The Freikorps Fights On – Estonia and Latvia War For Independence I THE GREAT WAR 1919

The Freikorps Fights On – Estonia and Latvia War For Independence I THE GREAT WAR 1919


Now before i start todays episode I just wanted to tell you that The Great War Team is producing the ultimate documentary about the Battle of Berlin in WW2 You can find out more at indiegogo.com or check the first comment in the comment section below. And now on to the show. It’s September 1919, and the confused, back-and-forth
fighting in the Baltic region of the former Russian empire continues. German Freikorps units who had remained after
the November 1918 armistice are now formally dissolve – but instead of going home, they
prepare to march again. Hi, I’m Jesse Alexander and welcome to the
Great War. By the summer of 1919, the fighting in the
Baltics had ravaged the region and confirmed the independence of the new Republics of Estonia,
Latvia, and Lithuania. The first half of the year had seen clashes
amongst the Bolsheviks, the forces of the three republics, the Royal Navy in the Baltic
Sea, and local Baltic German militias and Freikorps. By early July, an armistice had been signed
at the insistence of the Allies, and the German Freikorps were ordered by the government in
Berlin to withdraw. But as usual in the post 1918 chaos, it wouldn’t
quite work out that way. The late summer and fall of 1919 would be
no less of a mess than the first half of the year, so let’s start with the strange story
of the Germans in the Baltics. Up until that summer, they had been loosely
organized as a militia of local Baltic Germans and Freikorps units, known as the Iron Division,
under the command of Rüdiger von der Goltz. After their defeat by the troops loyal to
the republican governments of Estonia and Latvia at Cesis in June, the Freikorps had
agreed to withdraw, but instead many stayed put around the town of Jelgava. But the Entente feared a German-Bolshevik
coalition in Eastern Europe, which, given that the Germans had brought Lenin to Russia
to instigate the revolution in 1917, didn’t seem far fetched to many at the time. The British and French therefore threatened
to resume blockading Germany if it didn’t force von der Goltz’s men to leave. But the German authorities were divided on
how to proceed. The army high command and Chancellor Ebert
did call on German forces in the Baltics to return to Germany, but many key politicians
quietly turned a blind eye to what was about to happen. See, many Freikorpsmen had been fighting for
land, which they understood had been promised to them by their former Allies in the Latvian
government. They began to re-organize in secret, and when
the Latvian government of Karlis Ulmanis declared they would not be granted citizenship in July,
thousands gathered to lay claim to land they felt they’d earned by fighting the Bolsheviks. Von der Goltz told the German government in
Berlin they intended to form a quote “military-settler-state”. On August 24, von der Goltz returned from
lobbying in Berlin to find that the first troops scheduled to return to Germany had
mutinied and refused to leave. The mutiny was led by Josef Bischoff and Heinz
Guderian, who would go on to become a famous general in World War 2. The Germans felt betrayed by both Latvia,
which refused them land and citizenship, and Germany, which they felt had abandoned them
and had fallen under socialist rule. Berlin was not pleased, but its demands that
the mutineers return home were ignored.. But the revitalized Freikorps could not declare
itself openly, due to Allied and Weimar German opposition. Instead, to hide the mostly German character
of the force, it was christened, oddly enough, the West Russian Volunteer Army – not to
be confused with the Northwestern White Russian Army operating near Petrograd. The West Russian Volunteer Army was formally
under the command of Great War and Russian Civil War veteran Cossack commander Pavel
Bermondt-AvAlov. According to one observer: “ [Bermondt]
liked to think of himself as a dashing adventurer, a great – if syphilitic – lover, and a brilliant
military leader.” But although the so-called Bermondtists did
include some rather uninterested Russian prisoners released by the Germans, it was a mostly German
formation and Bermondt himself was a mere figurehead. Some in the force did dream of restoring a
Russian empire in which they could settle as landowners, while others wanted to preserve
German power in the Baltics, and some were simply spoiling for a fight. On September 17, German forces officially
came under Bermondt’s command. When Ebert sent yet another demand for them
to return, von der Goltz simply told him there were no German forces left. Estimates as to the strength of the Bermondtians
vary from 14,000 to 22,000 fighting men, about 80% of them Germans. So by September, there was a phantom White
Russian force in Latvia consisting mostly of German Freikorps. They were eager to fight, and Bischoff announced
to the men they would march on Riga and reclaim the lands they felt they’d been promised. On October 4, the Bermondtists moved on Riga,
and demanded entry into the city to transit to Russia. The Latvian government refused, and Bermondt
attacked the city on October 8, despite the cold, rain, and wind. The two sides were more or less evenly matched,
with the Bermondtists fielding 8500 men and the Latvians between 6500 and 9000. Thanks to an agreement signed in July, the
