The urgency of intersectionality | Kimberlé Crenshaw

The urgency of intersectionality | Kimberlé Crenshaw


I’d like to try something new. Those of you who are able, please stand up. OK, so I’m going to name some names. When you hear a name
that you don’t recognize, you can’t tell me anything about them, I’d like you to take a seat and stay seated. The last person standing,
we’re going to see what they know. OK? (Laughter) All right. Eric Garner. Mike Brown. Tamir Rice. Freddie Gray. So those of you who are still standing, I’d like you to turn around
and take a look. I’d say half to most of the people
are still standing. So let’s continue. Michelle Cusseaux. Tanisha Anderson. Aura Rosser. Meagan Hockaday. So if we look around again, there are about four people
still standing, and actually I’m not going
to put you on the spot. I just say that to encourage transparency,
so you can be seated. (Laughter) So those of you who recognized
the first group of names know that these were African-Americans
who have been killed by the police over the last two and a half years. What you may not know is that the other list
is also African-Americans who have been killed
within the last two years. Only one thing distinguishes
the names that you know from the names that you don’t know: gender. So let me first let you know
that there’s nothing at all distinct about this audience that explains the pattern of recognition
that we’ve just seen. I’ve done this exercise
dozens of times around the country. I’ve done it to women’s
rights organizations. I’ve done it with civil rights groups. I’ve done it with professors.
I’ve done it with students. I’ve done it with psychologists.
I’ve done it with sociologists. I’ve done it even with
progressive members of Congress. And everywhere, the awareness
of the level of police violence that black women experience is exceedingly low. Now, it is surprising, isn’t it,
that this would be the case. I mean, there are two issues
involved here. There’s police violence
against African-Americans, and there’s violence against women, two issues that have been
talked about a lot lately. But when we think about
who is implicated by these problems, when we think about
who is victimized by these problems, the names of these black women
never come to mind. Now, communications experts tell us that when facts do not fit
with the available frames, people have a difficult time
incorporating new facts into their way of thinking
about a problem. These women’s names
have slipped through our consciousness because there are no frames
for us to see them, no frames for us to remember them, no frames for us to hold them. As a consequence, reporters don’t lead with them, policymakers don’t think about them, and politicians aren’t encouraged
or demanded that they speak to them. Now, you might ask, why does a frame matter? I mean, after all, an issue that affects black people
and an issue that affects women, wouldn’t that necessarily include
black people who are women and women who are black people? Well, the simple answer is that this is
a trickle-down approach to social justice, and many times it just doesn’t work. Without frames that allow us to see how social problems impact
all the members of a targeted group, many will fall through the cracks
of our movements, left to suffer in virtual isolation. But it doesn’t have to be this way. Many years ago, I began to use
the term “intersectionality” to deal with the fact
that many of our social justice problems like racism and sexism are often overlapping, creating multiple levels
of social injustice. Now, the experience
that gave rise to intersectionality was my chance encounter
with a woman named Emma DeGraffenreid. Emma DeGraffenreid
was an African-American woman, a working wife and a mother. I actually read about Emma’s story
from the pages of a legal opinion written by a judge
who had dismissed Emma’s claim of race and gender discrimination against a local car manufacturing plant. Emma, like so many African-American women, sought better employment
for her family and for others. She wanted to create a better life
for her children and for her family. But she applied for a job, and she was not hired, and she believed that she was not hired
because she was a black woman. Now, the judge in question
dismissed Emma’s suit, and the argument
for dismissing the suit was that the employer
did hire African-Americans and the employer hired women. The real problem, though, that the judge
was not willing to acknowledge was what Emma was actually trying to say, that the African-Americans
that were hired, usually for industrial jobs,
maintenance jobs, were all men. And the women that were hired, usually for secretarial
or front-office work, were all white. Only if the court was able to see
how these policies came together would he be able to see
the double discrimination that Emma DeGraffenreid was facing. But the court refused to allow Emma
to put two causes of action together to tell her story because he believed that,
by allowing her to do that, she would be able
to have preferential treatment. She would have an advantage
by having two swings at the bat, when African-American men and white women
only had one swing at the bat. But of course, neither
African-American men or white women needed to combine a race
and gender discrimination claim to tell the story of the discrimination
they were experiencing. Why wasn’t the real unfairness law’s refusal to protect
African-American women simply because their experiences
weren’t exactly the same as white women and African-American men? Rather than broadening the frame
to include African-American women, the court simply tossed their case
completely out of court. Now, as a student
of antidiscrimination law, as a feminist, as an antiracist, I was struck by this case. It felt to me like injustice squared. So first of all, black women weren’t allowed
