Tireur DP-28 soviet – Review d’uniforme

Tireur DP-28 soviet – Review d’uniforme


Hello everyone and welcome to this new video of uniform presentation. Today I will introduce Soviet uniform worn during winter periods by a DP-28 Gunner. Above all, I must clarify some things. First of all, I don’t pretend to know everything. So if you have any comments on the outfit I’ll introduce you, then you probably know more than me. Then this video is not intended to be a bible: it must not spare you to seek your own information in books, in specialized magazines or on the Internet. With original photos, it is easy to contradict me, but be aware that it’s not because a given configuration is not found in pictures that it has never existed, and this isn’t because there is a picture that was regulatory. You will find the entire list-kit in the description of this video with the corresponding timing. History of the Battle of the Dnieper After the Battle of Kursk and the counter-offensive of the Red Army in mid-August 1943, Hitler takes a forceful defensive strategy, his army being inexperienced because of huge losses at Stalingrad and Kursk. Stalin, meanwhile, continues to release the regions occupied by the Germans and aims coal of Donbass, in Ukraine. But this requires crossing the Dnieper River to reach the right bank, fortified by the Germans. The Dnieper is the third largest river in Europe after the Volga and the Danube, reaching over three kilometers wide in its lower part. August 24th, 1943, over a length of 1400 kilometers, between Smolensk and the Sea of Azov, 45 armies of the Red Army were moved towards the west. This represents 2.65 million men, equipped with 51,000 artillery pieces, 2,400 armored vehicles and 2,800 aircraft. In front, the Germans have 1,250,000 men, 12,500 artillery pieces, 2,100 tanks and 2,000 aircraft. However, the fight is difficult, German covering their retreat and leaving troops in each city to delay to the maximum the Soviet advance. It even happened that cities stayed German while Soviet troops were moving around and continued to advance. These cities surrendered after a few time. On September 15, Hitler ordered his troops to retreat behind the river. At the end of the month, the Soviets reach the lower part of the Dnieper. An airborne operation is launched by the Soviet the September 24th to facilitate the crossing, but in vain. The first wave arrived with their friends in the Soviet lines, and the river itself; The second wave was landed with 5,000 men on the German bank but had not enough anti-tank weapons. There were completely submerged. The question then arises for the Red Army: how to cross the Dnieper, while the right bank to conquer is higher and covered with German fortifications? For political reasons primarily – Stalin wanting to occupy Kiev before November 7th – the Soviet command will push through on a wide front, getting ahead the German. The soldiers will then use anything that can float to cross the river in a dense enemy fire, then buried on the right bank of the Dnieper. This strategy will work: At the end of the month, it has twenty-three bridgeheads, some having ten kilometers of wide, and deep of one or two kilometers. The Germans tried to counter-attack, but in vain, all bridgeheads having held, for the price of horrific losses, certain divisions only align more than half or even a quarter of their workforce. The Battle of the Dnieper is completed after the Second Battle of Kiev, which was taken after several months of hard fighting. The outcome of this great battle gives astronomical numbers: Indeed, there were over 300 000 deaths and almost one million of casualties. In comparison, it makes so many deaths at the battle of Verdun in 1916, and this is more than double the number of injured of Verdun. Early 1943, Stalin wanted to highlight the patriotic spirit by restoring some elements specific to Tsarist times: He did change the jackets with the order 25 of January 15, 1943 by adding shoulder boards, in addition to have added new decorations and new orders in his army. So all the jackets of the Red Army were changed between 1 and 15 February 1943. This jacket has a collar closed by two buttons and has elbow patches, which may not be present on some models. Chest pockets are widespread on the last part of the war, but early jackets from 1943 didn’t have. The khaki canvas becomes whitish after washes or steam delousing. Russia adopted the same pants for men of the troops and NCOs from 1914. Throughout the ages, it has only had a few changes. We find a martingale on the back to get a first size adjustment, and loops are present to use a belt. It wasn’t possible to use straps. All trousers, regardless of their manufacture, generally have the same cut, with riding breeches and a lace for tightening ankle, facilitating insertion into the boots. The M38 boots were designed with technology “Kirza”, technology developed by the chemist Ivan Plotnikov to overcome the lack of leather boots and then can equip millions of soldier. The low boots were used with leggings, but troops in combat largely preferred the high boots. Until today, the Kirza is produced by methods of war. Specialists say that more than 150 million pairs of boots were produced across the history. Leather