Why Do We Get F#*&% Up? – 8-Bit Philosophy

Why Do We Get F#*&% Up? – 8-Bit Philosophy


Society preaches that moderation is key and
that rabid indulgence is bad for you, yet we are also told that we have to
fight for our right… to party. This desire to live it up — to over eat, over drink, over spend, to over indulge — is never more prevalent than the holiday seasons. For some reason, getting eggnog wasted on a Thursday night in July is frowned upon, but during the holidays it’s expected.
It may even be necessary. Perhaps we afford ourselves the ability to be excessive during the holidays because it ensures us a good time. To relegate yourself to unhappiness during the holidays would be a waste of vacation days, right? But should we not maximize happiness
every day of our lives? “Thanks, I needed that.” Some might casually call this logic “hedonism.” The term “hedonism” is used in several contexts. In moral philosophy, it generally denotes the view that a good life should be a pleasurable life. In psychology, it stands for the theory that pleasure seeking is a main motivator of human behavior. Essentially — if it makes you happy, it
can’t be that bad, right? For someone like Epicurus, not so much. Because pleasure and pain aren’t
measured by simple bodily desires. Happiness is more of a state
of existence that is characterized by the freedom from mental distress and anxiety. Happiness is about maximizing well-being. It’s not simple physical pleasures,
or empty quests for fame, fortune, or power. Nietzsche is often read as a philosopher that
advocated hedonism. But against hedonism, Nietzsche
proposed a love of suffering and tragedy. Kind of like relegating yourself to watching Requiem for a Dream over and over. But for the most part, people seeking “the
good life” opt out of relentless pursuing tragedy or pleasure and favor living in moderation. In the 1920s, the temperance movement was a large part of the American political culture that served as a moral foundation
to buttress prohibition. Beyond the Judeo-Christian demand to have no idols like food and drink before god, temperance has its roots in pre-modern philosophy With Plato, earthly pleasures and bodily desires
ought to be put in check by rational forces. People that can’t put down that second pie are relegated to non-philosophical life — a lesser existence. Plato’s pupil, Aristotle, found a virtuous living
to be a condition for happiness, or eudemonia. This was a tempered life — where passions
were guided by the golden mean — a balance of drives held in check by enkratia,
or self control. In his “La Dolce Vita,” everything settles on
just right and balanced — sort of like goldilocks. But what do Plato, Epicurus, Nietzsche, and Aristotle know about living a good life in today’s world? Can you really trust the wisdom of anybody who’s never had a four loco or a fried Oreo before? From food to Netflix, our contemporary binge culture perhaps outmodes the Aristotelian and Nietzschean understandings of indulgence
and the shame that goes with it. “Ah fuck I’m getting a cinnabon.” For Contemporary American
philosopher Lauren Berlant, the reason that I am not happy after
eating an entire box of Krispy Kreme donuts has nothing to do with how much shame they kneed into the batter and sprinkle into the glaze. Rather it has to do with something she
calls cruel optimism. In her own words: “A relation of cruel optimism exists when something you desire is actually an obstacle to your flourishing…” It might involve food, drugs,
alcohol, fantasy, habits, or even love. These kinds of optimistic
relations are not inherently cruel. They become cruel only when the object that draws your attachment actively impedes the aim that brought you to it initially. We live in a time where the ability to live up to the Aristotelian good life is less and less possible According to Berlant, we are slowly working ourselves to death, living in a sort of haggard and demanding world where the contemporary worker is stuck perpetually experiencing the disappointment of unmet expectations. Working for a living means you probably
eat from the local food truck and visit the vending more than necessary, spend most of the day sitting behind a desk, all in the name of achieving the good life. Yet, the workplace becomes an obstacle to happiness. Then, when the worn out subject seeks relief in small pleasures—in the things that they find make them happy, they’re met with new expectations
and hurdles to happiness. It’s a constant cycle where the very object that makes them happy causes them the greatest amount of pain. Cruel optimism shows its cruelty here: in
developed nations, ‘comfort food’ and to be happy with. In other words, the emotional
‘solution’ contributes to the problem a per- verse mode of enjoyment in conditions
of plenty. The un-gendering of eating dis- connection between capitalism and this mode
of suffering suspended between gluttony and Like raging with friends to reduce the unhappiness?
Too bad they’re all shallow narcissists. Love scotch? “I love scotch.”
Oops- Your liver and your wife are missing. Find some joy in comfort food? Beware the inevitable guilt that comes after the food coma. It seems we are caught up in a vicious cycle. “I eat because I’m unhappy.
And I’m unhappy because I eat.” What do you think, dear viewer?
Is there true happiness? Or are we all stuck in a series of isolated nows? Are we just floating from beer to bong, from wake to bake, midday snack to midnight snack, slipping in and out of tryptophan induced naps, the transient feeling of microwave warm bliss, slowly leaving our bodies like so much baked potato heat, dissipating out into the ether? With that, Happy Holidays
from the Wisecrack crew!