to work at the plant. Second of all, the court
doubled down on this exclusion by making it legally inconsequential. And to boot, there was
no name for this problem. And we all know that,
where there’s no name for a problem, you can’t see a problem, and when you can’t see a problem,
you pretty much can’t solve it. Many years later, I had come to recognize that the problem that Emma was facing
was a framing problem. The frame that the court was using to see gender discrimination
or to see race discrimination was partial, and it was distorting. For me, the challenge that I faced was trying to figure out whether
there was an alternative narrative, a prism that would allow us
to see Emma’s dilemma, a prism that would allow us
to rescue her from the cracks in the law, that would allow judges to see her story. So it occurred to me, maybe a simple analogy to an intersection might allow judges
to better see Emma’s dilemma. So if we think about this intersection,
the roads to the intersection would be the way that the workforce
was structured by race and by gender. And then the traffic in those roads
would be the hiring policies and the other practices
that ran through those roads. Now, because Emma
was both black and female, she was positioned precisely
where those roads overlapped, experiencing the simultaneous impact of the company’s gender and race traffic. The law — the law is
like that ambulance that shows up and is ready to treat Emma
only if it can be shown that she was harmed
on the race road or on the gender road but not where those roads intersected. So what do you call
being impacted by multiple forces and then abandoned to fend for yourself? Intersectionality seemed to do it for me. I would go on to learn
that African-American women, like other women of color, like other socially marginalized people
all over the world, were facing all kinds
of dilemmas and challenges as a consequence of intersectionality, intersections of race and gender, of heterosexism, transphobia,
xenophobia, ableism, all of these social dynamics come together and create challenges
that are sometimes quite unique. But in the same way that intersectionality raised our awareness to the way
that black women live their lives, it also exposes the tragic circumstances under which African-American women die. Police violence against black women is very real. The level of violence
that black women face is such that it’s not surprising that some of them do not survive
their encounters with police. Black girls as young as seven, great grandmothers as old as 95 have been killed by the police. They’ve been killed in their living rooms, in their bedrooms. They’ve been killed in their cars. They’ve been killed on the street. They’ve been killed
in front of their parents and they’ve been killed
in front of their children. They have been shot to death. They have been stomped to death. They have been suffocated to death. They have been manhandled to death. They have been tasered to death. They’ve been killed
when they’ve called for help. They’ve been killed when they were alone, and they’ve been killed
when they were with others. They’ve been killed shopping while black, driving while black, having a mental disability while black, having a domestic disturbance while black. They’ve even been killed
being homeless while black. They’ve been killed
talking on the cell phone, laughing with friends, sitting in a car reported as stolen and making a U-turn
in front of the White House with an infant strapped
in the backseat of the car. Why don’t we know these stories? Why is it that their lost lives don’t generate the same amount
of media attention and communal outcry as the lost lives
of their fallen brothers? It’s time for a change. So what can we do? In 2014, the African-American
Policy Forum began to demand that we “say her name” at rallies, at protests, at conferences, at meetings, anywhere and everywhere that state violence against black bodies
is being discussed. But saying her name is not enough. We have to be willing to do more. We have to be willing to bear witness, to bear witness
to the often painful realities that we would just rather not confront, the everyday violence and humiliation
that many black women have had to face, black women across color, age, gender expression, sexuality and ability. So we have the opportunity right now — bearing in mind that some of the images
that I’m about to share with you may be triggering for some — to collectively bear witness
to some of this violence. We’re going to hear the voice
of the phenomenal Abby Dobson. And as we sit with these women, some who have experienced violence
and some who have not survived them, we have an opportunity to reverse what happened
at the beginning of this talk, when we could not stand for these women because we did not know their names. So at the end of this clip,
there’s going to be a roll call. Several black women’s names will come up. I’d like those of you who are able
to join us in saying these names as loud as you can, randomly, disorderly. Let’s create a cacophony of sound to represent our intention to hold these women up, to sit with them, to bear witness to them, to bring them into the light. (Singing) Abby Dobson: Say, say her name. Say, say her name. (Audience) Shelly! (Audience) Kayla! AD: Oh, say her name. (Audience shouting names) Say, say, say her name. Say her name. For all the names I’ll never know, say her name. KC: Aiyanna Stanley Jones,
Janisha Fonville, Kathryn Johnston, Kayla Moore, Michelle Cusseaux, Rekia Boyd, Shelly Frey, Tarika, Yvette Smith. AD: Say her name. KC: So I said at the beginning, if we can’t see a problem, we can’t fix a problem. Together, we’ve come together
to bear witness to these women’s lost lives. But the time now is to move from mourning and grief to action and transformation. This is something that we can do. It’s up to us. Thank you for joining us. Thank you. (Applause)