boots had rubber soles to more isolate the boot than with classic leather sole. The Russian having a very rude climate, they needed something to be protected at maximum from the cold that the Germans hadn’t considered as a priority. The outfit Telogreika was designed to keep warm, even in extreme temperatures. It was placed over the conventional uniform. The quilted pants model 1932, also called in Russian “Vatnie-Sharovari” had the same cut as the classic pants with drawstrings calf, but was a high waist pants, and cotton was placed in bolsters, to keep body heat inside, without losing mobility. The M38 boots naturally came on top. Martingale on the back allows adjusting the size of the pants, and loops are available to allow wearing a belt. To complete pants, Telogreika or quilted jacket model 1932 was made on the same principle as the pants. Two side pockets allow to carry a little bit of equipment, an inside pocket allowed to carry a wallet. Martingale on the back lets you adjust the jacket to the size of the soldier, the latter to be worn close to the body for optimum heat. It closes with 5 buttons. If you wear a M35 jacket below, it will be overtaken the collar over, so as to see the collar tabs, so the ranks. The collar may seem a little tight, but this is quite normal, this jacket is indeed my size, made to measure. Despite it gives an aspect of Michelin man, it was very demanded by the Germans. Introduced by the order of the Revolutionary Military Council of the USSR number 14 in January 1931, the Finka is a flat fur hat for officers. However, the photos show that this cap was also used by the troops, hence its presence here for our soldier. This is the ancestor of Chapka-Ushanka, which included flaps to cover the ears, to put on top of the cap. It has fur that can be of different colors depending on the model and manufacturing and the flaps can be detached to cover more easily the ears. Soviet star is placed in the middle of the front, which can’t be folded. The Soviet soldier was not richly equipped, this one having to be mobile. The package was contained in the truck or in the barracks. On him, he had the bare subsistence level, hooked to the belt to be agile and able to be mobile over long distances. In addition, the number of Soviet soldiers prevented them from having a lot of equipment by individuals, the soldier being considered as consumable in the eyes of the staff. The canvas and leather belt appeared in 1938 and became widespread throughout the conflict, it is more economical to produce than leather belt, and requiring less maintenance. On the belt we find spare pouch in canvas for Mosin-Nagant in which we find an F1 grenade, defensive hand grenade fragmentation inspired by the French model of 1915. Note that F1 grenade from that time should be olive green with a detonator and a pin colored in aluminum, which is a mistake here. There could be aluminum canteen, other in glass. This is a post-war sanded canteen, slipped into a bag Type 38 with a flap and a hook for the belt, facilitating its use compared with the classical cover. The 1941 model bread bag is placed over the belt and allowed the soldier to carry his daily portion of food, consisting mainly of bread. Each soldier was equipped with a single shovel to bury and protect themselves, fill sandbags or dig trenches. It was slipped into a canvas and leather case which was found throughout the conflict. To be practical, economical and easy to carry, assault pack model 1930 was a canvas backpack that could be of various colors, but mainly in green and brown. It allowed to contain all the toiletries, the mess kit in its cover, and the few changes of clothing, namely socks, leggings and combat rations. It’s inspired by Tsarist model 1910 and his suspenders model were also used as closure. A flap allowed to connect both straps together for easy maintenance when they had to run or crawl. This prevented the straps to leave from their location on each shoulder. The assault pack M1930 was named “Myeschok” in Russian. The half-tent, or Plastch Palatka, was folded in bolster, passed on the shoulder. It needs two to mount a tent with the two half-sections carried by each soldier. The tent canvas could also serve as a poncho. Both ends meet at one point, fixed roughly by a rapid canvas strap. You decide if you prefer to wear on the left shoulder, as here, or on the right shoulder, as in my video review of the autumn uniform, which can be less convenient to shoot with a gun, but this may reduce recoil for the most sensitive. It happened very often that soldiers use ammunition and explosives from the enemy. Thus the soldier chose to wear a German handgrenade Type 24, or Stielhandgranate, known as potato masher. This grenade is composed of a wooden handle with an explosive charge placed in the head of the grenade. This is a very successful artificial reproduction, thereby realizing the weight of this armament. The heads could be unscrewed to easily form a grenade set with a handle and 6 or 7 assembled heads. On the bottom is placed a cap, which will reveal a small string, you’ll have to pull to light the fuse located in the detonator. Once lit fuse, you will have a total of 5 seconds to throw the grenade before it exploded. The checkered caps