Why You Believe in God and Capitalism

Why You Believe in God and Capitalism


Hello everybody! A lot of capitalists
seem to assume people who don’t work, yet still get a share of resources, are
socialists gaming the system, when one could easily say they’re actually
capitalists profiting off the work of others. Identical behavior viewed from
different perspectives. I guess it depends on how we define work.
I define work by physical action. If I’m physically moving heavy things around,
I’m working. If I’m a sitting at a desk, thinking, I’m not working. I’ve actually
had people try to convince me that mental work is actually more tiring than
physical work. All of them were office workers. I’ve done
office work. I’m doing it now, writing books and talking to you. They’re full of
shit Capitalism and socialism can actually
complement each other. I know this makes about as much sense as Boris Johnson’s
barber, but look at the most successful countries today, and by successful I mean
with the highest quality of life and the happiest populations. Social
democracies like Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark, Iceland, and to a certain extent New
Zealand, Australia, Holland, Switzerland, and Canada.
They all thrive by combining both doctrines. Now every country does this,
whether you want to admit it or not, but the ones I’ve mentioned seem to get the
balance just right, as evidenced by their topping just about every empirical
happiness and freedom metric there is. Now I have noticed, especially among patriotic
British and American right-wingers, a tendency to either
strawman the concept or accuse these more successful countries of being
boring. One could dismiss this attitude as ego damage control, but there’s an
unwitting point to their snowflakery. Life is not enlivened by the tedium of
administration. Bean-counting isn’t sexy. Life is made more lively by idiots who
do stupid shit, like elect a childish moron as their leader, or vote to
leave the most successful trading organization in the world. Rash,
counterintuitive, and potentially harmful decisions, perhaps even disastrous in a
world war 3 kind of way. But they’re also very interesting. It gives us tons to
talk about down the pub, and that’s what life is really all about for an individual
human; the acquisition of anecdotes. Our stories increase the value of our
interactions because we’re social creatures.
That’s what we do. Ever since humans developed language, narrative has been
the mainstay of our cultures. The majority of people on the planet are
religious, for example. Being religious means believing a local mythology, or a
local story, to be true. And the most agreeable mythologies–the most agreeable
stories–are the ones that caught on. But where do these stories come from? When
you put a pigeon in a Skinner box and feed it through the hopper completely
randomly, the pigeon associates whatever its last behavior was with the sudden
acquisition of a food pellet. So it repeats the behavior.
But the hopper delivery is random, so it tries some other behaviors, and gets
another pellet. Now he has two reinforced behaviors to cycle through. Over a
surprisingly short amount of time you have a cavorting pigeon with more
physical tics than a meth addict in a clock shop, and every pigeon develops a
completely unique pattern. That’s us. That’s the operant conditioning
mechanism that forms different cultures, and it’s why some people still believe
in magic gods. The Abrahamic religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, are
particularly to blame for introducing this idea that humanity is semi-divine.
Above nature rather than part of it, and thereby entitled to consume our natural
habitat. God gave it to us for this purpose, right? So they believe it’s an
endless resource. That’s a huge problem now, manifesting in right wing
exploitation and left wing mismanagement. Now here’s a potential solution; admitting
we all contains something of both ideologies. Stop demonizing the one
you’ve been conditioned to disagree with. A polarized ideology and reality hardly
ever jive. We need to embrace the one reality of human society that actually
means something to everyone, and that’s community. It’s the way we’ve always been,
so in our natural state, if you consume other people’s limited time on earth
for your personal profit rather than a communal benefit, you get cast out.
Banished. The worst punishment for a communal animal is being stripped of its
community. Or you may prefer a stone axe to the back of the skull. We do that, too. Yes, I’m talking about the Paleolithic in
the present tense on purpose. We’re domesticated to the point now that
if we don’t have money, we literally starve. We’re so reliant on our
compartmentalized community to provide for us, whatever our political
affiliation or income bracket, we’re no longer actual humans, if we define
humanity by what it is we actually evolved to do. The division of labour has
resulted in us being easily replaceable cogs in a corporate machine. I’ve
actually had people tell me that water isn’t free, for example, when it falls
out of the &*$%ing sky. So it’s a demonizing of the other side that prevents progress, in my opinion. We’re wasting a lot of time and resources arguing about stupid shit,
whipped along by the propaganda of our corporate taskmasters. Capitalists claim
socialists are soft and misguided. Socialists claim capitalists are selfish
and stupid. There may be a little truth in both–what would help immensely would
be to turn that glaring lens towards yourself, and use what you find as a
lesson.

5 Comments on "Why You Believe in God and Capitalism"


  1. I think I might have to shoot some more early morning videos at Scarborough harbour! I really enjoyed the scenery.

    Reply

  2. Totally excellent (seriously not blowing smoke up your …)
    Informative, entertaining, funny and real 👍
    With faultless delivery 👍👍👍 when are you standing for election?
    We need a new looking alternative approach to running this country.
    By the way I’ve finished your book when’s the next one coming out?
    Best Regards Dave 👍😀🐾🍺

    Reply

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