Spain’s Plan to Quit the Coal Industry Explained | NowThis World

Spain’s Plan to Quit the Coal Industry Explained | NowThis World


Climate change is happening. And one industry in particular, will have to undergo a huge transformation and all but disappear by 2050…. The coal industry. But what does this mean for that industry and governments around the world? And what about the workers the coal industry employs? We’re taking a look at the steps one country is taking to prepare for a clean energy economy, while trying to make sure no one gets left behind. To avoid the most devastating consequences of climate change, a United Nations panel of scientists recently warned that drastic action is required around the world. [Sanchez]The climate change we are
facing is global and cross-cutting. It directly affects a great many
sectors such as housing, tourism, water mobility, to name just a few. But this ecological transition which is starting to be known in many forms as the Green New Deal should not instill fear.
[Host] In Spain, Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez came into power in 2018. And one of his government’s priorities was taking immediate action to address climate change. That meant drastic action to limit Spain’s coal industry. The country had to comply with a European Union directive that said that public funds could no longer be used to keep unprofitable coal mines open. This meant that those mines had to be shut down by the end of 2018. And that’s exactly what happened. By December 2018, roughly three out of four of Spain’s coal miners clocked out of work for the last time. Spain’s socialist government cut a deal with several affiliated miner’s unions, referred to as the ‘Just Transition’ deal. The deal aimed to protect blue collar workers from some of the economic pain that mine closures would inflict. The deal would send 250 million euros, or roughly 285 million U.S. dollars, to Spain’s mining regions over the next ten years. This money would be spent on upgrading infrastructure in mining communities, like recycling or waste management facilities. Funds would also be spent on things like forest recovery and reducing noise pollution,
as well as other environmental needs. Some observers have pointed to this deal as an example of a popular climate policy that could be used as a model to be exported to other countries. They say the working-class
people employed by these industries would not be hit with the largest burden. That’s because this deal also ensured that roughly 60% of miners – those over age 48, or with over 25 years of service – would qualify for early retirement. And younger miners? Well they’ll receive severance pay and be first in line for jobs to environmentally revive former mining sites. But the deal isn’t perfect. While the Spanish government has started registering miners for new jobs, those positions might not be available until 2020. And that’s probably why some miners are really skeptical about this plan, as they wait to receive the benefits of the Just Transition deal. One miner told HuffPost last year that quote “The government only speaks about global warming, but they want to close the mine for [economic] reasons.” This type of sentiment could become a real challenge for Sanchez’s government moving forward — if the citizens most affected by this transition policy, don’t believe that it is necessary in the first place. While support for a ‘Just Transition’ deal among Spain’s miners is still up in the air, Sanchez’s government is plotting its next moves on climate policy. Parliament is currently considering the Climate Change and Energy Transition Law, which would set ambitious targets for moving Spain’s economy away from all fossil fuels. Spain would stop issuing new licenses for oil and gas exploration in Spanish waters and all drilling would end by 2040. Also, every car sold in Spain would have to be a ‘zero emission’ vehicle by that year. And workers whose jobs would be affected by the transition would receive financial support and job training, according to the new plan. To be clear, this is an ambitious plan. So we’ll be watching to see how Spain gets it done.

100 Comments on "Spain’s Plan to Quit the Coal Industry Explained | NowThis World"


  1. Just a friendly reminder to everyone here. Global warming is still just a theory. Until that theory is proven. No change is needed.

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  2. Meanwhile in Andalusia cancer rates are through the roof, probably one of the highest cancer rates in Europe from their outdated unhealthy Franco-era refineries placed in possibly the worst areas environmentally…

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  3. Meanwhile, people in the US debate on Climate Change and the country steps further and further from the Leadership role it used to have in the World.

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  4. Meanwhile in the U.S. we've got the Petulant Man Child in Chief who loves the coal industry. Makes me shake my head on a regular basis.

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  5. SEE! This is how you get climate action done! Instead of taxing emissions like Canada and France which is just splitting both nations. It’s about being comprehensive and actually working on a proper resolve. And Spain is on the proper path! Hopefully people take notice.

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  6. I like the women's voice. So calm and doesn't talk to fast, I feel like its perfect for explaining a situation like this.

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  7. Meanwhile, the United States is suffering from anti-science regimes. Oh well, our individual states are doing OK.

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  8. Education about climate change is very important, especially for government leaders. Cough*Donald Trump*Cough

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  9. Did you know that renewable energy is less efficient and damages the environment more than classic energy? I support removing the mines but the green new deal would just damage us.

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  10. Let’s say this did work in Spain. If so it would work in small countries like England & France but there’s no way this could work somewhere like China or the United States.

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  11. Please use your mind! How do you expect to get rid of fossil fuels if there are no alternatives. Almost all trucks have diesel engines. At this very moment, there is no electric engine capable of carrying 20 tons for a reasonable distance.
    If we stop using fossil fuels, your Amazon prime order will be delivered by some guy riding a horse.

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  12. More Climate Alarmists propaganda and lies. Wait till their electric bills triple. Socialist country so what do you expect.

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  13. Did y’all hear this cutie say Pedro in a Latina accent at 1:07 that was kinda cute not gonna lie

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  14. YEA WELL IF GLOBAL WARMING IS REAL THEN WHY ARE THE OCEANS RISING INSTEAD OF EVAPORATING?? LIBTARDS

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  15. The biggest AGW issue is the aerosol effect. If we don't find a way to block out the Sun, cutting CO2 won't fix anything.

