The Last Jedi — Forcing Change

The Last Jedi — Forcing Change


Hi, I’m Michael. This is Lessons from the Screenplay. This is going to be a weird episode. Occasionally, I make a video as a way of forcing myself to figure out how I feel about a film or technique. This is exactly such a case. I’ve mentioned before that I am a huge Star
Wars fan. Going in to the theater to see The Last Jedi, I was eager to find out what the next chapter
held for the heroes I had come to love in The Force Awakens. I walked out of the theater partially elated— it had been a very long time since a big-budget,
tentpole film had genuinely surprised me. But I also felt unenthused. The Force Awakens left me excited for more
Star Wars… I had to force myself to see The Last Jedi
a second time. So today I want to dissect two of the character
arcs in the film… One of which drags the film down with its
design, and the other which builds to one of my favorite
moments in any Star Wars film… And finally, try to collect my thoughts about
the merits of letting the past die. Let’s take a look at The Last Jedi. Following the pattern established in The Force
Awakens, there are many parallels between The Last
Jedi and The Empire Strikes Back. The hero travels alone to a remote location to be trained in the ways of the force by a Jedi Master who is not exactly what they
were expecting. Because the protagonist is off in Jedi World, the other characters have to help keep the
plot moving, going on their own adventures, exploring unseen
parts of the galaxy and meeting new people. But while Han and Leia’s journey is exciting
and dramatic, Finn and Rose’s leaves something to be desired. Part of the reason is the lack of conflict
between them. Han and Leia have personalities that constantly
clash, yet they also are developing feelings for
each other. Finn and Rose have differences when they meet, but afterward pretty much get along great. But the deeper reason this storyline is flawed
has to do with Finn’s character arc. By the end of The Last Jedi, Finn is willing to sacrifice his life to try
to save the Resistance. “It’s too late, don’t do this!” “No! I won’t let them win.” But part of what makes the end of a character’s
arc of change compelling is how it contrasts with where they began, and it’s not very clear where Finn begins. “I really loved the notion that he’s left
the First Order but he hasn’t really joined the Resistance. Everything he does in The Force Awakens, even taking them to the Starkiller base— it’s not to help the Resistance, it’s
to help Rey. He always acts out of personal, and not ideological motivations.” “I’m just here to get Rey.” While true, the fact that Finn hasn’t already
joined the Resistance is not clearly re-established
in The LastJedi… at least not in the final cut. In a deleted scene, however, Finn does explain
that… “I believe in what you guys are doing here,
but I didn’t join this army. I don’t want you think I’m something I’m
not. I’m–” “Hey, it’s fine. You’re alright. You’re here with us,
where you belong.” Without this scene, the film is relying on
the audience to remember Finn’s hesitance to join the Resistance from the previous film. And if joining the Resistance is the decision
he is supposed to be struggling with, it’s odd that early in the story he decides
to risk his life for the Resistance. To return to one of my favorite quotes from
Robert McKee’s “Story”: “TRUE CHARACTER is revealed in the choices
a human being makes under pressure— the greater the pressure, the deeper the revelation, the truer the choice to the character’s
essential nature.” Finn does try to run at first, but in the next scene he’s pitching a dangerous
plan to save the Resistance to Poe. Besides this first escape attempt, Finn never makes another choice that demonstrates
his ambivalence toward staying with the Resistance. Instead, his doubt is expressed by listening
to people share their thoughts. He gets a monologue from Rose… “There’s only one business in the galaxy
that will get you this rich.” “War.” “Selling weapons to the first order.” …and a monologue from DJ… “‘Good guys,’ ‘bad guys.’ Made up words. It’s all a machine, partner. Live free, don’t join.” …and neither significantly affects the actions
he takes throughout the majority of the story. So when DJ betrays them… “They blow you up today, you’ll blow them
up tomorrow. It’s just business.” …and Finn declares that he’s made up his
mind on good guys and bad guys… “You’re wrong.” …it’s not that powerful. He just spent the whole movie helping the
Resistance and now he’s choosing to continue helping
the Resistance. The events of the plot have not compelled
him in a believable way to go from running away to save Rey to being
willing to die for the Resistance. All of this is unfortunate, because I like Finn and I think he could be
a really interesting character. And part of what is so confusing about The
Last Jedi is that this flawed arc happens alongside
another arc that has none of these problems and builds to one of the best moments in the
film. The character who transforms the most in The
Last Jedi… is Kylo Ren. Unlike with Finn’s arc, we get to see Kylo make decisions that externalize his inner struggle. The starting point of Kylo Ren’s arc is
established very clearly in his first scene. “I’ve given everything I have to you. To the dark side.” We witness Snoke emotionally manipulate him— feeding off Kylo’s desire to become a new
Darth Vader and the emotional turmoil of having killed his father. “You have too much of your father’s heart
in you, young Solo.” “I killed Han Solo.” “And look at you, the deed split your spirit
to the bone.” Kylo is wrestling with the conflict inside
him, lost somewhere between the light and the dark. And this is demonstrated because the plot
constantly puts him in situations where he must choose between these two paths. “Follow my lead.” For example, when he has a chance to kill