100 Comments on "The urgency of intersectionality | Kimberlé Crenshaw"


  1. So we need to change definitions, in order to create a solution, to solve an imaginary problem. Genius.

    Reply

  2. I'm black and I've been harrassed by the police. I'm here to confirm that this is mostly complete bullshit. Almost any time someone starts a talk by doing the "I'm doing a list of names now! I'm doing my listing this means I'm right and great!" it's pretty much guaranteed to be bullshit reasoning. The vast majority of police shootings are justified or extremely murky or just tragic accidents. Very rarely, when looking at the full picture, are there cases of clear malice or horrible negligence that can be cogently argued to have roots in racism

    Reply

  3. i agree with what she said in this video
    but I rarely agree with what intersectional feminists say
    except the original author she seems reasonable

    Reply

  4. Can someone give me the name of a white/hispanic man or white woman shot and killed by police?

    If so, please sit down.

    Reply

  5. It doesn't seem like you really care about these people. It seems like all you care about is their race and gender.

    Reply

  6. Why is there no warning on this talk about how its unsubstantiated and there is no data to back it up?

    Reply

  7. Meagan Hockaday, March 28, 2015 Oxnard California. RIP. Shot multiple times by Oxnard PD Roger Garcia

    Reply

  8. Anyone else think that maybe the people who were hired got the job because, idk this sounds kinda crazy, maybe they actually deserved it more than the other people who applied? If she had the right qualifications, and experience, and a good CV, I’m not saying she didn’t, I don’t know, she may have got the job, but she also may not have. Because someone may have had more experience, or more qualifications. It may have been her interview. Also if she went running to court blaming her gender and race I’d say that she was putting herself in a box right there. Most people just ask for constructive criticism, which you may not get, but it’s worth asking, and go on and try to improve their business approach to their work life. Just my opinion, I’m open for a polite discussion, but please don’t hate

    Reply

  9. The original experiment is methodologically flawed. She always gets the same results because she's not doing the tests independently. Instead of mentioning men first, then mentioning women to those still standing only, and concluding that the public knows more about men than about women because there's less people standing at the end is wrong. She should have counted the people standing after mentioning the men, then ask everybody to stand again, mention the women, then count again. This, of course, controlling for relevant factors, such as availability of video footage of the event, etc.
    This is not necessarily about gender, but it might be about data availability, because, you know, correlation does not imply causation.