could be added on top of the grenade to add a fragmentation effect. About the wearing of the grenade on the belt: Be careful not to lose too much mobility, misplaced grenade could damage your ribs when falling on the front. The DP-28 being a collective weapon, it was customary to find a provider transporting ammunition, this provider being at the disposal of the gunner. However, the lack of troops in certain sections could bring the shooter to be alone on his machine gun, so to be alone to carry ammunition. The special bag for DP28 magazines allowed to transport piled magazines, or contain the special box for carrying 3 magazines in fixed locations to avoid they collide. The canvas bag was equipped with a steel buckle, stitched on a leather leg. It was also equipped, on top, of two flaps sealed with lace, so as to carry the box without locking it, because the closing of the transport case is on the side, so in an inaccessible place once slipped into the bag. The bag with the box and 3 empty magazines weighs 8 kg. With 3 garnished magazines with 47 cartridges, the total weight reaches 15 kg. The infantry machine gun known as DP-28 was the first Soviet machine gun designed after the revolution. It was massively used during World War II despite some flaws. A main was the expansion of the recoil spring after prolonged fire, causing shooting incidents. The bipod was also considered as fragile and not very practical. His weight of 9,12kg when it was empty, for 11,9kg with a filled magazine of 47 cartridges of 7.62mm x 54R (ammunition of the Mosin-Nagant) was also a black point on the mobility of the gun. The circular magazine was locked on top, and the cocking lever was below the gun’s body. It was possible, and advisable, to add a sling to facilitate its transport, or even to shoot while standing, even it was very difficult to hit a target in this position. Note that the DP-28 is neutralized and acquired before April 2016, therefore perfectly legal despite the possible manipulation of the magazine, trigger and bolt. The bipod can be locked in folded position, but this will bother handling of the cocking lever, and can even block it when shooting. Do not let your hands on the lower part, or you’ll lose fingers when firing, the cocking lever is movable. The trigger has a safety: we must push a small wedge before operating the trigger. Here is how the gunners were equipped with machine gun DP28 during winter battles after 1943. The provider, if there is one, will carry a bag of additional DP-28 magazines, or the gunner’s bag if there was only one. The bag will be placed on the side where there isn’t the machine gun, in order to balance the loads during transportation. SUMMARY The M35 trousers were the regulatory pants throughout the Soviet Army in 1935. This model is an evolution of the model from 1914, the base remains very similar for troops men and NCOs. The officers, meanwhile, had their own pants. It is made of strong brown canvas, has reinforced knees and a series of loops allows to attach a belt. Note there are two possible stages of these loops. The pants closes with buttons and a metal hook to slip into a metal loop, to secure the closure and relieve pressure on the buttons. The M43 blouse is the direct evolution of the M35 jacket, already shown in another video of uniform presentation. There was also a hybrid version between the two to make the transition from the old model, with grades on the neck, to the new, with wide shoulder straps. The first versions of M43 jackets have been released without breast pockets for enlisted men, but the pockets are quickly returned because practical to store the booklet and other small equipment. The M43 jacket has a high neck with two buttons. The on-pants M1932 is part of the whole Telogreika or quilted uniform, designed to keep warm during the harsh winter months. This pant has almost the same cut as the M35 pants, but has a single small pocket in the front. It also has laces encircling the calf to allow insertion into the boots. There is also reinforcement on the knees. The lower leg is slightly less provided in cotton lining to be able to move without being too bothered by the thickness. The pants can also receive a belt, with two points possible, large loops are sewn in the middle to divide in two. To complete the Telogreika set, we add the quilted jacket M1932. Composed in the same way as the pants, it’s equipped with parallel rods along the entire length of the jacket. It closes with 5 buttons for fixing the 5 loops that stand out from left pan of the jacket. The buttons are shifted. She has two small pockets on the sides and a martingale in the back to adjust the size to the soldiers’ morphology. There are several models of Telogreika, but all are very similar. If you wear a M35 jacket below, you will bring out the collar over the quilted jacket. Despite it’s a copy made to measure by a famous Belarusian manufacturer, we can notice the presence of a label with a very well reproduced marking. Be careful to choose your size, even taking slightly larger: remember that you must wear a uniform underneath. The M38 boots are boots regulatory Red Army. They are in leather with a rubber sole. These are postwar boots, more economical to find that copies of real M38, which