Leia, his mother and leader of the Resistance but can’t bring himself to do so. We also get to witness his emotional journey through the force connection between him and Rey. Mechanically, this is an excellent way to
force the protagonist and antagonist to interact in a way that can’t simply resort
to violence. At first, Kylo tries to show Rey that he is
the dark Sith he’s trying to be. “You are a monster.” “Yes I am.” But then he tries to make her understand him,
sharing the story of Luke’s betrayal. And finally—their emotional bond growing stronger —he is faced with yet another choice. “It isn’t too late.” Rey calls him to the light, and he chooses
to reach out and touch her. Time after time we see Kylo Ren given the
opportunity to embrace the darkness, but always hesitates. All of this builds to my favorite moment of
the film. After they touch hands, Rey glimpses the conflict
within him. “Just now, when we touched hands, I saw
his future. If I go to him, Ben solo will turn.” So she goes to Kylo, and he brings her before
Snoke. This begins an exciting cascade of character
failures that is the result of clever story construction. First, we learn that Rey wasn’t the only
one who saw the future, casting doubt on what will happen. “I saw something too. Because of what I saw, I know when the moment comes you’ll be the one to turn.” Then, Snoke reveals he was the one that connected
them, hoping Rey would bring herself to him. Rey has fallen into a trap. So Rey becomes desperate, but she is clearly
no match for Snoke. And here, at the depths of our characters’
failure and the apex of tension Kylo Ren must choose his path once and for
all. “Complete your training and fulfill your
destiny!” And with the flick of his fingers… …we gain a deeper understanding of his true
nature… …and two characters who began the story
as enemies become allies. Kylo’s arc demonstrates the emotional power
choices can have when the plot continually pushes characters
to confront their emotional struggle. And having witnessed his potential for good, it is that much more heartbreaking when he
finally chooses to become the villain of the story. The arcs of Kylo Ren and Finn express my conflicted
feelings about The Last Jedi. “Let’s go, chrome-dome.” Some of the things it does are amazing, others frustratingly disappointing. On one hand, I love how brave film is. As Mark Hamill said: “Last Jedi was incredibly daring… Because I would say, ‘We really have to think of what the audience
expects and what they want. And he says, ‘No, no. We have to do the opposite. We have to give them something they don’t
expect that we want.'” This is a great approach for creating a genuinely
new experience for an audience. It’s why the finale of The Last Jedi was
surprising, while the finale of The Force Awakens was
familiar. The heroes faced the antagonist with no meaningful
consequence as the good guys and bad guys had their usual
race to see who could blow up the other first— Death Star trench run and all. The finale of The Last Jedi took risks and
wasn’t afraid to dish out repercussions. An entire film’s worth of plot leads to
a dead end as Finn and Poe’s plan fails, almost bringing about the end of the Resistance. This was frustrating, but was also what made
the third act surprising. The Force Awakens ended as a tease, leaving
every question unanswered and building excitement more with the promise
of substance rather than substance itself. The Last Jedi directly answered all the questions
it thought were worth answering and dismissed the rest, all while giving each character a complete—if not always compelling—journey. Honestly, I’m left with as many questions
as when I started this video. “Let the past die. Kill it if you have to. That’s the only way to become what you were
meant to be.” Is this what we need to do? To let go of the franchise’s history, not let the new films be defined and restrained
by what has come before? Will we remember The Last Jedi as the movie
that freed Star Wars to become something unique among tentpole blockbusters… or as an attempt at ripping off the bandaid
that was both painful and failed to finish the job? And can Episode IX redeem the franchise in
the eyes that have forsaken it, while also living up to the standards set
by The Last Jedi’s willingness to let the past die? For now, it seems, we’ll just have to wait
and see… “How do we build a Rebellion from this?” “We have everything we need.” Have you ever wanted to learn a skill, but found that the only person that could
teach you was being kind of grumpy about it? Or have you ever thought, “it’d be cool to learn a new ability without
my mentor monologuing about how his past failures brought about
a new era of darkness in the universe?” Well luckily, Skillshare is a great place
for you to learn a new skill, where the lightsaber you just carried across
the galaxy won’t get tossed off a cliff. Skillshare is an online learning community
with over 20,000 classes in design, filmmaking, photography, and more. Premium Membership gives you unlimited access
to high quality classes on must-know topics, so you can improve your skills, unlock new
opportunities, and do the work you love. I recommend checking out Paul Trillo’s class
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simple, but awesome effects. The first five hundred people to use this
link will get their first 2 months of Skillshare for free. So head to skl.sh/lfts4 to get unlimited access
to over 20,000 classes today. Thanks to Skillshare for sponsoring this video. Hey guys, hope you enjoyed the video! Now that there are ten to choose from, which
is your favorite Star Wars film? Let me know in the comments below, or on twitter
@michaeltuckerla. Thank you as always to my Patrons and supporters here on YouTube for making the channel possible. Thank you for watching, and I will see you next time.