    Reply

  10. She is a blatant manipulator. How many names of white people killed by people of color does she know? How many names of colored policemen who killed people of color do she know? How many names of Korean people who died in robberies in the riots of 1992 do you know? Interculturality is creating enemies where there are none. It is to make victims without analyzing the causes.

    Reply

  11. Kimberlé: points out how someone can have more than one problem

    The Comments: SCREEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEECH

    Reply

  12. Twice the amount of whites are killed every year than blacks…. It's very simple, single mothers raise criminals who resist arrest. If you don't want blacks getting shot by police stop raising criminals. I remember these psychos even protested a black police officer killing a black criminal in Milwaukee and called the black officer racist. I feel sorry for anyone who listens to this professional victim.

    Reply

  13. oh look its the church of intersectionality where facts dont matter and the victim points are free. Q: Is there any name mentioned that isnt linked to a crime or threat to officers responding to a 911-call. Guess the answer

    Reply

  14. Why is the behavior of these victims never talked about, mentioned or discussed? They were just innocent people minding their own business, when the evil police officer potentially gave up his pension, the whole point of working your whole life as a police officer, to hunt them down and murder them, or beat them to death. Most cases are disingenuinly presented by the liberal media, and the behavior of the victim is never mentioned or called into question…ever, like it has no bearing on the situation when it has all the bearing on the situation. Stop lying. Start teaching kids how to act around police officers and 98% of the situations will turn out better. Intersectionality is cancer. This woman is a liar and spreading a disease that she hopes will destroy our country. Sing A soulful song. Disingenuinley present "facts". Make people angry by giving them false information. Never teach people how to act around the police. Spread disease of intersectionality. Treason complete.

    Reply

  15. So…instead of being judged as person…I'm being judged solely because I'mm Hispanic? That I the very definition of racism….this ideology is just political-correctness and I am getting sick and tired of the victimhood culture.

    I'm an American, not a 'victim'

    Reply

  16. How i love 'murica for those idiots caged in their ignorance, that people may have to suffer from more than one disadvantage. Just pathetic, but here in Germany it also get's worse with the same people just with a different language.

    Reply

  17. Intersectionality THE NEW RELIGION. She invites us to 'Bare witness' . Now these fucking fruit loops are using the TED TALK to endorse their irrational racist bigoted ideology and give it some kind of validity. She even dresses and talks like one of those evangelist con artist preachers. BAsically hate 'whiteness' they'll be burning us at the stake just now and our only crime will be the colour of our skin.

    Reply

  18. Thank you for sharing this informative and inspiring video… 16:30 ~ 17:30 McKenna, Alexia Christina, Shelley Frey, Kayla Moore, Michelle Cusseaux, Tanisha Anderson, Rekia Boyd, Aiyanna Stanley Jones, Shantel Davis, Aura Rosser, Gabriella Nevarez, India Kager, Kendra James, Kyam Livingston, Alesia Thomas, Meagan Hockaday, Miriam Carey, Pearlie Golden, Yvette Smith, Kusha Michael, India Beaty, Symone Marshall, Jessica Williams, Korryn Gaines, Deborah Danner are named, and my thoughts go to Ms.Erica Garner whose suffering from violence affecting her family was so great that she lost her life as a result… 🙏

    Reply

  19. I came to see this TED talk because Jonathan Haidt told me that he couldn't see anything wrong with it.

    Reply

  20. But she could always bake cakes for marrying homosexuals, right? Or is it too sexist to suggest women bake cakes?

    Reply

  21. Oh, this just makes me sick. How about the police assassinated by blacks? I'm so sick of this.

    Reply

  22. The term(theory) is the point, right? She is using her personal experience to convey a point(theory). I think the point(theory) has much validity.