differ only by the pattern of the sole, made of dots. Be careful with the size of your boots, the pants and over-trousers have to pass completely without crashing your calf. The Finka M1931 was used heavily by the officers during the Winter War against Finland in 1939 and 1940. Hence its name earned during that period, Finka being short for Finland. But quickly, fur cap was distributed without rank distinction to the whole troop, whether for privates or NCOs. It differs from Chapka Ushanka, appeared after, with the shape of its flaps, they can’t be tied on top of the cap. These flaps are fur while to top is sheep wool. The interior is cotton, sawn to keep a rigid assembly on the head. The flaps are retained rights through two hooks on each side at the front of the hat. It’s possible to fold the sides over to protect the ears and the neck. Soviet star is placed at the cap’s front, embedded in the fur. In order to right place your Finka on your head, don’t hesitate to use your finger to align your nose with the star. It was use during the second war, however, was less noticed than Chapka Ushanka. There are different colors of fur and wool to paste at best with the environment, which can be more or less frozen. The webbing of EM was not very garnished, these being considered as “consumable” from the eyes of quartermaster. So the equipment were still very rustic and inexpensive. The belt in leather and canvas allows holding the necessary equipment for the survival of the Soviet soldier. So we find the steel shovel with a wooden handle, slid into the holster canvas with leather closure and a steel buckle. In the middle of the belt, we find the bread bag M1941, here emptied. Then the aluminum canteen slid into cover type 38, closed by a lace. An additional spare pouch lets slip an F1 grenade. This defensive grenade should be olive green with a pin, a detonator and a lever colored in aluminum. This set does not weigh very heavy, but the worst is to come with the following equipment. The assault pack model 1930 was wide spread throughout the war, because of its hardiness and for its cheap production: a simple pocket with loops to be both straps, but also the closing system of the bag. A bracket in canvas with wooden locking system keeps the straps on the front, for better holding the bag in the middle of the back. There are several models and several fabric colors according to the manufacturing and use in the field. Indeed, the canvas tends to whiten with the sun. The half tent Plastch Palatka is here rolled in rod, to allow its transportation on the shoulder. You choose the side which you want to wear, but the practice is to wear it on the left shoulder, especially if you are right handed. It will require a second half tent to assembly for a complete tent. Think about getting a quick strap in canvas or leather to tie the two ends. Catch arms were common, more when dealing with explosive devices. The German handgrenade type 24 is shown here with a Soviet outfit, this being easier to use as pineapple grenade types. It was, however, less convenient to carry because of the bulky handle. But it’s easier to unpin a stick grenade with a simple string to pull than a pineapple grenade. The bag DP-28 was primarily intended for machine guns DP-28 providers, but could also be carried by the shooter himself if there were not enough men. It contains a steel transport box, with a capacity of 3 drums of 47 cartridges. Each magazine has its own place, preventing magazines to collide, so making noise, or even get scratched when it comes to travel. The body being round on the bottom, it is not made to be placed on the meaning we commonly call “bottom”. Be careful as you manipulate, you’ll have tilt the box for better stability. As the steel box has a locking system that is not compatible with the carriage in the transport bag, two flaps are placed on top with a lace to secure them. The DP-28 machine gun was a heavy weapon, widely used throughout the Second World War, because combining mobility and strength, despite some flaws we could find it. The principal could be the bipod, not very convenient to use (unlike MG42 for example), and not very strong; the second was the recoil spring was expanding when heated, causing shooting incidents. Despite the harsh Russian winter climate, the temperature of a weapon can rise very quickly after a magazine shot in full automatic mode. The magazine is unlocked by pulling the lever located behind the rear sight. On the model I have, this lever is welded, so I can’t lock magazine on the weapon. A small ring on top of the magazine is here to facilitate the reloading with ammunition of 7,62x54R, the same ammunition as the Mosin-Nagant. This weapon only fired in burst and weighed 9,12kg (empty) to 11,9kg with a filled magazine. So it was better to be a group to handle the weapon with additional magazines, to gain mobility. Here is what concludes this video, if you liked it, don’t hesitate to share it, to leave a blue thumb, comment and subscribe to my channel if you haven’t already done. And I’ll see you soon for a new video review of uniform or airsoft gun. Directed by Neo035 With the help of Mireille and Yves Thank you to Sergei (Schuster) for his help. Ah, big hug, with the canine companion.