Estonians provided the Latvians some assistance, including tanks and armoured trains, and their
troops guarded a stretch of the river outside the city. Aircraft and poison gas were used in the attack,
and the Bermondtists attempted to seize the bridges on the Daugava to cut off the Latvian
line of retreat. The Latvians rushed in reinforcements from
the east, where they were facing the Bolsheviks. After back-and-forth fighting, the Bermontdists
took one bank of the Daugava on the 10th, and began to advance downriver. Expecting Riga to fall, Ulmanis’ government
escaped to Cesis, and some Latvian soldiers also fled, and some looting took place – but
the city did not fall. In addition to the Latvian soldiers who remained,
the Estonian tanks had intervened at a crucial moment, and the attackers had limited ammunition
for their artillery. Some residents volunteered to fight or to
prepare defences, and morale soon recovered. An emergency battalion of students, civil
servants, and firemen damaged the bridges at night to prevent an enemy crossing. Ulmanis returned, alongside four Estonian
armored trains. But sporadic bombardment of the city continued,
and the fighting bogged down for some four weeks, during which time the guns of Royal
Navy ships supported the Latvian Republic and cut off German shipping and supply routes
in the Baltic. On October 15, following an ultimatum, the
Royal Navy fired on a German fort, allegedly in response to German fire directed at their
ships. Finding it quote “silly to blow the enemy
out of the fort and not occupy it,” the Latvians agreed to make an amphibious assault. Here’s how a British sailor described it:
“…a large collection of ferry boats, pleasure steamers, launches and tugs crowded with troops
came down the river and made for the fort under our barrage which we lifted at the proper
time. The crews of all these craft were women and
they handled them well. We then weighed [anchor] and steamed slowly
up river, shooting at the Germans who were bolting across country pursued by the Letts,
who[…]took 300 prisoners.” This action helped stop the main assault on
the southern bank of the river. At this point, Bermondt offered the Latvians
a ceasefire if they’d help him attack Bolshevik Russia – an offer the Latvians ignored. On November 4, the Bermondtists attacked the
town of Liepaja with 8000 men. The small Latvian garrison of 2000 defended
the town as best it could, but by the 14th the Bermondtists had taken the outer defences. The Royal Navy intervened again, and naval
gunfire in support of the Latvians turned the tide. One British sailor recalled: “…as soon
as the Germans started to run, the men of Libau went after them by cart, car, tram,
or anything on wheels, armed with anything from rifles to spades and pick-axes.”. Jesse, you know the Royal Navy wasn’t the
only actor in the Baltic Sea in 1919, right? Oh, hi Drach, nice of you to stop by. I do know a bit more about the naval military
history of the region but it’s already tough to put all the events on land into one video. Such a coincidence then, that I just released
a video detailing the naval warfare in the Baltic Sea in 1919! Yes, such a coincidence. Well, I will check your video out and I am
sure our fans will be interested as well. Bye! Thanks, bye! Generally speaking, between Latvians and Germans,
few prisoners were taken – but the Latvians often spared the Russian Bermondtists, since
most were more eager to hold political meetings than to fight. Freikorpsman Rudolf Höss, who would later
become Auschwitz’s first commandant recalled: “The fighting in the Baltic was more savage
and desperate than anything else in all the Freikorps fighting I saw before or afterwards. There was no real front to speak of: the enemy
was everywhere. And whenever there was a clash, it turned
into butchery to the extent of total annihilation.”. So although the fighting had bogged down in
front of Riga, the tide had begun to turn at Liepaja, and now the Latvian Republic would
go over to the attack once and for all. Back in Riga, on November 11 the Latvians
attacked along the Daugava, outflanking and surprising the enemy, who swiftly retreated. The Bermondtists were nearly surrounded at
Jelgava, but were saved at the last minute by the 1000 strong Rossbach Freikorps, which
arrived after a forced march from East Prussia through Lithuania – against orders from Berlin. After these defeats, von der Goltz asked for
his men to officially be allowed back into the German army, and the Germans requested
an armistice. But the Latvians and Lithuanians ignored the
armistice request, and the Latvians even declared war on Germany on November 26. As the defeated Bermondtists retreated towards
the Lithuanian border, the Freikorpsmen left a trail of destruction. They torched Jelgava before they left, and
spared no one they came across. According to historian Robert Waite: “The
soldiers of the Iron Division and the German Legion unloaded all their despair and fury
in one wild power blow’ against the Latvians, as villages burst into flames, prisoners were
trampled under foot [in] chaotic revenge and destructive joy. The leaders were powerless or else looked
on with grim approval”. During the retreat, many Freikorpsmen were
executed by their officers for plundering, which some have seen as a foreshadowing of
1945. At the end of November, the last Bermondtians
left Latvia and entered Lithuania. The Latvians wanted to pursue the enemy across
