany is shit in the sea.

    Reply

  46. I like it, obviously Pr.23 is a naval legend of the biggest battleship of europe that would had been. It was already constructed

    Reply

  47. First of all, soviet union never asked for help to the noob germans for make a battleship specially bigger that germany even never made. the germans hardly made the bismarck class with help of italy too and has a nule experience to make big ships like japan and U.S the soviets asked to Italy and U.S for technical solutions.

    For other part I disagree that is stupid to say that russian empire had the engineers with the knowledege to make battleships like soviet union class, soviets has better and updated engenieers to make warships, the prove is the cold war.. Idiots. The tsarist engenieers werent updated with the newest standars we are talking about almost 30 years! . And also is false that soviet union didnt have the technology, the prove is that the Pr.23 was being constructed in 2 units and the Main guns already were deployed. And the battleship soviet union and soviet ukraime were already almost finished in the hull

    Reply

  48. I like the topic, but I put dislike 'cause I disagree in what they talk about the soviet Pr.23

    Reply

  49. You can tell Wargaming is from russia, always hype up their garbage designs, Russian navy was garbage until the 60's

    Reply

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