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  16. I applaud Spain, I'm pretty sure their wind turbine system is one of the biggest if not the biggest in the world.

    Now they are exiting the coal industry, having a nice size budget to to go green 🙂

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  17. The only reason this planet is to safe I'm sorry for this conclusion is as humanity doesn't exist any more it's only solution

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  18. Yes but no at the same time bc if say the United States would do this and say ok no more oil drilling then the whole stat of Louisiana would crumble our economy is still mostly on oil and gas so Louisiana would be suffer a lot

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  19. 2050 huh? I'll make you a bet.
    Socialists haven't taken over this hemisphere. Watch as workers leave Spain.
    Solar Cycles are what is going to have the greatest impact. Puny Humans

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  20. Id be curious to see how Spain is planning to compensate for energy with closing down the plants, are they just shifting to natural gas and oil or sustainable energy sources

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  21. I am happy to inform you that the climate change hysteria is based on shoddy science and has become grossly over-politicized. The planet is fine. You can now go about living your life normally.

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  22. Key word Socialist Government… Top down management of the people. The people don't have a choice in their own future. It is not about the individual it is about the collective group being run by Brussels. This will destroy the country. The whole climate change issue is not about the climate, it is about power over the people. When you control energy you have the people by the neck. Add in all digital currency, control over private property, Gov controlled of education and healthcare now you have slaves.

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  23. Anyone who thinks we can completely stop using coal does not understand basic material science and/or expects our standard of living to change dramatically. All this change will do is use globalisation to move the production of things requiring coal to other, less developed countries where environmental standards are lower, ultimately ending up with a net negative for the global environment. Spain will be able to pat themselves on the back though, good job!

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  24. If your county's leadership has a goal of destroying its economy, lower the standard of living and quality of life to the pre industrial age, the answer is yes! Implement the Green New Deal and Energy Transition Plans.

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  25. I'm from Asturias, the region were the last coal mines were close. Altough it may sound wonderful said like in the video, the use of coal won't be lower (the remaining mines don't have too much coal left and the production was insignificant), but instead we will import a cheaper one. I'm totally in favour of the transicion into clean energy, but instead of hurting on region in the top 6 of europe of negative population growth, the government should reduce first the imports and also the dependance of coal. Only after that the mines should have been closed. Puxa Asturies

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  26. I fully support deals like this but The Spanish govt is not exactly a role model is responsible for democratic backsliding. I'm not being critical of the deal but of the govt that introduced it

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  27. The world is moving towards renewals and the plan for your life is to be a coal miner, you got some thinking to do.

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  28. Coal used as cement industry,making steel,making fertilizer who want to not using this product.

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  29. Why wasn’t animal agriculture mentioned because you know it’s the biggest cause of all greenhouse gases ever produced

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  30. Would think with the 15.8% unemployment rate in Spain, and the bad state of their economy would stop from shutting down an entire industry.

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  31. The next generations have the right of having a livable and healthy enviornment which spain is working for,i think it's a good modal to follow by the other industrialized countries especially usa and china who are the most polluted countries in the world!

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  32. If my government propping up coal mines because they're not profitable then yes I believe they should follow this model I don't want my tax dollars to go towards keeping another business afloat

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  33. Yo now this, if you reading this, choose better topics to talk about, you be choosing some boring things

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  34. Spanish coal is expensive and we don't have oil or gas, so you better paint green the end of the hand outs, and one thing socialist are very good at, is make up.

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  35. Coal is a combustible black or brownish-black sedimentary rock, formed as rock strata called coal seams.

    Coal is mostly carbon with variable amounts of other elements; chiefly hydrogen, sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen.

    Coal is formed if dead plant matter decays into peat, and (over millions of years) the heat and pressure of deep burial converts the peat into coal.

    As a fossil fuel burned for heat, coal supplies about a quarter of the world's primary energy and two-fifths of its electricity.

    Some iron and steel making and other industrial processes burn coal.

    The extraction and use of coal causes many premature deaths and much illness.

    Coal damages the environment; including by climate change, as it is the largest anthropogenic source of carbon dioxide, 14 Gt in 2016, which is 40% of the total fossil fuel emissions.

    As part of the worldwide energy transition, many countries have stopped using (or use less) coal.

    The largest consumer and importer of coal is China.

    The coal mines of China account for almost half of the world's coal supply.

    Australia accounts for about a third of world coal exports, followed by Indonesia and Russia.

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  36. Question can you talk about Indian allies and Pakistani allies in the wake of the current crisis.

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  37. Hopefully the miners find new jobs and/or retire safely. It sucks that people will lose their jobs but it has to be done sooner or later

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  38. Climate acts like this should be encouraged by all countries of the world When it is known that we are on a risk of extinction.!

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  39. Just implement the technology from Carbon Engineering (look them up, the technology is a game changer) that removes carbon from the atmosphere. But the media isn't reporting on it because it doesn't fit their narrative of social justice.

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  40. Coal plants deliver a decent cheap heat and electricity, renewables can't compete with them. Countries that try to change to renewable energy tend to have blackouts and significant rise in electricity bills

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  41. Vote for Trump! I am! I am an electrical power engineer these people have no idea what they are talking about

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  42. When they say retire at 48 they don't mean never work again? I mean I know that Soldiers in the US can retire as early as 38 with 20 years of service but most have to go for a second career because the pension is so low. I want to say the average military pension is somewhere between $2200-$2500/month before taxes. For most military members with children still at home this is not enough to support a middle class lifestyle. I was in the military and it always made me sad to see retired first sergeants working security jobs because they couldn't afford their mortgages.

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