the border, but the Entente pressured them to stay put . The French attempted to negotiate
a ceasefire, but the Lithuanian army attacked at Radviliskis, and had chased the Germans
into East Prussia by mid December. So the Freikorps army of so called White Russians
had been beaten after months of bitter fighting – but while all this was going on, the Bolshevik
Red Army and Allied forces were still facing each other, and this front was not quiet either. In fact, there were Germans on this frnt too,
who had chosen a different path than the Freikorps-Bermondtians. After the Battle of Cesis and the ensuing
armistice, the Baltic German militia, known as the Landeswehr, was placed under the command
of 27 year old British Colonel Harold Alexander, who would later become a field marshal in
WWII. They were stationed facing the Bolsheviks,
and remained loyal to Alexander rather than marching to aid the Bermondtist attack on
Riga. It didn’t hurt of course that the Latvian
Republic had intercepted messages between the Bermondtists and the Landeswehr, so any
mutiny would have swiftly been crushed . But the Landeswehr was one small part of the
activity on the front, which saw active fighting, on sea and on land. In the Baltic, the Royal Navy launched several
daring raids against the Soviet Fleet based at Kronstadt, near Petrograd. On August 17, 8 small craft attacked the base
at night, with Finnish smugglers showing the British the way. Simultaneously, Sopwith Camels from the aircraft
carrier HMS Vindictive also attacked. The planes did little damage since they were
inexperienced at night bombing, but they distracted the defenders from the torpedo threat from
the boats. The British managed to sink the Bolsheviks
two biggest ships, a dreadnought and an older battleship, against the loss of three of the
coastal attack boats. Lieutenant Gordon Steele described his boat’s
attack : “Then there was another terrific explosion nearby. We received a great shock and a douche of
water. I realised that the cause of it was one of
our torpedoes exploding on the side of the battleship [Andrei Pervozvanny]. We were so close to her that a shower of picric
acid from the warhead of our torpedo was thrown over the stern of the boat, staining us a
yellow colour which we had some difficulty in removing afterwards.”. In addition to raiding Kronstadt, the British
also snuck into Petrograd several times to make contact with their secret agent, Paul
Dukes. A concert pianist by training, he helped hundreds
of Whites escape to Finland, infiltrated the Cheka, and was conscripted into the Red Army. Eventually, he escaped through the lines in
Latvia and made it back to Britain with his information preserved on toilet paper. Then he was knighted. Only in 1919. So the Royal Navy had crippled the Soviet
fleet for now – let’s head inland and see what’s happening there. Along the line between the Estonian Republic
and Bolshevik Russia, there was another unusual situation. Another White Russian army, this time actually
consisting of White Russians, was sandwiched more or less between the two sides since the
late spring. The Northwestern Army, under General Yudenich,
had the lukewarm support of the British and the downright reluctant support of the Estonian
Republic, which distrusted the Whites but hated the Bolsheviks even more. Estonian troops and artillery, and British
and Estonian ships supported the White Russian attack on Petrograd in October, which we will
cover in more detail in an upcoming episode. Once the attack failed the White Russians
retreated back into Estonia. The Estonian army promptly disarmed all soldiers
who refused to fight alongside them, fearing chaos caused by the disorganized soldiers
and their leaders, who were not on good terms with the Estonian authorities. Those who did not join Estonian units were
put in labour detachments. The White Russians and the refugees with them
were in a sorry state. One Estonian newspaper reported: “One can
see on the streets of Narva human shadows roaming around with vacant faces. These are the soldiers of this former army,
utterly defeated by hunger and disease. They are dressed in rags. Their greatcoats have been burned off from
the hem to the waist at the campfires while they were sleeping off their exhaustion, unaware
that their clothes were on fire. [One group] has not seen food for several
days. One of the soldiers has frostbitten feet and
barely creeps along with the help of another soldier exhausted by hunger.” The White Russians still able to fight were
incorporated into the Estonian First Division, alongside minority Ingrians and Baltic Germans. Although Lenin ordered Trotsky not to pursue
the Northwest Army into Estonia, fighting continued. The Bolsheviks launched their offensive on
November 16. The Estonian defences in the north were based
on prepared positions, but the Red Army advanced following the heaviest bombardment yet seen
in the Baltic fighting. By November 25, the Estonians had been forced
back to their second line of defence. The town of Narva was nearly surrounded, but
its 20,000 Estonian and White Russian defenders held out. The constant attacks had drained the Red Army,
and by November 31st the Red 7th Army was too exhausted even to mount a proper defensive
deployment. In the southern sector, Estonian defences
were weaker, and the Red Army broke through to the Narva river and managed to cross the
frozen surface several times – but each time the Estonians pushed them back. Fighting reached a fever pitch after peace