58 Comments on "Tireur DP-28 soviet – Review d’uniforme"


  1. Je sais pas si tu trouvais que plus long pour les transitions ( Avec la photo où tu recharges le fusil mitrailleur ) c'était trop/pas assez, mais tu devrais faire attention au moment où tu coupes les musiques parce que ça donne une assez mauvaise impression ici, on dirait que tu coupes au milieu d'un "arc" de la musique ( De Gladiator si je ne m'abuse ).
    Enfin je dis ça je sais pas ce que tu aurais pu faire d'autre, mais sache juste que ça fait bizarre.

    Reply

  2. +Neo035
    Bonne vidéo même si effectivement les musiques des transitions se coupent un peu abruptement… Prévois-tu de faire une vidéo sur les grades de l'armée Rouge comme celle que tu as faite pour la Wehrmacht ?? Et prévois-tu de présenter des uniformes des Anglais (si tu en as…) ou des Français ???

    Reply

  3. Encore une fois, une bien belle tenue soviets (tu as du suée a gros goutte, même en Alsace en hiver je sue dans les couches hiver de cette tenue). Il faudrait que les fabricants se bouge pour sortir cette beauté en réplique.

    Reply

  4. Présenter un uniforme d'hivers (Soviet en plus) en été… Tu crevais pas un peu de chaud dedans par hasard ? :p

    Reply

  5. Ce DP-28 me rappelle physiquement pas mal notre bon vieux FM Chauchat…et celui ci aussi a souffert de défauts provoquant des incidents de tir…Coïncidence? JE NE PENSE PAS!
    Plus sérieusement, très bonne vidéo Néo '-'

    Reply

  6. J'ose meme pas imaginer ce qu'ils ont dû endurer les pauvres soviets avec une arme comme ça. Déjà que faire la guerre c'est pas facile, en plus dans des conditions climatiques très rudes, à ça on rajoute trouzmillions de kilos de chargeurs (qui ont meme pas une grosse capacité) et une arme designée par un bucheron aveugle, ca devait vraiment être un enfer.
    Chouette vidéo comme d'hab

    Reply

  7. slt super vidéo comme d'hab prévoit tu une vidéo sur les tenues camouflé allemande?

    Reply

  8. I want to see mg34 gunner video you lucky french, so lucky that you even won against germany in euro cup

    Reply

  9. bravo petit bonhomme en mousse , c'était extra , belle tenue même si jamais je me ferai une tenue Soviet . Putain plus jamais je commanderai au USA je fait du L , pris tenue L c'était mille fois trop grand , j'echange pour du M , un chouia grand donc faut du Small , incroyable  bon je vais mettre ma veste M a la machine et la faire retressir un peu lol. ! Ce n'est pas un cliché les Américains sont obèses

    Reply

  10. Salut ! Toujours aussi plaisant à regarder et on y apprend un peu l'Histoire avec un grand H 🙂

    Reply

  11. Salut Neo035 pourrais-tu faire des présentations d'uniformes et d'armes japonais et italiens ainsi que d'autres armée mois connues de la 2nde guerre mondiale?

    Reply

  12. j'adore tes vidéos de présentation d'uniformes c'est très intéressant.
    verra-t-on un jour une présentation de l'uniforme des fallschirmjäger ?

    Reply

  13. Merci neo, tes vidéos sont toujours très intéressantes mais aussitôt plaisantes à regarder ! Même pour des uniformes que je ne trouve pas très "beau"

    Reply

  14. Ah la Dp-28 aussi surnommé "tourne disque russe" par les allemands il me semble ^^ très belle repro continue comme ça !

    Reply

  15. Encore et toujours une vidéo très bien montée , très explicative et très esthétique !!! Un vrai plaisir de regarder tes vidéos

    Reply

  16. Salut, j'adore tes vidéos surtout sur le plan historique, continues comme ça ^^

    PS: C'est quoi la musique en 21:23 ? ^^'

    Reply

  17. 2:12 la Crimée est Russe maintenant 😤 l'est aussi ^^
    Mais excellente vidéo toujours soigné !

    Reply

  18. Désolé j'aime bien tes vidéos mais c'est un peu ennuyant de présenter des variante des mêmes uniforme soviétique alors qu'ont sais que tu as d'autres uniforme d'autres nations (France). Même si j'adore ce que tu fais.
    😉

    Reply

  19. slt super video pourrait tu faire un uniforme sur les tirailleur africain parce que il ne sont presque jamais representés dans le monde de l 'airsoft

    Reply

  20. Title is in English but video is in French. It's fucking stupid. It's like making the title in Russian but the video is spoken in English.

    Reply

  21. Why is there no link, when it says, that there is the link to all the items down below.

    Reply

  22. Пуговицы на погонах не могут быть желтыми. Они должны быть зелёного цвета.
    …from Russia with love

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *