Steel Chipping – Soviet Ball Tank “Sharotank” (Miniart 1/35 Scale Model Weathering Tutorial)

Steel Chipping – Soviet Ball Tank “Sharotank” (Miniart 1/35 Scale Model Weathering Tutorial)


What’s up everyone. Today I will paint
some steel chips. Before I get to that though, I need to address these tactical markings, because they still look quite spotless and… it’s driving me crazy man! I’m gonna use the Soviet 6K mixture from Episode 2. This one is made from Lifecolor paints, remember? At first I wanted to paint the chips the usual way, but then I realized I know a more efficient technique. So instead I smeared the paint all over the numbers without a single care in the world. No, I’m not joking! After it dried I used a toothpick to chip the paint away. You didn’t see
that coming now did you? This is an interesting alternative technique which
I used a few times in the past. It allows you to make pretty good chips even if
you’re not confident or experienced. Then I added some more light green chips
near them. And just as I did in the last episode, some oil paint speckling finished
the job. Now the markings don’t look so out of place and that means I can start with the steel chips. This is the stuff I will use and listen closely now! Because I’m going to tell you my ultimate chipping mixture tried and tested over
the years. Five drops black. Two drops deck tan, three drops retarder, one drop tap water. The result will be a dark grey steel colour with excellent consistency
for brush painting. Let’s begin shall we? Just like before I started around the
main hatches. All I need to do is to fill the previously painted green chips. That’s why I find this step much easier and more relaxing, because the layout is
already there, you just need to follow it. Note how the light green chips create a
thin outline around them. This adds more visual depth to the
entire effect. Also note how the dark grey colour makes the gap between the
hatch and the hull look deeper. Filling the horizontal scratches can be
a bit tricky, but all you need is a small amount of paint in your brush and
confidence in your hand. Because this tank doesn’t have many
edges, I spend most of the time filling small flakes on the ball’s surface. I didn’t fill the small green chips on
the brown parts, except the larger ones. This way they’ll remain more visible. I find this step very relaxing. It’s one
of the no-brainer type of techniques because like I said, you’re just
following the map you laid out before with the light chips. I like to listen to scary stories on
YouTube during this step. Actually, I listen to those all the time when I’m modelling. Ah yes, the famous fuel tank cover. I kept this part for later because I was looking forward to it so much! I personally love painting large chipped
areas with brush, because I have much more control over their shape compared
to the hairspray technique. Painting chips by hand gives you tons of
practice and confidence, which will result in a steady hand. You will also learn how to subconsciously paint random shapes. The key is not their quantity but
quality. If you can keep your chips small and in scale you’ll get away with overdoing their amount. You should be able to see only a few
large chips when observing the model from normal viewing distance. The small ones should become visible only when you lean closer. I think that does it for
today. The model is now ready for some light rust tones, which will finish the chipping process. Thank you all for watching and I’ll see you mates in the next one.

19 Comments on "Steel Chipping – Soviet Ball Tank “Sharotank” (Miniart 1/35 Scale Model Weathering Tutorial)"


  1. Hey guys, so I quickly realised that splitting the chipping process into 2 videos might be too much, so next time I'll document this process (both light and steel chips) in one video. Hope you'll enjoy it anyway!

    Reply

  2. Awesome, outstanding, excellent, funny and educational! But now I have to wait a week for more 🙁 but I'm looking forward to that 🙂 Thank you Martin!

    Reply

  3. Well done! Thank you for sharing your methods with us!
    Also I would like to ask – how do you ventilate the room where you assemble and paint your models? (komentář v angličtině, ať z něj něco mají i ostatní kolegové)

    Reply

  4. Wow … excellent tutorial … stunning weathering … thanks for sharing mate 🙂 … you are a real Master!!! … greetings Make*

    Reply

  5. One tip concerning chipping would be really REALLY helpfull:
    How to prevent your back from aching? This step takes sooo much time, even though I for sure don't take as much time as you do, I'm really in the mood for an hour-long massage afterwards 😉

    Also:
    In the past I used a dark grey color for chipping as well. But then I looked at heavyly worn machines like excavators and now I'm using a mix of gun metal, matte black, glossy black and a dark, rusty red-brown. That mix looks pretty much like that "not actually rusty, but still oxidated blank metal".
    But after all that's just my taste and your technique and choice of colours speak for themselves.

    Reply

  6. I love your works so much, in my eyes you are the new star on youtube modelers sky.

    Reply

  7. so the big secret to the chipping technique is to simply be a fucking boss with the paint brush. got it.

    Reply

  8. I was never a fan of the current fad of over weathering like the Mij Jimenz school of thought? I like to keep my model somewhT pretty if you know what I mean. On sci fi models I do apply a lot of weathering but not on my armor models which I keep to a minumum? I love your models because you apply just the right amount of weathering and in a controlled fashion which results in a "pretty model". The one thing I will never model is tanks in heavy mud. Why cover up all that extra detailing you' ve applied just to cover it up in mud. Just my opinion ! Looking forward to more videos- they are very entertaining with your humor. Grazie !

    Reply

  9. Good point. The hairspray technique is up to the brushes to give you the effect unlike painting by hand.

    Reply

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