100 Comments on "The Last Jedi — Forcing Change"


  1. Hey guys! I recommend checking out Just Write's new video on The Last Jedi: https://youtu.be/CE7SkcoyVAI. It's a great breakdown of the three character arcs in the film, and how each character is being pulled between their want and their need.

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  2. Holy flying cow… What? The mental gymnastics in this video are… Wow… Just wow… Whenever I try to listen to the excuses about why the movie is so "great" I see how people omit huge parts, like on this video the so called finale and many other claims that mean nothing

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  3. Nobody had an arc aside from Po.His conflict was the only interesting thing in this whole thing,because he genuinely reacted with reason and prudence.Pink haired captain refuses to share plan and the situation is hopeless?On top of that she antagonizes/mocks those that raise questions?She must be a spy,we need to get her down!
    Still ended up being frustrating as fuck,since they made the pink haired captain be actually right!(remember kids never question authority)
    Kylo had no arc!He had a reboot after 2 hours of circle jerking us with the idea that he might be good!
    Rey is the Force incarnate,so it is hard making a character to her arc
    Finn could have a glorious end in this cesspool of a film,but alas,diversity quota/chinese marketing made sure to bring it down to base.
    Admiral Social Studies had the perfect ending,after ruining continuity in all 7 previous films
    Leia sadly grew senile for berating commanding officers on a job well done.She is also apparently a cyborg.And she can use the force.Apparently she just can now.Also it looked ridiculous.
    Snoke was a JJ box of mysteries,that Rian smashed down with a hammer and disintegrated with a flamethrower afterwards.
    Jake was pretty decent,aside from the fact that he wanted to murder Luke's nephew because of some irrational,unexplainable fear for the growing dark side of his.He dies after a skype call
    Rose out there is tasing volunteers from escaping the main ships and fighting capitalism and animal cruelty in a FUCKING STAR WARS movie.
    That hacker guy,who betrayed Finn and guys is either the best genius or an awesome plot contrivance,considering he calculated them getting detained for illegal parking and therefore get in contact with them in jail!There is some FORCE at play here.
    They dragged Yoda into this mess.And as a force ghost,he can summon lightning.Why don't all Jedi do that?It is a noteworthy guerilla warfare.Then again FTL ramming is now also a thing.
    I am sure there is a deeper meaning in all of this,but diamonds can be found in the sewers.Not many are looking for them there though!

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  4. Hey, just so you know, your captions aren't complete on this one. This means that HOH people will have a hard time here and Deaf people can't access this at all. Full captions are a necessity 100% of the time.

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  5. What about the absence of an arc for Rey. Literally learned nothing about her and she didn't learn anything new herself.

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  6. I really didn't like Rey in Force Awakens though Last Jedi did make me like her character more, that being said though, I've consistently liked Fin, he's always been a more interesting and more entertaining character to me, I just hope they make better use of him in the next movie.

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  7. Yup, we the audience definitely had a genuinely new experience walking out of a Star Wars film – we all gasped at how ill-conceived & disjointed this piece of garbage was. Now that Ruin Johnson has laid a massive dump 💩 on us, we really don’t care what happens in Ep9. He’s just an arrogant, creatively flaccid USC film school hack.