    Reply

  23. Julius Caesar, Pompey, Caligula. Marcus Lepidus, Gaius Memmius, Lucius Scribonius Libo. How many of those do you know? Oh, you know Caesar, Pompey and Caligula? CLASSIST!!!! YOU CHAUVINIST PIG. They were ALL consuls of Rome around the same time. This proves you prefer much more accomplished men from wealthier families over those who aren't as accomplished and wealthy. Prejudice. Must implement intersectional history. One of the stupidest women ever on TED. Only the woman who was going on about her son being a feminist was stupider. Except that woman wasn't a PROFESSOR OF LAW. BUAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAJ

    Reply

  24. MY GROUP is a bigger victim than YOURS! Who ever cries loudest and is most offended FIRST wins and the other loses. This is about winning and losing and not about getting along. You are right, i am wrong. Period. Otherwise, you are fired or kicked out of the group in one way or another. The world hasn't changed much since the days when people were burned at the stake or killed for being heretics. Socrates is rolling in his grave. LaoTsu is saying, "I told you so!". Would the majority of citizens have more power if we all stood up for each others rights? YES! But, don't tell me that I have to agree with all of your ideas. I will stand up for your rights ONLY if you stand up for mine.

    Reply

  25. The comments are a referendum on our education system, which is almost all system and no education. Admit that you don't remember 99% of the random facts you rote memorized but got As for cramming into your head for a test, yet still feel "educated" because you got those As.

    Reply

  26. Where are the statistics? If black people are shot more often by police than white people and black women more often than black men, that's terrible and could be the result of racism+sexism. But I think you need statistics to make such a claim and not assume it is so because of the color of the person's skin.

    Reply

  27. What is she talking about? In 2018, 942 men were shot to death by the police in the US and 53 women.

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/585149/people-shot-to-death-by-us-police-by-gender/

    Is this sexism against men then? I don't know, because as far as I know men do get into crime way more than women. But sexism against men surely could be at play.

    I don't think it's fair or realistic to just assume that women are disadvantaged in every situation.

    Reply

  28. Martin Luther King Jr. would be sickened and probably embarrassed to know that modern African Americans are completely dissociated from his message. He fought to be seen as an equal to white people. Now, since that has been achieved, AA want to be seen as a protected class. MLK wanted everyone, regardless of color, religion, or creed, to have equal opportunity. We have achieved that. Intersectionality is wanting to have equal outcome. Sounds a lot like marxist propaganda. You will never convince me that equal outcome is 'moral' or 'just'. It is literally the opposite. Everyone deserve equal opportunity, but don't expect a hand out of power or prominence just because you are a woman or have more melanin in your skin. Quit telling yourself that you are a victim. If you think you can't, you are correct and will not.

    Reply

  29. Absolute disgusting radical leftism! Using emotional arguments to problematize an outcome to which there is no evidence to support it being problematized. Black women dying from police means nothing unless you can prove that the oppressed group or intersection of oppressed groups is the cause. Most of the examples of black men dying from police where deemed to be reasonable force and justified based on the actions of the person not because they were black. A person regardless of their race attempting to reach for a police officers gun after robbing a store would cause any police officer to fear for their life and react accordingly. The radical left takes no consideration into the factors that result in the outcome of individuals of the group other than their race r gender or intersection of oppressed groups absolutely defined by the self proclaimed progressive saviors like Crenshaw. TED should not legitimize radicals like Crenshaw. The like dislike ration and comments show just how superficial and reprehensible views like Crenshaw are.

    Reply

  30. The job application is not a single one for manual labor and secretary, it's a different one for each one of these jobs. You can make a case for sexism and racism for each one of them independently. So there's no need for the concept of intersectionality (at least in that example).

    Reply

  31. Her prime example is faulty reasoning.

    The African-American woman was not hired. African-American males and white women have been hired. Therefore there must be discrimination against African-American women? How can she just pretend there were no other variables?

    I am not saying that discrimination is not a possibility, but you cannot rule in favor of someone in a lawsuit if that is all the evidence you have. Why does she not go into any of that?

