Why Don’t You Use Soviet Terminology Like “Comrade?”

Why Don’t You Use Soviet Terminology Like “Comrade?”


Next question today. Hey David, I noticed that you don’t use some
of the Soviet terminology that is becoming in Vogue with part of the left, like calling
people comrades and talking about things being read in a positive way. Why don’t you use that terminology? Listen, I’ve sort of talked about this before. Um, I’m not a communist. I’m not a socialist. I don’t think that Leninism or Stalinist Marxism
are the directions that we should be going. Uh, as a society. My model is one of social democracy, taking
many of the elements that have worked well in Scandinavian Northern European countries,
uh, and tweaking them and doing things that account for the reality that the United States
is more diverse than a lot of those countries. And the United States has a lot of different
other cultural elements going on. So that, that’s basically my model. I don’t look back at the Soviet union, um,
with, uh, Rose colored glasses or in this nostalgic way, you know, in the same way that
the right talks about the golden age of the 1950s or whatever. And I just think that doesn’t make any sense. I also don’t look back at the Soviet era and
say that’s what we should be striving for. So I don’t know who you’re referring to. I, the only thing I can think of is I know
that a Hassan piker from the young Turks from TYT network has or had a show called Ajit
prop and okay. I mean, you know, call the show what you want. I don’t know that that’s necessarily what
I would call a show. I don’t need to make reference, um, to Soviet
terminology. I don’t know of anybody who calls others comrades,
but I believe you that it exists. It’s just not interesting to me. You know, I don’t there, I don’t think my
movement and the policy and ideas that I support of, uh, economic justice and, um, uh, welfare
programs that work and lifting people up and reducing inequality and fixing a lot of the
things that aren’t working, I don’t think I need Soviet terminology to make that a reality. I don’t think that it helps. And also the other thing is in general, I’m
not that big a fan aside from Soviet terminology. When I’m trying w I am a progressive, I want
to move forward. So in general, I don’t see the world as here’s
the phase we want to go back to. We to be moving forward. We might incorporate, incorporate economic
or cultural or societal elements from some time in the past, which might have overlap
with some other movement or country or era or phase. And that’s fine. But for me as a progressive, I’m seeing us
going to something new and unprecedented. So it’s against my nature to say let’s call
each other comrades or let’s do our Ajit prop or use Soviet terminology. Uh, because I’m not looking to go back to
something. I might incorporate things that worked from
the past, but I’m looking to go forward and do something new. So I’m not particularly interested in adopting
old terminology when what I want to do is actually see progress as the word progressive
contains within it a at M illogically if that is a, if that is a word. So that’s my view.

100 Comments on "Why Don’t You Use Soviet Terminology Like “Comrade?”"


  1. I would love to see all of us move forward. We can make this world better if we want to implement positive change. Start by voting. Back it up by expecting those we put in office do the right thing for people. Break up monopolies,respect checks and balances and demand regulations. Care for our fellow humans, and keep a close eye on corporations.

    Reply

  2. Because these "radical" positions are more in the tradition of FDR & Eisenhower, not Stalin & Marx.

    You can see how the false premise of the question is ment to be an attack in itself, but really just gives more insight into their poor grasp of the issues. Whoever posed this Q seems to only be prepared to dunk on imaginary strawmen, while really just preaching to the choir.

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  3. To me, all I can think of when I here the word "comrade" is the soviet union and I think it's creepy that people are using it again.

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  4. "I don't know anybody that call each other comrades." Heh, you let it slipped there. How is it that a career political commentator supposedly of "one of the most diverse country in the world" doesn't know anyone that use that terminology socially?

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  5. Comrade means friend or ally in the same cause. It's first use was during the french revolution but made popular in Russia revolution but socialists use it all the time. As a democratic socialist I use it all the time when speaking to fellow dem socialists or any ally on the left (social dems, progressives, etc). Also I enjoy using it around Trump supporters cause it triggers right wingers!

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  6. TL;DR – David is a Social Democrat/Left-leaning Liberal, not a Communist, and certainly not a Tankie.

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  7. Because most people have no idea what communism is, they have been brainwashed by the right.

    USSR "communism" is not real communism, but in some ways it is like modern Republicanism. Rich own and control everything, everyone else gets much less.

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  8. I've gone into a regular chat where we are watching Rachel Maddow & say, "Greetings, comrades." Apparently sarcasm gets totally lost on other people nowadays. Otherwise, I never use it!

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  9. WHY ARE OUR SOLDIERS BEING RENTED TO THE SAUDI'S AND WHY ISN'T THERE ANY REPORTING ABOUT IT😠😠😠😥😥😥😥

    Reply

  10. Yeah, that's a really random and dumb question.

    "Agitprop?" Dear God, has socialism really become this much of a hipster thing among the anti-establishment left?!?!