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  8. Finn's motivations come from wanting to get away from the first order. His actions stem from personal reasons (boarding the ship to get away at Maz's castle, going after Rey on starkiller base). His arc to me goes from someone who flees the first order to someone who's willing to die, not for the resistance, but to spite the first order because of what they have done to him

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  9. Love your video essays and I do believe you understand the language of film. However, I don't think you've had enough viewing time or analysis of The Last Jedi. As a basic three-act structure the movie fails, as a coherent plot it also fails, as continuity of what came before, again, it fails. As for character development, you're right, Kylo is the only one with a proper arc, but Rey, Finn, and Poe are completely butchered.

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  10. Too bad the fight choreography in the throne room fight was awful when you really look at it more than once.

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  11. Why do people think the movie is in favour of letting the past die? The character saying it is clearly portrayed as the bad guy.

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  12. Great thinking don't give the fans what they expect and want which is a great movie. Give them the opposite. Why doesn't everyone use that strategy? Hi we know you ordered a big mac meal but u know what? Fuck you here's a salad with a vanilla shake. Boom! Unexpected!!!

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  13. I like your insights and agree with your assessment of the potential of characters in TLJ, especially Finn, and agree that TLJ does a better job developing Kylo than any other character. I also think, however, that even the glimpses of greatness are poorly executed. The slow twisting of the light saber by Kylo is a great example of (in my opinion) lazy writing. Snoke, the grand puppeteer who has manipulated forces from across the galaxy is undone by such an obvious and slow-developing move without explanation comes of as implausible and forced and took me right out of that moment.

    I can see you have thought about the reasons you like TLJ, and I certainly respect that. I also respectfully disagree. When taken as a whole, these flashes of brilliance are lost in the cast of flat, under-developed characters, a schizophrenic theme, contrived plot devices, and broken promises made in the first movie (Knights of Ren, Rey being "no one," and the character assassination of Luke Skywalker to name a few). As for Johnson's quote: that's great when your making some indie auteur flick, but not a tent pole film in a $4B property with extensive lore and established themes. No hate, just sincere disagreement.

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  14. Kylo is fine, but the problem is that the rest of the movie feels like filler. Rey hasn’t progressed at all, but is somehow a Jedi Knight in two days. Luke’s character is regressed for shock value. Poe is made out to be a fool. The plot is essentially the resistance running out of gas while kylo and rey have skype sessions.

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  15. Really glad there exists a critique of a film that isnt just a platform for reactionary propaganda

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  16. No! Never let the past die! Let us make and see good movies. Let us not watch, what Disney's want to make us watch.
    If there is nothing good to watch, than let's rather watch nothing.

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  17. Both movies are severely flawed. I usually don’t have a lot of motivation to watch them.

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  18. I'm gonna put my thoughts down of before and after I watch this video. No one will read it, but this is the internet and I'm in a youtube comment which I believe let's me say whatever I want…..right?

    before watching video
    There are several different parts of me that have declared war inside me over The Last Jedi:

      – The Star Wars Fan Me: not happy. I am fully and completely invested in the old characters. I mean, they have been around since before I was born. The new characters are cool, but relative to Luke, Leia, Chewie, etc, I could care less about Rey, Poe, Finn, Rose, etc. And I find myself caring about the new characters because of how they connect to the old characters (ie, Kylo has Skywalker blood in him, connecting his story to the stories of Luke, Anakin, Padmé, Leia, and Han — among others –). So it's hard for me to connect with someone like Rey because she's totally disconnected from any of the old guard. So the Star Wars fan in me did not like The Last Jedi's forcing change-ness-ness because this part of me is here for Luke and Ackbar and Leia. And when I'm told that they don't really matter any more that hurts. THAT SAID, there are parts of The Last Jedi that are some of my favorite parts in THE ENTIRE FRANCHISE. The bummer of that is, is that there are also parts of The Last Jedi which are my least favorite parts in all of Star Wars. 

      – The Logical Movie Watching Story Telling Me: satisfied. The Last Jedi by itself is a good movie in my opinion. It feels a little segmented and clunky in the middle, but the ending more than makes up for the wait in the middle. I'm am sufficiently invested in the fate of the Resistance and the visuals are spot on. I like the humor and I am disappointed Porg Hot Dogs aren't a thing. R2 is gold whenever he's on screen. The plot is interesting, the characters are interesting. The points of view that the characters express are interesting. The Force-FaceTime was a novel way to create tension in the story. I think that The Last Jedi stands up as a film.