100 Comments on "Why Do We Get F#*&% Up? – 8-Bit Philosophy"


  1. People who don't know how to limit their indulgence seem to struggle the most. Moderation is the only thing keeping me from being a more miserable fuck. It's always a balancing act like he says though.

    Reply

  2. why do i have the feeling that my entire life is based on something really ironic? i wonder how im gonna die? will i ever love myself? will i ever get a girl friend? what am i doing with my life? will i ever make an impact on the world? i am so lost! 🙁

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  3. Spends 6 minutes talking about how transient purchases and parties are ultimately meaningless and proceeds to tell you to buy a box of bullshit you'll play with once until next month's box of bullshit.

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  4. After binge watching the videos on this channel, now all I want is a fresh Krispy Kreme doughnut with chocolate and maybe wash it down with some egg nog…

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  5. I think our pleasure centers are fried like that Oreo. Look at any creatures reaction to our hyper enriched food. It's like an instant addiction. If we're ever bored we can whip out our phones and have the totality of human knowledge at our finger tips. One of these quoted a philosopher on how a man can not be alone in a room for long without going mad. Before contemporary tech people would be in that situation for at least short periods of time but now, never.
    The part about the culture that really fucks it up for us is a lack of contrast. Be positive, don't worry about it, be happy, take this pill it'll make you feel better. Too much light is just as blinding as the dark.

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  6. IMO, the feeling of happiness is not compromised by any factor. Whether or not we drink because we're under other life pressures, or fall in love when we least expect it; we could have a happy dream even while our bodies are ill, happy after a baby's born, or feel ecstacy after a grueling workout/fight or jamming to some music. I can be happy when I succeed, in my own self-awareness. Happiness just comes and goes by whatever situation we're in. How we got here and where we're going to end up should guide us.

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  7. I watched this as I eat a medium-size cup of chocolate ice cream at 4:42 in the morning… Ironic, isn't it? Regardless, this was a very interesting video… and good wake up call.

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  8. Kids, don't become drinkers.

    I downed a bottle of cheap rum at a party mixing it with Dr. Pepper. Have no memory past that. I woke up without clothes, having puked in my pocket where my wallet was, at a friends house, with no idea of how I got there until I was told we got a ride home… that I threw up in.

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  9. I hate when content creators say that they "love their audience" and then try to sell junk like Loot Crate to them. It's cognitive dissonance. Or a lie.

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  10. Watching this stuff after binging on YouTube makes me want to work again, does this guy also read audiobooks aswell 🤔

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  11. Oh. I can relate to that.

    I am not happy with my current state of life, so i watch wisecrack to relief my pain.

    But i does not solve my situation, my only situation is watching more wisecrack.

    😀

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  12. I think holidays are like a Purge philosophy for binging. If you get the desire to indulge out of your system one night, you are content with the rest of the year.

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  13. happiness is temporary, miserability is more constant.
    you have to find how to trigger the turn brain off button and do it as often as possible. An occupied mind is a happy mind

    no matter if it is because of drugs, exercise, dancing, kissing. Empty your mind and be happy or rather don't be unhappy

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  14. Some of the philosophers you mentioned had a sad life and a sad view of thing how can you learn happines from one who lived a sad life?I know that what we consider a happy life differs from person to person but still some people like nietzsche knew nothing about happines.

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  15. i personally think that binching destroys our pleasure because it is not the thing itself that brings us joy but the desire we have for it. In other words, we can only enjoy something when it has been lacking. when it is available in abundance it loses its satisfactory value. Self regulation is the key to actually enjoy things. If we only allow ourselves ocassionally we create desire and therefore satisfaction for ourselves. So kids, do drugs but do it ocassionally, only when you did your homework

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  16. I have come to the conclusion that the pursuit of truth and reason through mathematics, science and philosophy can grant me true happiness.

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  17. maybe, just maybe, true happiness is a lie, and others around you are suffering more than you do is the gate to pure joyful life. and the best way of keeping you happy is to enjoy everyone else's pain

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  18. this is so true, I feel quilty for doing stuff that doesnt really improve me in anyway. Seems like snacks and binge watching gives only brief. moment of happiness. I guess it is all about balance.