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  11. I'm pretty sure the vast majority of people using this terminology aren't looking to go back to days of Lenin, they're doing it partially in jest and partially as a sign of solidarity with one another.

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  12. That makes sense just take some of the things good ideas that worked from past ideologies. & Yeah we should be making something new.

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  13. Some people really can't tell the difference… Anyway, I'm not a communist or USSR-fanboy but I use every opportunity I get to sing:
    Союз нерушимый республик свободных

    Сплотила навеки Великая Русь…

    For the Cyrillically challenged:
    Soyuz nerushimy respublik svobodnykh

    Splotila naveki velikaya Rus'…

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  14. Honestly I think using the term comrade is kinda cringe. It’s been meme’d to hell so it’s not a very serious term to me. Also there seems to be a cultish aspect to calling everyone by one term. It’s like in frats or relegious groups when they call each other “brother” or “sister”. It’s like I ain’t your brother man. Just address people by their names, there is no need to refer to everyone you meet as a friend.

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  15. Ugh, I want to be a fan of David, but it's just so pathetic how he dances around topics such as this to not alienate far left fans.

    The Soviet is on par with the Nazi regime, and how David say "I don't if we should head in that direction…" instead of out right condemning everything about far left communism and the Soviet Union. It's so transparent and cowardly.

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  16. I love how Hassan was specifically name dropped in this. He immediately came to mind when I saw the title of this video. For real though, if you are in his discord you will see tons of hammer sickle profile pics, and regularly see people say things like "eat the rich". This is the biggest piece of evidence for horseshoe theory I have personally seen. I know for a fact these same people would go absolutely ape shit (and rightfully so) if they ever saw a right wing discord server with a bunch of people using nazi symbols and phrases. They would definitely not accept any excuse of justification they would say on why they use nazi symbols, yet the do exactly that with Soviet Union symbols and phrases. I really wish they would stop. It makes the left look bad.

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  17. Yeah the right and the far right romantize the 1950s alot. Gee I wonder why? Let's see racial segregation was still legal, women were stay at home moms, the men ran everything, white men that is. The country was majority white and less diverse like it is now. Hmmm gee I wonder.

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  18. I'm an actual socialist and have never met any non tankies who call people comrade or use Soviet terminology.

    Now I am seeing more tankies recently but I think a lot of this is misguided kids who think they are socialists and have to defend anyone who has ever declared themselves socialist. This seems to be a side effect of socialism becoming something of a fad with certain younger people. They have no idea of the history or the philosophies involved and are just posing. This seems to be the case in the various chapters of DSA that have sprung up in the last 4 years. Even in the SP USA we've been having some of these sorts show up.

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  19. I don't use it. I have no qualms with people using it. It has a useful definition. I don't even think only socialists or communist sympathizes use it. Though it does trigger the right a lot, so maybe I might adopt it into my vocabulary.

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  20. Exponentials
    https://youtu.be/dxqc-QDVPws
    Obsolete species
    Because every one is a cultural lag

    A snail cant keep up with quantum leap
    Can any of you compete with a million IQ +
    The irony

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  21. There has been a call to start decrying communist since millennials do not recognize the “socialist boogeyman”

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  22. I use 'comrade' with a good bit of irony, and the friends I use it with mean it as a joke, as well. People on the right call us Soviets anyway, so we roll with it and wink.
    But your point on how this is about moving forward, progressing, we shouldn't be using terms of the past, makes me think the left should take up a different word for friend.
    'Ally' gets used a lot already, maybe that should be it?

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  23. I know it's a little old school but I love when Cornel West addresses friends and strangers alike as brothers and sisters.

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  24. "Comrade" isn't Soviet terminology. It's military terminology.

    It got populist connotations after the French and then Russian revolutions, but I'm not sure most people think of it as "Soviet terminology".

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  25. David, why are you taking trolls so seriously? Nobody calls anyone comrade except in the imaginations of mentally deficient wannabe activists who still lives in their mom's basement.

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  26. Well, comrade is a leftist term not specific to communists, anarchists for example commonly used the term. Furthermore, David is clearly not a comrade, he's not a leftist at all he's a bourgeois pig.

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  27. I don't think of the term Comrade in the way Hassan or David think about it. I'm completely neutral to the term. But I do think David is thinking way to much about the term. David seems to be way to busy shoving negative connotations and making a mountain out of a mole hill about it. Just like Cenk does. Meh….

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  28. Mid 16th century French = camerade. From the Spanish camarada, meaning roommate. Origin, Latin. Camera, meaning chamber.