    Reply

  32. I agree with the point that only certain marginalized people garner attention. I think we should know the stories of these African-American women. I applaud her awareness-raising.

    By the same token, I bet no one can name four poor, white males killed by police brutality in recent years. Why is that?

    Once people can acknowledge that that is also a problem, we will have come a long way.

    Reply

  33. Collectively judging people as per their group identity and not their personal identity is the very essence of racist, discriminatory mentality! I wonder how all these so called rights activists seem so unable to grasp this very elementary concept!

    Reply

  34. Intersectionality card, the world doesn't cater to my specific circumstances so It's wrong! The problem has to be the world, it can't be me!

    Reply

  35. This is full of bias. People who sit when she tells the male names might have known female names, but since she asks them to stay seated you can't know. Of course she doesn't start with female names. Her methodology is more than questionnable. 
    She also compares violence against women with police violence, the latter being way more present in the media than the first, not because of some discrimination or frame, but because police violence is something people tend to particularly care about, while "ordinary violence" is not. We can deplore it, but there's no evidence of systemic discrimination for that.
    Then she proceeds to make a generalization from a single anecdote. She implies several times that being a woman or being black leads to the same prejudice, and even (that's almost obscene) that being homeless and being black is comparable. She uses like 5 different metaphors to explain what is a double prejudice, but never shows evidence of how this affects people in a statistically significant way. She spends a lot of time listing names, death causes and pictures of dead people, playing on an emotional level, and not a single time does she refer to anything factually based.
    I'm surprised and worried that so many people liked this and take this as anything else but a personal opinion.

    Reply

  36. What about all the murders done by black people against other races . Mostly their own race . Why is roughly 7 percent of the population responsible for 52 percent of all murders. .. facts dont care about your feelings the black community has a real violence problem. And it isnt white people or the cops.

    Reply

  37. I havent yet finished the video, but the test was biased for no reason? Why didnt she have everyone stand up again, before naming the women? I think the result would still show, that more people knew the 4 names of the men, but by setting the 4 women as second, the starting point was 50% smaller already. Also the conclusion that gender is the only difference would need some sort of evidence? It makes no sense to me at this point, I think that police killing of a woman would generate an even stronger response from the public, why would the media choose not to include these stories??

    Reply

  38. Ok so, 2:18 – I am from Europe, so I really did not hear about these cases, I had to look them up. Tanisha died a sudden death due to her medical problems, while being restrained, she was not harmed by the police at all. Megan died by getting shot, mid-stabbing the police officer/her husband. Aura died when attacking two police officers with a knife. And Michele died when she opened her door with a claw hammer raised over her head facing the officers…
    So… if you claim racism here, you have to point out WHY the above information is not a sufficient reason for the police action and if they would react differently if the person on the other side was a white man. I find it very likely, that the same officer, in the same situation (with the women being actually white men) would probably shoot even sooner…
    I dont agree with how often US police uses multiple leathal shots as a selfdefence measure in some cases, but NOTHING about these cases seems to me out of the US ordinary method. Your police uses guns in this manner on EVERYONE.

    Reply

  39. To be fair, the example with the african american lady is logical. That is a good argument, that is a case of discrimination based on two connected factors. I agree. Unlike the black women killed due to their violent attacks.

    Reply

  40. 12:30 and back to the nonsence – replace the "black women" with anything else and the presentation is still true. "white homosexual trans men" have been killed doing stuff. "black tall men" have been killed doing stuff. "asian fat women" were killed while doing stuff. "white straight men" were killed while doing stuff. "hispanic children" were killed while doing stuff… NONE OF THIS provides any reason to think that the police are specially targeting any of these groups. The Emma Dilemma example WAS an example, but that is not enough right? we need to get violence and death into the equation, even though you dont have a clear example how this is a case of intersectional oppresion AT ALL… Sad. Why dont you stick to the point that is actually TRUE?

