25 Comments on "Opium Wars | World History | Khan Academy"


  1. It's a bit sad that you did not mention Taiwan even once 😛

    Taiwan was Japan's first colony after all. Japan annexed Taiwan in 1895, and annex Korea in 1910.

    Well, technically Ryukyu was the first Japanese colony back in 1879, but Japan has maintained that Ryukyu was its tributary subject since 1609, after the Satsuma invasion.

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  2. It's sad this is still going on today. Google "Opium production in Afghanistan" and you will be blown away to find that America is exporting 90% of the worlds Opium from Afghanistan. And when the Taliban tried taking over they put a 100% stop to the production. Until we took control again. And they say it's getting worse and worse This is right in Wikipedia… Truly sad stuff.

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  3. As Gladstone gets mentioned in this I just thought I'd mention that it would be great to have a series on Liberalism, perhaps contrasting the different routes taken in the UK, US and mainland Europe?

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  4. know this, a race considers another race is okay to be enslaved, is okay to be enslaved, it's just a matter of time

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  5. Opium was NOT illegal in Britain. One could buy it over the counter in grocers' shops. It was only on 28 July 1916 when opium was made illegal in Britain *Qing dynasty made it illegal as early as 1799.
    A variety of medicines and patent cures containing opium or morphine were readily available, while laudanum (opium mixed with alcohol) was recommended as a cure for insomnia, menstrual cramps and many other ailments — and it was also popular because it was not taxed as heavily as wine or gin, so was a cheap way to get intoxicated. The poet S T Coleridge wrote Kubla Khan while high on laudanum.
    The first small-scale restriction only came in 1868, when a law was passed saying that products containing opium could only be sold in pharmacies.

    During the next 30 years or so opinion changed as the mechanics of drug addiction were discovered and researched. The medical profession began to campaign for opium to be restricted to prescription use only, although at first without success.
    In 1908 a law was passed that pharmacists must record the names of people to whom they sold drugs, including opium.

    In 1916 there was controversy over a story in the media that British soldiers fighting in the First World War were buying opium to use in the trenches. The government responded in May 1916 by passing a regulation under the Defence of the Realm Act making it illegal to sell opium and its derivatives (or cocaine or cannabis) to members of the British armed forces, unless under a doctor's prescription.
    On 28 July 1916 that restriction was extended to make it illegal to possess opium or cocaine at all, except for doctors and pharmacists and their patients. This, then, is when opium was made illegal.
    http://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryUK/HistoryofBritain/Opium-in-Victorian-Britain/

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  6. Brits have such a dark history and they continually sweep it under the rug. I wonder if Britain today know about the atrocities committed by their ancestors

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  7. England……RUTHLESS. The USA was still a baby nation and facing and overcoming its own civil war….The Brits!!!

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  8. Apply this knowledge to today's events. China and US trade deficit. America needs China's cheap labor and products much more than China's need for American products. What will happen?

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  9. England sold opium to China was a national crime, started wars because of China refuse buying opium, was crimes after crime. All the countries that helped England back then, must recognize this history and their mistake. England still haven't admit their crime, because they kept the treasures they robbed from Yuanmingyuan and refuse to return to China.England sold opium to China was a national crime, started wars because of China refuse buying opium, was crimes after crime. All the countries that helped England back then, must recognize this history and their mistake, includes France, America, Japan, Russia, Germany, Italy and Austria. England still haven't admit their crime, because they kept the treasures they robbed from Yuanmingyuan and refuse to return to China. It's hard to claim justice for China, because it involved so many countries. But what is right and wrong, we must know, it effects every country's new generation's moralities.

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  10. Finally a video that was well researched and did not add much bias to history.
    I appreciate the hard work you do Khan Academy in all your videos and realized that truth is hard to find when people usually speak from a point of bias and from an uneducated and misinformed place. – Truth Seeker

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