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  29. I am unapologetic for being a liberal , it’s Trumpers that have to apologize for destroying America with their ignorance

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  30. The last time I looked "comrade" was an English word. We're getting into silly territory. "Progessive" is a fancy word for liberal. After all who isn't for progress. "Gay", "Lesbian" are politically correct but what's wrong with word: homosexual? The party was a gay affair. "Gay

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  31. In Norway, comerade – "kamerat" in Norwegian – is a commonly used word to describe a friend, usually male. It is so ingrained in the culture that most people see it as a completely non-political word. It is used by all people, not just socialists.

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  32. Seems like Che Guevara was a genius after all for wanting to change Democracy economic enslavement in Latin America.

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  33. Comrade isn't soviet exclusive lmao. It is part of the Russian language and is used commonly not associated with communism but with someone being my friend.

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  34. Well, as someone from a former socialist country, I can say the term "comrade" itself was weird even back then and only used by members of the party or government officials for the most part. It was intended to replace words like "mister", but didn't really catch on with the general public. Other terms were what people called "the wooden language", this formal, unintelligible language, which was repeated all the time by leaders and in the media, like "multilaterally developed socialist society". Today, we only use the word "comrade" for male friends, like "I went out for some beers with a few comrades" Using it with other meanings, would sound… archaic, it would be really weird.

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  35. Since conservatives sold out our country to the Commie-Pinkos
    it seems to me like they are the ones who should be running around
    calling each other "comrade."

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  36. Because David pakman is a fucking social democrat who doesn’t understand socialism or is deliberately dishonest about it. He’s so ignorsnt he can’t even just say “socialist left” he has to call it the “Leninist” or “revolutionary left” and he constantly lies about Venezuela and Bolivia too — imperialism in Latin America? That’s ok to David Pakman who had a Marxist economist professor but pretends not to understand what socialism is or that you can only achieve, as Richard wolff his own professor explains, social democracy BECAUSE of socialism. Norway has social democracy because socialists fought captialists and social democracy was the compromise.

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  37. As a socialist, leninism and stalinism are really not even socialism. They are authoritarian dictatorships, or right wing, fascist derivatives of marxism. Mainstream libertarian socialism in Russia was defeated after the bolshevik revolution in 1917. To praise the horrendous tyrannies of Lenin and Stalin is shameful, really. There was no democracy associated with Leninism and Stalinism. Workers did not own the means of production. Employees worked for wages, going completely against Marxist philosophy. David is correct when he says we shouldnt look back to the Soviet era with nostalgia. Lenimism and Stalinism are not what the Left seeks to achieve

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  38. Lol, someone actually think that David is a leftist. And no, you don't simply use those words to call your friends…even in USSR.

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  39. So.. David is a progressive none socialist pro capitalist but using Scandinavians socialist leaning policies to progress toooooo… what exactly? I’m unclear

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  40. If you like being addressed as "comrade" go along to a Labour Party conference now Corbyn is leader, the majority of the delegates are more than happy to address each other as comrade. Whilst this may appeal to those on the far-left in UK politics it certainly doesn't endear centre-left and moderate voters to the party, when a mainstream party goes to the extremes it just makes them unelectable, as the party was for eighteen years…beware what you wish for, in the UK its odds on we'll get a conservative government which will mean we've had tory rule for fifteen years, go too far and you get exactly what you don't want. Avoid the center at your peril.

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  41. In the same vein I would call myself a 'physicalist' rather than a 'materialist' or 'idealist'.

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  42. David has more confidence in markets than I do. In my view progress will move away from private authority. I encourage people to read more in depth about Distributive Justice philosophy. A good place to start is Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Look at differences and tensions between Desert Theory and Entitlement Theory, then read John Rawls and contrast with Robert Nozick, Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, and Karl Polanyi's The Great Transformation. These are all good starting points for critiquing markets (without necessarily depending on Marx) and why they're inadequate sources of justice. Build your ability to unpack right-wing market authoritarianism without resorting to cliches.

    David, it would be interesting if you made a video wherein you list your favourite authors, books, or papers on Distributive Justice. Your own critique of Marx may even help me decide whether I consider you 'progressive enough'. Perhaps you could arrange for an interview with David Harvey where you critique Marx on specific disagreements. That would get views.

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  43. I am pretty leftist but taking Soviet language is a bad idea. It must be acknowledged that stalinism prevailed and they did not do socialism well at all. We need to look forward and create a positive political revolution and our own language.

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  44. It makes me feel sick when I hear people using such terminology. It's disrespectful for the people that had to live under the socialist dictatorship. If you don't believe me, go to any former bloc country in Eastern Europe and see how people there react.

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