negotiations began on December 5th, as the Bolsheviks fought to improve their position. The last week of December the Red Army launched
a final attack, and when it also failed, an armistice was declared on December 31st, which
came into effect January 3rd. This series of battles is known to Estonians
as the Estonian Verdun, and some historians have compared the character of the fighting
– with artillery barrages pounding enemy trenches, barbed wire and bunkers – to the
Western Front. Alright, so much for the Estonians and the
Reds, but further south the Latvians were also facing off with the Bolshevik armies. The front between the Latvian Republic and
Bolshevik Russia was quiet for most of the second half of 1919, since both armies had
their hands full with other enemies. There was no defined front line, just fortified
outposts at regular intervals which saw frequent raids and skirmishes. Things changed dramatically on December 30,
as Latvia and Poland signed an alliance and attacked the province of Latgale, which was
under Red Army control. Historically the region had for a time been
part of a previous Polish state but now, Poland wanted to ensure the land went to Latvia,
rather than Lithuania, with whom the Poles were also fighting. Some 33,000 Latvian troops, 6,000 Landeswehr,
and 20,000 Poles took part in the offensive. Local guerilla fighters also harassed Red
supply lines and communications in the forested region. In a sign of the times, the Landeswehr, consisting
of Baltic Germans, under command of a British officer, went into battle alongside Poles
and Latvians, against Russian Bolsheviks. On January 5th, the Latvian-Polish force took
Latgale’s largest city, Daugavpils. The Red Army tried to make a stand at the
town of Rezekne, but they were forced to evacuate under cover of an armoured train. Eventually, an armistice was declared February
1. So as 1919 ended and 1920 began, a hint of
stability began to take shape in Estonia and Latvia. The fighting had largely ended, and peace
treaties would come later in the year, but not without difficulty. An August agreement by the Baltic States to
negotiate a joint peace with the Soviet Union had gone nowhere, and Estonians referred to
negotiating with the Soviets as quote “dancing with the Devil’s grandmother”. But the situation in the region was still
unstable. British sailors were war weary and near mutiny,
and the blockade of Bolshevik Russia had ended. Lithuania and Poland were still fighting,
as were the Poland and Russia. The Baltic States had consolidated their independence
in 1919, but with a neighbour as powerful and unstable as war-torn Russia, the future
was far from clear. Now that we’ve hopefully made some sense
of the fighting in the Baltics until the end of 1919, it’s time for our roundup segment,
where we take a look at what else is going on in September 1919. As usual, we’ll start in Eastern Europe. In Russia, General Denikin’s Armed Forces
of South Russia finally began the drive on Moscow aimed at defeating the Bolsheviks. Progress was good, and the Whites captured
Kursk and Voronezh before the month was out. In the east, Admiral Kolchak’s White army,
on the run since April, hit back with a counteroffensive that temporarily pushed back the Reds. On the 21st, Lithuanian authorities quashed
a second Polish coup attempt to establish a Polish-friendly government. On the 10th, near Paris, the Treaty of Saint
Germain en Laye was singed between the Republic of Austria and the Allies. It set the borders of much of Central Europe
and forbid Austrian union with Germany. On the 12th, Italian nationalist Gabriele
D’Annunzio and his followers entered Fiume, which he declared he had annexed to Italy. But the Italian government opposed the action
and blockaded the city. D’Annunzio’s Impresa di Fiume, or March
on Fiume, served as inspiration for Mussolini’s March on Rome a few years later. On the 14th, the British government outlaws
the revolutionary Irish Parliament. On the 28th a referendum took place in Luxembourg. The country voted to retain the monarchy and
Grand Duchess Charlotte, and for an economic union with France – though eventually it
got one with Belgium instead. From September 4th to 11th, the Turkish National
Movement of Mustafa Kemal met in Sivas. The delegates attempted to unite Turkish resistance
groups and the Ottoman government in Istanbul against the Allies. In the United States Throughout the month,
the Red Summer continued and race riots occurred in New York, Omaha, Nebraska, and Elaine,
Arkansas, where on September 30 at least 100 blacks were killed in one of the deadliest
outbreaks of racial violence in US history. And finally, on September 3rd President Wilson
began a tour of the country to gain support for the ratification of the Treaty of Versailles. On the 25th, he was forced to return to Washington
due to poor health. As usual, you can find all our sources for
this episode in the video description, including links to our amazon stores. Thanks to Kevin Axe, who did most of the research
for this episode. To get access to all our podcast episodes
with expert interviews, and other perks you can also support us on Patreon or by clicking
the join button below. I’m Jesse Alexander and this is The Great
War 1919, a production of Real Time History and the only YouTube history channel that
is not a fake White Russian Army actually made up of German Freikorps running wild in
the Baltic.