      – The Geeky Side of Me: THE LAST JEDI BUTCHERED SPACE. THE MILITARY TACTICS THROUGHOUT MOST OF THE FILM ARE RIDICULOUS. I have a really hard time not completely melting inside when I see how comically bad the First Order is at absolutely everything. Although I have to give the Resistance credit for suitably exploiting the First Order's idiocy. One example: The First Order fleet throughout the whole second act (ie, Snoke's giant flying wing of a dreadnought plus a dozen Resurgent Battlecruisers). Official canon stats for the Resurgent puts its armament at like 1500 turbo lasers or something ludicrously powerful like that. There are a dozen of these ships accompanying Snoke's Supremacy dreadnought wing ship. The First Order's whole deal is the Supremacy can't catch up to the Raddus, so they have to chase the Raddus until it runs out of gas. Ok, I get why the Supremacy can't exceed the Raddus's rate of acceleration. But canon has established that Resurgent Battlecruisers are fast. Certainly fast enough to pull into range of the Raddus and completely obliterate it. That's over fifteen thousand turbolasers all told between a dozen Resurgent Battlecruisers. I'm going to go out on a limb and say that that's probably enough to kill the Raddus dead. Also, how come the Raddus has no guns? It's a three kilometer long military warship? Why doesn't it shoot like ever?? Anyways, sorry for the rant. My favorite part of life and movies is the technical details and the military strategy. Not one of Star Wars' strong points. 

    So, those are the three points pf view battling for dominance inside me. Generally the Geek and the Star Wars fan outweigh the Logical part. 

    after watching video
    yup yup and yup

    The video kind of encapsulated my feelings. Frustration that the film spent so much time on plot elements that didn’t feel necessary and on emotional arcs that don’t feel earned. If something doesn’t feel earned, then it doesn’t feel valuable. But I also feel elation, because the parts of the film that were good, WERE GOOD. The Last Jedi has sequences that raise my hair with excitement, anticipation, and dread. But I also fall asleep during some parts and rage at the screen during others. I feel like The Last Jedi made a manifesto when it needed a statement. It declared that the past was dying and to get over it. I much prefer when a story convinces me emotionally and logically that something must go away BEFORE pulling off the bandaid, not after. When I think about it, I would agree that the theme of The Last Jedi, killing the past, finding something new, forcing change, etc, needs to happen. But I don’t want to have the head chopped off my favorite franchise and a new one sewn on until after you’ve done the work to bring me along and convince me that the story and characters deserve and have earned whatever you’re about to do to them. When you rely on the audience to do that for themselves, I don’t like it. I appreciate when films have weight and consequences, but I’d like to know what the “why” is for those consequences before they’re administered. The Last Jedi feels very broad in its focus, but narrow in its consequences. I feel that if it focused in on the critical characters and their arcs, then the film would have been much better.

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  19. Finn’s character arc isn’t the only problem with his part of the story. The actual plot points that it follows also undermine the rest of the film.

    The Resistance is running from the First Order, but they’re not fast enough to escape, and they will only survive as long as their ships have power. It sets up this tension, and that tension is reinforced several times throughout the film. There’s no escape, they will die when the power is gone.

    Yet Finn and Rose manage to steal a craft that has enough power to take them across the galaxy and back again. Turns out there is an escape. There was an escape the whole time. Power is meaningless. The resistance is perfectly capable of sending escape ships out, or supply ships to bring them more fuel. Why are they worried about power? They have complete access to enough of it.

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  20. Lesson of the movie they should have flown something at lightspeed into the death star problem solved!!! 🤦‍♂️

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  21. I would have liked it if Rose and that story arc was gone, and Luke lived and wasn’t a grumpy old man.

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  22. Ryan Johson also made the Last Jedi one of the most cinematographic star wars movies. Every scene looked like it could be a poster. JJ Abrams made a really cool Star Wars film. Though The Last Jedi was painfully boring to rewatch 🙁

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  23. Most frustrating of all was the deleted scenes. The best scenes in the movie, besides the finale, were deleted. God.

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  24. So much change that thirty years later they are still rebels fighting an overpowered dictature.
    The Endor victory rendered meaningless

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  25. This film, as most people know, was a steaming pile of refuse. You have a good channel, but it boggles my mind you'd waste your time making a video about this one.

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  26. Very good observations. I adore the film, but I agree it's got a few issues. Finn does switch motivation pretty quick after getting shocked by Rose.

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  27. I only know than the last jedi left me with no desire to see anything new of Star Wars. Maybe they are right and we must left the past die and don't see any new remake of old movies.

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  28. It was visually impressive. And had a couple enjoyable moments… but in the end it was like watching a dog chase his tail for three hours: fun but ultimately pointless.

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  29. The problem is Finn is smart and knowledgeable. He was just a stormtrooper. Why the hell does he know IMPORTANT things as they really are?! If he was wrong about SOME THING it would've given his girl a role as the voice of reason at the very least. Would've given depth to him finally doing something WRONG when he attempts to sacrifice himself too.

    Anyways 😄😄😄

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  30. the last jedi, despite its flaws, is exactly what i need as a star wars fan. something so out of this world, which of course will cause controversies. force awakens was safer, everyone loved it, but as a star wars fan and a movie fan in general, similarities are not what i am looking for in movies, but the movie that makes us think.

    i wish rise of the skywalker won't be reshoot, rewrite, remain untouched just because of people's reaction. i don't want my beloved franchise to be the next DCEU with their justice league mistake

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  31. "Surprised by not enthused"; So true. You know what doesn't last? Surprise. That's not how you make a movie that will still be enjoyed a decade later.

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  32. Part 1: sorry for poor english. I would be really interesting to know if you have the same feeling or interpretation after few months. 

    because, no, TFA, TLJ are not better than Rogue One, and they are not good Star wars either for many reasons. 

    Somethings miss in this movie most of all: 

    1/A scenario, a scenario prepared to make trilogie

    Sorry but they didn t hide they wrote movie after movie, Big mistake. 

    2/ Respect of the diegetic of Star Wars, as rogue One succeed to do. (And prelogie also) they try to remplace the old by something different (Lightsaber calls her just for 1 exemple? Wtf, are we in HPotter?)

    3/ No risk, they don t want to 2xplain nothing, not to give keys in the 9, but just because they don t know, and they don t want to take the risk to have an idea. Who s the 1st order, who s smoke, who Rey, who are those people, where are they, what s happen after the 6???? Why nothing seems change after 30 years, why ?? At least when I read younger the trilogie with Thrown, it was a Star Wars story!!! Something possible, something that I can accept as spectator, the diegetic was respected!! 

    Sorry guy but Disney and Katheleen didn t try to give you a good Star wars,  and this movie was not for you,  they try to give a random movie to be easy to spray around the word

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  33. Knock off :Unfortunately, you can check, how many entrances did those 2 movies. TLJ did really less than TFA, everywhere in world. Instead of the Lord of Ring. the hipe goes down. A Wind of change can rise, because even the business of toys is lower than they expect!!! First time ever. Only this can make fall Kathleen and marketing guys around her.

    After 8yo how wants a toys Rey, FLINN, VIOLETTE or poh? we know nothing about them, and it was in purpose!! its was a business strategy!! They failed.

    Marketing before scenarist. Even with a good realisator nothing can be saved  

    What reminds do you have from those 2 movies, almost nothing, Who buy the blue ray, or download the movie to see with pleasure this SW?; Rogue One yes, you have , you can even remember who they were!!!

    i grow up with Empire strike back and Return of the Jedi, only Rogue one looks as a Star Wars, with new characters that we care.

    Look, smell, tast of a star wars but it s not a star wars. its a just a Knock off.

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  34. Very easy Finn black and Kylo is white. Kylo one the main lead villain and Finn a supporting actor for Rey.

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  35. I feel the trilogy rests on the rise of skywalker. That will define the two that come before it as what they were meant to be and will determin whether the new films were necessary or a waste of time.

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  36. i feel like there a clear parallel between Finn and DJ and seeing DJ betray them motivates Finn to not only be are full fledged rebel but willing to die for his belief in the resistance/rebels

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  37. A well reasoned, well thought out video. I agree with many of your thoughts. This film has both moments of greatness and moments when I’m left a little dumbfounded. It’s a complicated film, which can’t be easily categorized one way or the other I feel

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  38. Besides Kylo Ren, this movie its by far the worse SW movies. Being difference doesn´t meant to change everything. You have to respect characters. Luke its funny and angry old the time. Thats not his character at all. If I made a new James Bond Movie, I cant make him insecure and gay just for being different and bring something new to the franchise. Thats not how it work. And Luke its just one example. And by the way all the sequence of Kylo, Rey and Snooke its the SAME thing of TESB. Nothing new!!!! Again the only good thing in this movie is KYLO and Im agree with his character arc its very good. As a writer if you make a movie about previous material its your responsibility to understand the universe and characters.

