Why Bolivia faces further turmoil as Evo Morales steps down | FT

Why Bolivia faces further turmoil as Evo Morales steps down | FT


Bolivia is in turmoil after its
president of the last 14 years, Evo Morales, fled the country. Mr Morales is seeking
asylum in Mexico following allegations of election fraud. One of Latin America’s
poorest countries, the landlocked Andean
nation of 11m people has seen weeks of
violent protests after elections on
October the 20th. In those elections
Mr Morales was attempting to win a fourth
consecutive term in power. He’s a hero for the country’s
marginalised groups. Mr Morales built a
reputation as a champion of the poor and the oppressed. He rewrote the
country’s constitution and nationalised
the gas industry, the mainstay of the economy. He took the proceeds from
that and spent them generously on social programmes. And those achievements won
him three successive election victories. But Mr Morales’s legitimacy
suffered a big blow in 2016. That was when he
ignored the results of a national referendum
in which Bolivians voted against allowing him
a fourth term in power. He stood anyway. And citizens who had supported
him started to feel he was maybe staying
in power too long. In last month’s
election, Mr Morales claimed victory on
the first round. But the Organization
of American States, which oversaw the poll,
and the European Union agreed that there’d been serious
irregularities in the voting. As opposition protests
mounted, Mr Morales agreed to a fresh election. But his critics said
he couldn’t be trusted to run a free or a fair vote. And the pressure
continued to mount. Over the last weekend, rank
and file police and military defected en masse to
join the protests, and the president’s
position became untenable. This led the country’s
military leader to request that Mr
Morales step down, which he did late on Sunday. Now the country faces a highly
uncertain future, divided between Mr Morales’s
supporters, who are denouncing what
they call a coup, and the opposition, which
is calling for law and order to be restored, and for fresh
elections as soon as possible. Violence is
continuing, and there is a dangerous vacuum of power. Bolivians are hoping,
meanwhile, that their country can heal its divisions and
move forward peacefully. But this is far from guaranteed.

23 Comments on "Why Bolivia faces further turmoil as Evo Morales steps down | FT"


  1. It's a complete mess of a situation, the only options were either horrendous or terrible. Morales lost a referendum in 2016 to be allowed to run in this election. He lost but still ran regardless of widespread accusations of voter fraud. at that point the options were either Bad, let Morales stay regardless, or Bad, the military coup. This whole mess is Morales's fault, but I don't envy the Bolivarian people with the new military government tearing up Indigenous flags.

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  2. Of course the Financial Times fails to mention: the Bolivian courts invalidated the referendum; the election had a higher turnout than the referendum; and that the OAS is mostly funded by the US – therefore not to be taken without a pinch of salt by any serious person.

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  3. Not a fan of Morales by any mean but…
    Oust a president, force him to resign and seek asylum, like it or not, it is a coup.

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  4. Morales should have not run for a fourth term. However, if I was a Bolivian I would have supported him. He fought for the people of Bolivia, and US corporations don’t like that.

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  5. Covert CIA operations to bring about coup to control mines for the benefits of transactional mining companies.

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  6. Go look up CEPR's paper. The election was fair, the association of American states is a US led body, we've been here like 100 times before, come on FT, Ur usually quite fair journalists, wtf was this?

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  7. Corporations want resources of all country's and make money off them ,shame. I think resoureces should be for the country and for the people. I hate that that poor people of any country looked down at just cause they ain't rich.

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  8. This is all about the Lithium reserves in Bolivia. Lithium is the new Oil. Lithium batteries will run the future economy (electric cars, smart phones, laptops, tablets, etc). USA is in Bolivia since it will need lithium like it currently needs oil.

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  9. The corrupt Evo Morales thought that he could stay in power indefinitely through rigged elections just like Fidel Castro and other leftist dictators like Daniel Ortega, Hugo Chavez, Nicolas Maduro, etc.

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  10. FT = FAKE NEWS OUTLET. ITS WAS CAPITALISTIC COUPS AND BOLIANS WILL BE FIGHT THAT AMERICAN COCAINE PUPPET . STOP LYING !

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  11. Im pretty sure Israel and its dog the US are behind this after evo morals declared Israel a terrorist country. This isn’t the first time “gods chosen people” tried to destroy a group of people and their homeland.

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  12. Clear on the ground reporting from La Paz
    <iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fthegrayzone%2Fvideos%2F553079875490826%2F&show_text=0&width=560" width="560" height="315" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true" allowFullScreen="true"></iframe>

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  13. He 'resigned' because he was threatened by Military generals and far right psychos who are backed by American corporations that want access to the resources in the region. This was yet another coup in Latin America to oust a democratically elected president who was genuinely for the people. SHAME! STOP SPREADING LIES!

    Reply

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