100 Comments on "The Freikorps Fights On – Estonia and Latvia War For Independence I THE GREAT WAR 1919"


  1. Help us make the ultimate documentary about the Battle of Berlin: https://realtimehistory.net/indiegogo

    Check out Warship Guides Channel: https://youtu.be/BhFlYw6lUsA

    Reply

  2. Damn, so much violence in our continent in just one century. Human life was so banalized.
    When people say we are a spoiled generation, we truly are (the bad parts and the good), because our ancestours fought so we could be "spoiled", but ironic that the people who usually say that are so spoiled compared to that generation. We truly have it good.
    And the "peace" was just the start of so many micro wars and big wars thanks to bad decisions and years old ethnic tensions.

    Reply

  3. Latvia is the only country in the XX century which had declared war on Germany and Soviet Russia at the same time, and won.

    Reply

  4. If possible, I enjoy these post-war episodes even more than the original WW1 content, mostly because I know even less about this time period than the Great War, and because I find the chaotic nature of the period extremely intriguing. Of course the videos are also extremely well-made, and the team has somehow managed to keep increasing the quality of the videos constantly. I especially like these Baltic episodes, since I'm from the relative vicinity of the region (Finland), yet had little idea about how eventful and complex the post-war era was in the baltic states, save for some basic knowledge about the estonian war of independence, mostly related to the finnish volunteers.

    Reply

  5. Finally.
    A Youtube history channel that isn't a fake White Russian Army actually made up of German Freikorps running wild in the Baltic.
    That's right, Invicta, Feature History, Townsends, and TimeGhost History. We're on to you.

