The Biggest Myths About Socialism—Socialism Free Stuff: Part 1

The Biggest Myths About Socialism—Socialism Free Stuff: Part 1


“Socialism, the monster hiding under America’s
bed.” The reason why people view socialism as the monster hiding under people’s bed is
because of what recorded history has already proved to us, in other words, it’s not like
we haven’t got the evidence of the failure of socialism. It’s not only failed in the
likes of the Soviet Union or, you know, Mao’s China and you could go on about the millions
of people that left to starve and the millions it had killed, but, even if you tried to paint
socialism within the context of the Scandinavian economies, those economies had failed and
you’d only have to look at the likes of Sweden as an example of that. “Our chupacrabra, our
candyman. Say it three times into a mirror and your kid goes to college for free.” The
problem with this word free is it’s grossly misunderstood by a lot of people. They do
not understand that in Great Britain, and I have lived through this era of the free
education, of the so-called free tuition fees that people boast off about in terms of university;
they boast off about, you know, the free healthcare, however, at the same time they contradict
themselves by complaining about the costs of goods and services, such as, the costs
of living. That includes, of course, the costs of their food and drink, the costs just to
drive about on the road, such as your road tax, etc. You see, this is what people don’t
really understand is that the government cannot give to you without taking from another first
and what that simply means is it doesn’t just take from you in terms of tax money, that’s
not the only way that the government pays for the things like your universal healthcare
or your universal education, such as your free education, your free healthcare, it doesn’t
just take it from tax money, it takes it from other areas of the economy. So, whilst it
can give to you, it cannot give to you without taking from another first, it has to take
from another area of the economy. Now, this is the special part because a lot of people
don’t seem to understand this because these people complain about the cutbacks; they complain
about people getting paid off; they complain about wages being driven down; they complain
about the higher inflation; they complain about many things, they could even complain
about the higher interest rates, but this is the issue because people want their cake
and they want to eat it too and you can’t have your cake and you can’t eat it too. You
can’t have both, in other words, it’s a bit like this thing with the higher tax rates;
people want their higher tax rates but for some strange reason they want their lower
costs of living at the same time, you can’t have two at the same time, you either have
one or the other and that’s just the way things are in economics and people don’t understand
this. So, whenever you hear this rhetoric about how the NHS is more affordable, it never
was more affordable, it’s a great deal more expensive, you just don’t see it because it’s
a hidden cost and where’s that hidden cost? Well, it doesn’t just come from the taxpayer,
I mean, it costs £120 odd billion alone from the taxpayer per year, that’s the taxpayer,
we’re not even talking about going into the other areas, for example; how you would pay
for the NHS in Great Britain is through greatly increasing your interest rates, it could mean
that and I’ve actually seen this recently, we saw a raise in student loan, in terms of
the interest rates for that type of stuff, I mean, it’s crazy because you see your road
tax going up; you see the gas and electricity prices go up; you see food prices; you see,
you know, all of these things in your every day living, the inflation, it drives up and
that’s how you pay for it. You essentially pay for it out of other areas of the economy.
So, another way you would pay for it is through reducing, you know, your college and university
placements. Another way you would pay for it is seeing a higher unemployment rate, in
other words, people being paid off in the name of paying for it. It could mean, you
know, cutbacks to things within the education system because I remember when I was going
through my college course in photography, there was basically cutbacks happening within
the college, such as, we wouldn’t have the luxury to go abroad on some trip, so they
cut the funding for these type of things, but that’s essentially it. People don’t realise
but that’s where the money comes from to pay for those things. It’s not a case of, oh well
we can just, you know, throw money like there’s no tomorrow and we can just have all our trips
and all the rest of it, but, at the same time we will have our so-called free healthcare
and education because money has to come from somewhere to pay for it all and that’s essentially
where it comes from, it comes from out of the other areas where people are complaining
about. So, when people complain about the cutbacks to maybe the staff; when people complain
about the higher costs of goods and services, this is because part of that, people are paying
out higher tax rates such as business owners, etc, in order to pay for things like that.
In turn, it reduces your productivity levels because businesses may have to cutback because
they cannot afford, so they don’t produce as much and when you do not produce as much
in the laws of supply and demand, the less that you produce, the higher the costs of
those goods and services would be. There’s many factors that go into it, but essentially,
all you have to understand is that nothing is free, it’s a hidden cost and unfortunately,
when you talk about the NHS, the so-called free education system; the free tuition of
universities in Scotland, all of that comes at a dear cost and yes, we can see from Scotland,
it having the largest deficit in Europe, as well, of course, the very fact that within
Scotland we’ve got a serious debt problem as it is that they like to pretend it’s not
Scotland’s, it’s the United Kingdom’s, as if to say Scotland is not complicit with the
United Kingdom, I don’t buy into that. And there’s this other thing. Just, overall, in
terms of Scotland, I can give you a small example; when it came to me finishing off
my study in photography and I had graduated, I did have the choice to go on and do the
degree at university, I didn’t because it wouldn’t be much point if I’m going to do
social type photography and stuff like that. Anyway, the point being is the issue that
the number of placements for each of those universities that were available for photography,
you’re talking about 11 places, that’s how many placements are available for each university
for that course, for photography, 11 placements. There was only 11 placements for the City
of Glasgow College, they do part with the, I think University West of Scotland, I think
there was 11 placements for the one in Edinburgh, in fact, 2 of them in Edinburgh; I think about
11 placements for the one in Aberdeen and things like that and you then have to take
into consideration the amount of people who, you know, are chasing that one course, the
one degree for that course and there’s a lot of people. Now, the problem is is you think
“oh well, that’s fine, we can get by with that.” Yes, it might seem good in hindsight,
but see behind closed doors, behind what you can’t really see in the background, there
are cutbacks that take place as a result in order to make space to afford that so-called
free tuition fee and this is what a lot of people don’t get and that’s why when you see
people complain about higher costs of living, but at the same time they want their free
goods, you can’t have both. That’s essentially why people struggle to get by because of that,
it’s a hidden cost and it never was free, you’re just paying for it out of another area
of your living basically. So, I hope that clears that.

11 Comments on "The Biggest Myths About Socialism—Socialism Free Stuff: Part 1"


  1. Scotty, you know how you turn on the news and they discuss the NHS being on the brink of collapse and that the Tories are privatising certain functions of it? What does that even mean? Because I was never charged for it neither was my dad (aside from taxes).

    Reply

  2. Sorry to hear about your photography. I have a question regarding university, why is England the most expensive place in the world to receive a university education.

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  3. The NHS is in a right mess at the moment, myself last year I stupidly tried to washout my own ears, with a washing up liquid bottle, any way I ended up pushing wax deeper and had tinnitus it was horrible I tried to get it sorted on NHS but the waiting list just to get an assessment from the ear department was 6 months! And that was just an assessment! Anyway I went private I was assesd and ear fixed in 30 minutes the following week and cost 100 quid. I can't see the NHS lasting, it's costs a rising rapidly year after year (and that's directly through taxes) I had never considered your point about indirect costs via other areas in the economy till now! Real tax in the UK is ridiculous these days, and we have no political party that believes in individualism! The Tories want us all as corporate slaves, look at the new dividend tax they brought in! Purely to punish self employed people! I fear for the future of the UK.

    Reply

  4. Have you ever heard of market socialists?
    Such as Proudhon, the first political anarchist or Hodgskin, the first person to use the word capitalism to describe an economic system.

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  5. Hey Scotty, here's a healthcare video. Dumb Americans they'll believe in anything that Michael Moore says. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zXBhoFaSklo

    Reply

  6. People only care when it affects them. They cloak their self-interest in altruism, and pretend like they care about "the poor" when they are really just voting themselves other people's money.

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  7. Im sorry you seem to be talking about state subsidation of the market in a silly manner as though the economy works as a Zero sum game.
    People spending less money in one area doesn't mean that they start spending more in other areas to keep the economy in zero sum balance. What it means is that there is more available to be spent on other services, this allows competitors to pull out new services to compensate for lost ones and further incentivizes them to grab the new money. That is how the efficiency argument works right.

    Reply

  8. Marxists don't live in the real world but then again they take economic lessons from someone who never worked a job in his life(Karl Marx).

    Reply

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