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  39. The second part in a trilogy has the least amount of responsibilities and restrictions, since it has time to develop new plots and characters and even explore paths that can be abandoned before the end. Arguably, it should be the one least likely to fail in it's mission statement. But TLJ spent most of it's runtime discarding things instead of introducing them. So, to feel empty and "unenthused" after exiting the theatre is perfectly normal. So did I.

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  40. if you take finn out of sw8, it literally changes nothing in the plot lol. fuck rian, he ruined it. Force awakens left so many ways a sequel could go, some great directions with story, and that idiot rian fucked it up

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  41. Rey should have turned. If they wanted different and unexpected, that would be it. Having the movie end with good vs evil, again, instead of grey area, is nothing new or daring. Kylo was well done. Rey was done terribly.

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  42. It's story arc is the problem. These movies are written like a subpar anime of which there are many. What I'm saying is, it's a very unremarkable trilogy

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  43. This story could have been a film about Rey learning something and connecting with Luke in a paternal way, thus growing both of their characters (Luke's troubled past with his father, and Rey's lack of family), while also being a buddy action movie with Poe and Finn in a B plot that focuses on Finn's origin and him learning to sacrifice for others. Poe could have also had some kind of arc. Maybe he learns about restraint because The force awakens kind of did Gary stu him as well. He could have learned about leadership and toning it back. Anyways, if they would have done that they could have made a good movie. This had potential. It was so easy to make a good story out of this. But no, dumpster fire.

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  44. They try to construct a profound arc character playing with the idea of Good and Evil but they finish exactly as where they were before

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  45. This series ruined the earlier series because it trivializes all the battles leia, luke, and han did in 3 films. Not to mention anakin's redemption.

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  46. I wish they wouldn’t have had the “empire” vs “rebellion” again, that whole premise killed it for me. Start from a the base of it still being 30 yrs past ROTJ but have Kylo feel the pull of the dark side and have him explore for Sith/dark side artifacts to learn… and go from there Just something I would
    Have rather seen than the muddled mess the Disney SW we have now. I liked R1 and Solo …

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  47. I literally have no fucking idea who Kylo Ren/Ben Solo even is.
    Why should I care if he doesn't turn back good? I don't even know how he was before he turned to the Dark Side!
    From all I saw between Force Awakens and Last Jedi, he's just a one-dimensional nutcase who flip flops all over the place when it's convenient for the story: he needs to save Rey from Snoke because otherwise she'd die, and he has to go back being a villain because otherwise there's no pointless battle on the salt planet.

    The directors, the zombie fans and actor can say that he's conflicted all they want, what they say doesn't match with what we're presented, it's exactly the same point you made about Finn; Rian can say that he's struggling between leaving or joining the Resistance all he wants, Finn still spends the whole story helping the Resistance, his actions >>> bullshit someone projects to make it look deeper than it is.

    As a whole The Last Jedi didn't take any risks, the only risk it took was fucking Luke up (because asking him to be helpful is just too much) and it just restored an Empire vs Rebellion scenario, all the Sequel Trilogy did was just retconning Return of the Jedi, essentially.
    Fucking people at Disney are either "Rehash a film, or do something completely nuts. There is NO middle ground."
    Yeah, Knights of the Old Republic and Clone Wars would like to have a talk. Doing good SW stuff is not impossible.

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  48. Thank you so very much for your respectful breakdown of this movie. I’m watching this a year later so I’ve seen the whole review loop. While I personally am not a huge fan of this controversial film. I know many enjoyed it. I do believe that only one of the characters in the movie got the proper arc however. That being, Kyle Ren. The big thing for Rian Johnson in this movie was subverting expectations, so when Kyle and Rey are trying to sway each other to their side, I believe this was the only point at which a subversion would be needed. This one scene could have done exactly what the rest of the movie did, but more than likely, would have spared some fan uproar. The only logical one to turn would be Rey.

    1. Snoke is gone so If Kylo turns, dumb bum hux becomes our main antagonist for the remainder of the movie.

    2. Rey has been an unstoppable force for two movies now, and to finally see her fall from her seat of greatness would have been great sequel bait for the house of Mouse.

    I feel you could “Play it safe” until the end and use this as your “I am your father twist” as a way to get butts in seats for the rise of skywalker.

    Thanks to anyone who takes the time to read this.

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  49. this was a great critique. rey and kylo were my favorite part of the movie and overall i liked it, but it left me feeling strange after watching it unlike the force awakens. i agree with most if what you've brought up, especially after listening to the commentary and watching the deleted scenes. thank you for a balanced and good commentary!

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  50. No one can make a video about such a divisive movie, and get the love from close to everyone. Respect. Also make a great video.

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  51. Finn's story was trashed in TLJ. He could have grown so much more. I thought he had chemistry with Ray, what happened to that?

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  52. To answer your question… no, I don't think so. TLJ will be remembered as controversial at best. Garbage at worst. That's how I'll remember it anyway.

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  53. I hav often wondered why parents, relatives, teachers, mentors etc. who failed you never see their errors and never apologize. Watching and hearing Luke apologizing to his nephew was cathartic.

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  54. I loved you vid even. I hope they can pull it off with episode 9, and ren was 100% the best part of the last jedi. Maybe they where rushed and weren't able to flesh out everyone or do any rescripting, and maybe if ray was a more likeable character in 8 I would accept the passing of the torch from Luke to ray, where Luke descends into darkness and ray picks up his mantle of positivity. But I can't accept this cuz ray is so unbelievable and alot of the movie just didn't support itself enough for me to continue to suspend my disbelief. I believe mark Hammel tried his best and did indeed sell the fact he is a bitter old man, but the fact he continues to be bitter in his final moments gives him no arc. Instead I'd have ray or Yoda give him a change of heart, reassuring ren that he can indeed come back to the light side, setting up another arch for ren in 9. Instead all we see Luke's first dialogue with ren as a taunting old man that's damning him, something only stoke had done so far. The ending makes it seem luke is actually more in alignment to the Sith instead of just not wanting to be a jedi. I think the story is good, though while the movie isn't, either because not enough time was given, bad direction and choreography, bad filler, or a bit of them all. I 100% understand the arches that they tried to implement, but it feels like they only had the time for just one, being ren's arch, and the major plot points that drive that arch. The 7th movie kinda also feels that way, ren being the only true fleshed out character with an arch.

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  55. The main problem with this film is how literally this idea of "subverting expectations" was taken by the writer/director. For example, they knew the audience was expecting Luke to be in awe of his old lightsaber, which was essentially a holy relic at that point; instead Luke looks at the lightsaber for a second and throws it over his shoulder off a cliff.

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  56. Fast forward 2 years annnnnnd hes not sure if hes getting his trilogy and Feige is stepping into his first love which is Star Wars hahahahahahahhahahahahahahahhaha oh man subversion dies and now LF is freaking out that EP9 wont rock the box office like the past two

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  57. I thought Fin's motivation for helping the resistance after his failed escape attempt was saving Rey–he was worried that Leia would call her back using the locator beacon and that she'd be killed by the pursuing First Order ships. It could have been made clearer, for sure.

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  58. Lol that wasn't a compliment from Mark Hamill, he was pointing out Rian Johnson didn't give a crap about the fans..

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  59. "The Force Awakens ended as a tease, leaving every question unanswered, and building excitement more with the promise of substance rather than substance itself."
    Speaking as someone who generally really likes JJ Abrams's output, that's the best description of most of his work I have ever heard.

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  60. Be careful that you do not take the lesson of the film from what the villain says, but rather the resolution of the hero. Kylo Ren was wrong about letting the past die. What did Rey and Luke learn? That is the lesson. Also, I agree Finn’s arc is the least compelling, and your reasoning is sound.

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  61. This whole Fucked up so called Trilogy is a not thought out, poorly slapped together pile of Pig Feces. After Last Jedi Many of us are done with Star Wars.

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  62. sorry but hell no, not in a million years would luke fucking skywalker try to kill a "kid" (young kylo) in order to prevent a new darth vader, there's no explanation to the fiasco festival it's this movie!

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  63. Sorry but in my opinion the throne room scene is one of the worst choreographed scenes I’ve ever scene

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  64. The Force Awakens left you excited for more? A beat-by-beat remake of the original Star Wars and a rehashed emperor character with a new name? To me, exactly the opposite. TFA felt like a big budget fan film with no new ideas. Or worse an insulting repackaging of the original that the filmmakers cynically concluded would go unnoticed or unchallenged by viewers. Which, judging by your reaction, is sadly true.

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  65. I didnt really like TFA or the TLJ, but I hold TLJ in infiniteely higher regard. better to fail by being too ambitious than fail because you were playing it safe. a swing and a miss is better than never even swinging at all

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