    Reply

  6. For the battle of riga check out this movie
    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0471359/
    For a movie set in this period (beauful author movie)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coup_de_Grâce_(1976_film)

    Reply

  7. I didn´t know about the Freikorps sticking around after the defeat under Cesis and that Estonians had further clashes with those forces. Germans posing as Russians, what a clusterf*ck.
    If I had to explain what went on in the Baltics 1918-1920 I don´t think I would even try. Very interesting video, learned something today!

    Reply

  8. I am subscribed to both channels and, before I started this one already had Drach's ready on another tab. Now I see it's a collaboration and am all the happier for it.

    Reply

  9. "Check the first comment in the comment section down below" is badly phrased. Why?

    Could mean 2 things.
    The first comment you see or the comment on every YT video that says "first"

    Reply

  10. you said at 6:30 that the estonians intervened with tanks in the fight in riga. where did the tanks come from? were they captured or former red army tanks? its hard to believe that estonia produced their own tanks. following up on that: tanks werent that impactful during WW I in the trench war in the west. Did that change in fights in the city?

    Reply

  11. Daugava 🤔 I thought you said Dagobah 😁
     "A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away…." 
    Excellent series, thank you.

    Reply

  12. The more this channel delves into the history of inter-war years, the more I feel like there wasn't even two seperate world wars, but one massive one fought from the beginning of the 20th century all the way to 1945, followed by the Cold War, so the fighting never stopped permanently.

    Reply

  13. I think it would be interesting for a video on how all the various FrieKorps and militias were financed and how they obtained arms. Great episode as always.

    Reply

  14. WHY HAS THIS HISTORY NEVER BEEN TAUGHT TO US BEFORE BY OUR SCHOOLS OR HISTORY CHANNELS. sorry for shouting but I am really shocked

    Reply

  15. Its convenient that you left out that 16 Days in Berlin will be NEITHER airing on YouTube NOR will it be available to anyone who doesn't donate at least $20 for the 'value backer passes'. Completely DECEPTIVE MARKETING!

    Reply

  16. So zieh'n wir unter fremder Fahne

    Wir kriegen weder Sold noch Lohn

    |: Wir kämpfen unter Russenfahnen*

    Wir sind die deutsche Legion :|**

    Wir haben hinter uns gelassen,

    was andern dünket wert und gut

    |: Wir können lieben und auch hassen

    aus eig'nem Stolz und eignem Mut 😐

    Das Vaterland hat uns verstoßen***

    Undankbar tat es uns in Acht

    |: Wir sind getrennt von seinen Losen

    und zieh'n in unbekannte Schlacht 😐

    Drum, Brüder, schließet dicht die Reihen,

    und hat die Heimat uns verbannt

    |: Wir Baltikumer** sind die Freien

    Wenn Deutschland wankt, wir halten stand 😐

    Wir sind die Eisernen Soldaten***

    und steh'n für Deutschlands Kraft und Ehr'

    |: Wir tragen hoch drum uns're Taten,

    das alte Deutschland und sein Heer 😐

    Reply

  17. The Baltics 1919: everyone is fighting everyone. It's amazing such chaos continued to happen after end of WW1. Great content! 😁👍

    Reply

  18. The fact that Estonia refuses to sign a peace treaty is hilarious considering if the Soviets and Estonians fight to the death, Estonia is gonna run out of everything (including ppl) long b4 Russia. Still feel sad about Germany, I supported the kaiser from the very start.

    Reply

  19. Imagine trying to share war stories from this conflict to your grandkids.
    "Granpa, what did you do in the war?"
    "I was in the West Russian White Army."
    "Wow, so did you fight the Red Army?"
    "We would have, but the Royal Navy and some Latvians in pleasure boats got in the way."
    "But… granpa, weren't they also at war with the Reds? Shouldn't you have been allies?"
    "Well, we did try to conquer Latvia a little bit. You'll understand when you're older."
    Child grows older, does not understand and never will.

    Reply

  20. The Baltic wars of independence are sheer insanity. They make me patriotic for three countries I'm not even from.

    Reply

  21. aha, but you see my channel is a fake white Russian army made of of German friecore that is running wild in the Baltic's! see! your not the only one. gottem.