    Reply

  41. Yes, its time to change. Dont report on "police violence" based on race or gender AT ALL. And report on police violence based on where the violence was unjustified. The four examples given in the beginning (which I checked online) were all killed under US standard practice. Im not saying its a good practice, but it is practiced against all genders and races.

    Reply

  42. Great talk. Thank you for us to see the problem. We see the problem, and I hope we are on the right track to solve the the problem.

    Reply

  43. Divide and conquer, brought to you by the diverse tolerant inclusive mouth-noise makers. Next up, why it's urgent to rid the world of all things not in my favor.

    Reply

  44. Insane mumbo jumbo. We take the radical relativism and nihilism of French postmodernism and cross-breed it with identity politics and then we promise, just promise that a nihilist-activist hybrid which is logically inconsistent will save the world. It makes no sense on any level.

    Reply

  45. In a nutshell: teach kids to rank people by race (like a kkk member would) and present the exact ranking a klansman would give. You know, brainwash them into thinking like a racist.

    Then tell them they have extreme prejudice that they must destroy and while they’re wrestling with themselves, they should police the rest of the world too.

    Smart. Not dysfunctional. Not emotional and psychological abuse at all.

    Reply

  46. Don't buy it!! Called Out As BS!! This is not scholarship…it's propaganda…not science of any kind!! Intersectionality is a Trojan horse!! It's a tool of aggrieved post-modernists and radical feminitsts to hoodwink the Liberal Left into buying into group ideology and identity politics!! Cranshaw's divisive ideas can't hold up to scrutiny…which is why the very core of her "intersectionality" argument denounces questioning the bases for it!! Imagine if science did not allow rigorous debate and questioning of hypotheses and theories…no peer reviews…all designed to get to the TRUTH!! !! Imagine that!! This crap may be okay on the campuses (oh what a scary thought) where the Humanities have been infected with a far left virus called identity politics, PC, safe spaces, attacks on free speech!! They've got a captive audience for this crap!! Shame on you TED!!

    Reply

  47. To get the Truth see James Lyndsay Trojan Horse series where he carves up the dissembling of the likes of Cranshaw; also see, Jordan Peterson explicating on the fallacies of the Campus post-modernists, safe-spacers, trigger warning malcontents, grievance studiers, PCers and identity politics promoters infecting, at the very least, the Humanities Departments.

    Reply

  48. Stumbled upon this searching for "is intersectionality a religion" and I'm getting outta here before I get angry

    Reply

  49. Two words for this race baiting hackademic fool who is educated far beyond her intelligence. CANDACE OWENS

    Reply

  50. Competency over Framing, Character over Characteristics. Logic over Emotion. Parading the sins of errant cops and the pain of the victims and then mixing them with your hateful manipulation of the crowd is not only repugnant–it is telling of your lust for power.

    Reply

  51. Wait a minute, the first group was killed BY POLICE (and that is why we know about them). Were the women on the second list killed by police? Why doesn't she tell us what happened to them, give us some facts rather than innuendo?

    Reply

  52. Hillary is truly an inspiration to all young girls everywhere. She showed them that if you work really hard at an elite school, get admitted to one of the best universities and graduate at the top of your class from Yale Law School, then you can marry a really powerful man and ride his coattails all the way up and eventually get a job as a secretary. You go girl!

    Reply

  53. Intersectionality is a great organizing tool . It creates the illusion of a common cause for various groups . Power brokers have used it as a means to concentrate voting power .

    Reply

  54. Is gender the ONLY difference in the beginner tho?
    Is she an academic?
    What are the exact circumstances of these cases?
    This is pretty cringe.

    Reply

  55. Wow. Mrs. Crenshaw sounds so reasonable. But it leads to insanity like this…https://youtu.be/C9SiRNibD14

    Reply

  56. Lots of these people aren't victims. Like Michael Brown. WTF do you think is going to happen when you try to take a cop's gun? Good riddance.

    Reply

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