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  19. All I want for christmas~ is youuuuuuu "plays as the video criticizes binge watching and pursuit of only bliss

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  20. Often I think happiness is only about expectations. If we get a big promotion and make more money we usually raise our expectations. Vacation in Florida now needs to be vacation in the Bahamas. Having a reliable car to get to work becomes needing a new SUV every 2 years, and so on. If we keep doing that then our happiness never can change. No matter how much good fortune comes we will remain exactly as we were. Perhaps the key to happiness isn’t ever about raising the bar but instead being at peace with it. The happiest of all likely lowered it hence the quote and derivations of it “pay attention to the little things”

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  21. Occasional two-to-three day water fasts do wonders. They take you out of the cycle of caffeine highs and carb-induced lows and help clear your head.

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  22. So in short, this world can never satisfy us. Hmmm. It's almost as if were missing something. Like we were made or created for another world. A type of paradise or "heaven". wink**wink. nudge**nudge. I don't know. Something to think about.

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  23. You have to admit, this ideology is a bit depressing… (Well, at least I believe so…)

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  24. For me, happiness is a mix of having and being, to have and to not be leads to a shallow life, and to be and not to have, lead to pain and inequality. But, when one can establish a balance with what they want to be, and what they want to have, they are happy. Of course, happiness does not last forever, I'd say it's impossible to be forever happy without moments of pain and sadness. But I also feel like, the idea of being forever happy is overrated, pain and sadness is what makea us humans, a man who feels nothing but happiness can't help himself but become a sociopath, we need those feelings to know that we are, deep down, human.

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  25. The universe is meaningless and does not care about our good life well lived. I think in the face of that I will go to with hedonism every time.

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  26. I can get behind this, I do find now that the days I work the hardest I often feel the best all around when I get home. On my off days I just sit and make things and eat garbage. At work I'll clean things for the hell of it. It makes me feel good when something constructive has been done. Otherwise I'm just wasting my time with the tv and eating junk food all day. Still doesn't keep me from overindulging most of the time, but I'm starting to learn that I feel better not having all those fried oreos and wine till I'm sick.

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  27. I feel like something was missing from this discussion, at no point did he examine why we indulge to begin with. Maybe that's another subject all together. I just didn't see where there was any hint at an answer, only different ways of managing nihilism.

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  28. when beer does nothing for me and I'm bumping it up from 80 to 100+ proof, which I can't wake up or go to sleep without, should I seek help?

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  29. Thats really fucked up. You go on about true happness and then just wave toys in peoples faces. o.0

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  30. The very liberal ideals you cling to and espouse are the source of your unhappiness. You mention contradicting societal urges at the start of your video but fail to realize that the social pushes are not coming from the same sources. (The person who gets drunk on egg nog at Christmas frequently also gets drunk during the year. The person who frowns on getting drunk during the year usually does not have drunkenness as a part of their Christmas celebration.) Those of us who urge you to control your impulses do so because we (and you) have observed that getting drunk (and other similar frowned upon activities) has consequences, such as damage to your liver and your relationships. Toward the end of your video, you list various things you have tried to fill the void in your life with, but you note that they have all failed. That is because you are trying to fill a round hole with a square peg. Jesus loves you. He made you. He knows everything, including what will give you true fulfillment. Conservatives do enjoy and know how to have fun… We simply choose fun we can enjoy in the moment and not regret in the morning.

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  31. Of course I'm watching this on the one day where me and my pal decided to order some burgers instead of cooking proper food. lol

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  32. I'm so square my corners are sharp…..that is a quote I heard someone say about me. Why do people need to be F'ed up to have fun? I have a lot of fun and love life without drugs or lots of alcohol. I'm also a Christian and don't feel right doing those things either but still. Some say I had so much fun last night at the party….. I ask what did you all do…..they say I don't remember that is why it was fun. I don't understand that reasoning.

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  33. the more we have the less happy we are. IMO Look at some of the big wealthy people who own cars worth more then average people's houses. Not one car but 2 or 3 and multiple homes. Then you find out they committed suicide because they were depressed. They had more than most but yet were not happy. Look at kids with toys…..the more they have the less excited they are with them. You give a poor kid a match box car he is happy. Give that to a kid with electronics and lots of toys and he is sad because he wanted an electronic car he can drive.

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  34. The thumbnail on the pause screen titled "Why Do We Binge?" doesn't match the title of "Why Do We Get F#$$# Up?"

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  35. There is true happiness, and you nailed it when you said that the good life is more than just moments. It's an overall philosophy. We know we can never be happy all the time, so the best we can do is ride the train when we can

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  36. Interested in philosophy? Knowledge is power. Feed your Mind. Check out Hyperianism. https://www.iamhyperian.com/

    Reply

  37. Yeah, some asshole could feel golden and find pure elation from causing insurmountable pain and suffering to an individual for shits and giggles.

    Which is like, damn you need help.

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  38. 3:42 Explains a lot to me Given my situation in life. And a certain clarity the help me.

    Reply

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