    Reply

  22. 100 years later….Foreign armies are rattling their mess kits once again on the Russian frontier….My old regiment…..is just over 100 miles from St. Petersburg….calling the Russians the aggressors.

    Reply

  23. It's incredible how, in your standard world and American history class in high school, the extensive post-war violence is ignored, quite simply because the Western Powers wrote the history books and, as they didn't experience significant post-war violence, they did not feel the need to discuss it in the history books.

    Reply

  24. 13:02 Excuse me, but there's a little mistake in the video. The British failed to sink any ships during the raid, but they merely damaged them

    22:43 Is Drachinifel a White Russian army? Oh no!

    Reply

  25. Jesse is so well spoken. Loving these post war videos. Can’t wait for 16 days in Berlin! Had to watch this one twice pretty confusing but very interesting.

    Reply

  26. hmmmm i dont know Jesse you sound like a fake White Russian Army actually made up of German Freikorps running wild in the Baltic to me

    Reply

  27. When you a Latvian have to fight a German paramilitary group, while fighting communist in areas that used to be in one country because an Austrian noble was shot by a terrorist.

    Reply

  28. The Finnish Marshall C.G.E. Mannerheim wanted to join Judenitš on the attack on Petrograd but did not receive support. Trotsky and Lenin were actually worried that this might happen since they would have more than likely lost Petrograd if the Finnish army supported the whites. It is a completely different matter if they could have kept Petrograd under control for any time.

    Reply

  29. You guys are amazing! Thanks for keeping history alive. I've watched for years and your passion for truth and history has never waned. Keep it up!

    Reply

  30. Status Quo of Borders is a Guarantee for Peace!
    Shift the borders and you have a war… DRAW A LINE IN 21st Century!

    Reply

  31. this video illustrates precisely why the Baltic states and Poland are so nervous TODAY over Russia's activities. It has been 100 years and Russian aggression has not changed, they still want to invade every surrounding country.

    Reply

  32. Seems like a lot of soldiers still wanted to fight after the great war ended. Maybe they should have kept it all going longer.

    Reply

  33. Ironic that Luxembourg had a referendum in 1919 and in 2019 are trying to stop the UK from enacting the result of a referendum….

    Reply

  34. So Russia and Germany was at war with Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania and Poland was also at war with Lithuania and Germany as at war with Russia

    Reply

  35. Interesting that the Freikorps movement in Latvia partially resembled the Battle of Courland 24 years later

    Reply

  36. Some historians call the time from 1914 to 1945 the second 30 year war instead of separating it into 2 world wars. The more i learn about this time, the more i think they are right.

    Reply

  37. Oh what a tangled web we weave in 1919. 🙄 You just can't make this stuff up, folks! BTW, I loved your ending statement! 😂😂

    Reply

  38. Where did the Germans in Baltics came from? They were part of Russia or Polish Lithuanian Commonwealth for few hundred years.

    Reply

  39. I believe chotravey matzerey means the devil's mother, then again that's the russian version of the saying, dunno bout other slavs

    Reply

  40. This is (to me) such an amazing and eye-opening history. In high school, we covered WWI to 1918 with brief mention of a revolution in Russia (reds vs. whites). The map of Europe was redrawn and I was given no clue of all the fighting that continued after Nov. 11 in eastern Europe nor anything suggesting the involvement of Britain, France, U.S., Germany and Japan in these conflicts. Thank you so very much for publishing this series.

    Reply

  41. why did you guys stop doing videos on the german channel i am german and i loved the channel why did you guys do this…

    Reply

  42. Why do you keep using the term “White Russians” to refer to the White Army or White Forces? “White Russia” implies Belarus: when I first watched this I wasn’t looking and assumed you were discussing Belarus around the 14:00 mark, but then I rewatched closer and realized you were talking about White Forces. (And yes I know Belarus translates to White Rus’ not White Russia, but the area was known as White Russia or Belorussia by the outside world until 1991.)

    Reply

  43. Who was feeding and paying the German soldiers in the Baltic?
    … particularly after they refused to return to Germany, per order of the German government.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *